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Performance management
 

Performance management

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some key steps in installing a performance management system in your organisation

some key steps in installing a performance management system in your organisation

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  • Our agenda: Objectives and Introductions Why Performance Management is important The Performance Management Framework for the BC public service What the EPDP Process looks like The Tools and Resources available to assist us all Getting Started, and Next Steps Going through this will take about 2 hours. This will be a participatory session. I’ll be presenting information to you and asking questions. Please feel free to ask questions or make comments as we’re working through this material.
  • There are two objectives for this session: To introduce the Employee Performance and Development Plan process to you, and To help you get started on using it. After this session, you will be asked to work on your own EPDP. So, please make sure you ask about anything that is unclear, as we go along.
  • Before we talk about ‘how’ to do performance management, let’s just spend a couple of minutes on why this is important and why a government-wide performance management system is being put in place.
  • There were several factors that led to the development of this Performance Management process for government. These included: The creation of a Government Strategic Plan Public Service Renewal Research Results both within and outside Government, and Trends I’m going to review each of these briefly …
  • These six goals formed the basis of Public Service Renewal and are now in Government’s Corporate Human Resource Plan They were developed based on an extensive consultation process with employees. These goals are designed to contribute to the vision of ‘achieving excellence in public service’. What we’re discussing today supports the ‘Performance Focused Workplace’ goal.
  • And, here’s what research generally is telling us: Nine out of ten employees, from all generations, say they want: Work that gives them personal satisfaction Work that is valued by their employer and their customer Work with an employer who understands that personal lives are important too My guess is that this is pretty consistent with what all of us would like, too.
  • And other research has confirmed that: Employees want their organization to involve them more in the organization’s direction. They want to know how they can make a contribution to the organization’s mission, goals and strategy. Employees want to know how their position fits into the big picture, and the part that will play on the team. Knowing how your position fits into the big picture is what performance management is about. It helps to align personal and corporate goals.
  • Looking at the trends, performance management today may be different from what you have experienced in the past. As there have been Strategic Shifts in the ministries, there has also been a strategic shift in Employee Performance Management. In the past, we did appraisals, and now we look at on ongoing cycle of Plan Focus Review The key differences are.. (outline bullets on right hand side)
  • And, if you’re still wondering if this is a good thing to do and whether it really does make a difference, here’s some further research to support performance management and establishing goals and measures. A recent Harvard study shows that we are 7x more likely to achieve goals if they are set and written down A Boston Consulting Group called Hewitt Associates did research that showed that "companies with year-round performance systems significantly outperformed competitors lacking such systems in financial measures such as return on equity, stockholder return, sales growth and cash flow." And, a US human resource scorecard survey of the top 10% and bottom 10% performing firms showed that there is a direct correlation between a strong human relations strategy and positive business results.
  • Let’s focus specifically now on the Employee Performance and Development Plan or EPDP performance management process. It was developed by a cross ministry team specifically for the BC public service. The EPDP process has been designed to be flexible to meet our individual Ministry needs. At the same time, it has consistent foundations or principles for all of Government.
  • These are the principles the process is based on: No one understands your job better than you. That’s why having an employee-initiated performance management process is successful and practical. As your manager/supervisor, my job moves from putting together a summary of what you accomplished last year to coaching for the upcoming year and providing input and feedback on your individual plans and results. The emphasis has shifted to being on the dialogue that takes place between employees and supervisors. The process is forward looking to focus on getting the results we want to achieve. The process includes developing a plan, focusing or revisiting that plan and then reviewing it. Individual plans are to be results-oriented and linked to our Ministry Service Plan and our goals as a team. The process is also about determining our individual development needs and the competencies we need to be building And, as I said earlier, the key to the whole process is the dialogue that occurs between us.
  • Just based on those principles, what do you see as the benefits for the Ministry and Government as a whole, and for each of us individually? (You can note their responses on a flipchart, if available, for further/later reference.)
  • Here’s some benefits that have been defined for the organization as a whole. (Note, where any have already been identified in the earlier discussion.) We will have a common approach to setting goals and reviewing employee performance & development We will be aligning our individual plans and goals with ministry goals There will be ongoing dialogue between employees and supervisors on their performance & development plans This process links to corporate learning & development, career & succession planning,and rewards & recognition.
  • And, here’s some that were identified for us as individuals. (Again, acknowledging where some have already been been described.) Specifically, you will have the opportunity to understand: How your work contributes to and fits with the ministry’s goals What key competencies are needed to be successful in your job What you need to develop to build your career How your work performance will be measured and recognized
  • Individual performance planning is the foundation to achieving our overall goal for government. Ideally, all of these plans are developed and timed to cascade down to help us in doing our individual planning. Ministries are working hard to make this happen. However, with all of the changes Government is going through, rarely does everything synchronize perfectly here, or in other organizations. Even if we don’t have all of these plans in place to support developing our own EPDPs, we should still have a personal plan to highlight the work that we will achieve. Even with no other plans, individual plans still form the foundation for getting things done. (Be prepared at this point to share and discuss what plans exist within your Ministry.)
  • Consistent with the benefits that have been identified, the objectives of EPDP are to ….. Develop shared expectations between employees and supervisors on key performance and development goals Establish specific and measurable individual goals that contribute to ministry goals Facilitate ongoing personal development and career planning, and to Provide regular opportunities for feedback and coaching on performance
  • The EPDP process consists of 3 key phases: Planning - is about setting goals for our work (what we’ll accomplish), competencies (how we will go about accomplishing our work goals) and development (what skills we’ll work on developing). Ideally, this phase is done at the start of the fiscal year to coincide with our ministry’s planning cycle. However, we have the flexibility to decide what starting point works best for our work unit. Focusing - is about revisiting our plan with our supervisor and realigning our goals as needed on an ongoing basis throughout the year. We should aim to do this at least at the mid-year point. Reviewing - where together with our supervisor, we review performance.
  • The Employee Performance and Development Plan has three main sections: - Work goals, key competencies and a personal learning plan Work goals are about ‘what we do’. Typically you will have 3-8 of your top goals with objectives, strategies and measures for each. Setting work goals is about determining the priority areas you will focus on in your work. Try to group them according to key areas of our work such as strategy/planning, operational, project and people. Key Competencies are about ‘how we do it’. While there are many competencies we need for our job, the EPDP has us focus on 2-3 that are critical to our success, that we will pay particular attention to. Note: at a minimum refer staff to the Core public service competencies on the Public Service Agency website at gww.bcpublicservice.gov.bc.ca/competencies/ A Personal Learning Plan is about ‘what we will learn’. This is not about training courses, but what information and skills will be key to your job and your career. For example, it may include items such as interviewing 3 senior leaders to understand more about 3P’s - public private partnerships. Or making a presentation to a senior team.
  • Let’s take a look at Phase I – writing your Performance Plan. This is what you are working on right now. The objective is to establish your priorities and plan for the upcoming year. More details on this phase can be found in your guidebook on page 4. The essential steps you will take are: Review Ministry, Division and Work Unit plans (talk about where these are available to employees) Identify key work goals. We’re going to talk a little more about what these and the next one… Identify key competencies - …look like: Develop a personal learning plan that identifies what action you will take to further develop your skills Meet with your supervisor, review, finalize and agree on the plan, and lastly (talk about the need to ensure there is mutual agreement on the priorities outlined in the plan. It is the supervisor's responsibility to ensure all staff are focused on the priority areas for the organization) Sign off on the plan Employees are expected to take the initiative to book the performance meetings with their supervisor. As your supervisor/manager, it is my responsibility to ensure that I make the time for this.
  • Let’s look more closely at two areas of the plan – goals and behavioural competencies. Goals Identify three to eight key work goals that will have the greatest impact on achieving our work unit and organization goals. These goals should be SMART meaning - specific, measurable, achievable, realistic and timely. (Ask for examples of SMART work goals specific to your group and note them on a flipchart for all to see) Behavioural Competencies There are three core competencies for all public service positions - teamwork & cooperation, service orientation and results orientation - and five leadership competencies for managers and supervisors. In this section of the plan, identify the key competencies that you think you will need to focus on to achieve your work goals and how you will demonstrate these competencies during the year. Remember, behavioural competencies describe how we go about doing our job, not what we do in our job. If the core competencies do not fit with work goals for this year, look through the Competency Dictionary on the website to see if others fit more with your work goals. The website address is gww.bcpublicservice.gov.bc.ca/competencies/ Let’s look at a few examples. (Ask people to identify some ways they could demonstrate the public service competencies.)
  • Ultimately, phase 1 of the EPDP process should ensure we are heading in the right direction for the upcoming year. (read caption)
  • In Phase II - Performance Focus, the objective is to assess if your plan is on track and realign as appropriate. More details on this phase can be found in your guidebook on page 5. The steps you will take are: …. Review your EPDP. Take the time to think about whether there are any supports you need to achieve your work goals from others or your supervisor Meet with your supervisor to discuss progress and the need for any changes, and Update your plan as required Again, individual employees should take the initiative to book time with their supervisor, but as a supervisor, I have to ensure I have met with all of you. In this phase, you may need to redraft parts of your plan. If, for example, there have been fundamental changes in the team’s or ministry’s goals and direction, or if the requirements of your job have changed.
  • Phase II - Performance Focusing helps to ensure you are on track with your plan, and gives you an opportunity to receive any coaching or support that may be required. (read caption)
  • In Phase III - Performance Review, the objective is to discuss and share feedback on the successes and challenges in achieving the goals over the past year. More details on this phase can be found in your guidebook on page 6. The steps you will take are: Summarize your results Meet with your supervisor to discuss those results, and Sign off on the review You will want to summarize both your accomplishments and shortfalls here. The manager/supervisor adds their own review of your performance. You may also want to use this meeting to get input for your plan for the next year. While it is you and your supervisor’s choice whether or not to do a review and plan for the next year together, more commonly the, review is done first, and then a second meeting for the next year’s EPDP is held.
  • Phase III - Performance Reviewing is about summarizing your accomplishments, assessing how you have done, and getting feedback from your supervisor on your overall results. (read caption)
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  • In addition to the core elements of the EPDP, there are several other sections we can choose to add. For example, if you have had no previous reviews and would like to establish a starting point for reference, you may wish to complete Phase III to recognize past performance. It may also be critical to specifically reference elements of your ministry service plan or team plan. Including a career plan is also recommended, although you may want to include this in your next year’s plan once you have had a chance to work with the core elements of the EPDP. If you need specific support from your supervisor or other teams, you may want to reference it. And we would always include additional accomplishments, whether or not they were part of your original plan.
  • So how does the overall cycle work? This is the typical cycle -- develop your plan in March/April, Focus in November/December, and review and plan again in March/April. In order to support linkages in plans throughout the organization and to provide solid performance measures and results in your plan, it helps to tie it to the fiscal year cycle. Performance management research shows that best results are achieved this way. 360 degree feedback surveys can also be part of the cycle. This survey is currently available for senior managers across the public service. If executive teams do the survey, it’s recommended they are conducted mid-year. This allows participants to focus on ‘how’ they are doing things versus ‘what’. It also allows participants to build in action items into their next year’s plan.
  • To this point, we have focused on the individual Performance Management process. But it is important to know that this is just part of a larger integrated performance management framework. Our individual plans should link to the government strategic plan, ministry plan and branch plan. Competencies should provide a foundation for ‘how’ we accomplish our goals. The development part of our plan should provide information to support government wide training, succession planning, etc. And the reviewing phase should support informal and formal recognition processes.
  • There are a number of tools and resources to assist you. In addition to the guide book you have and the sample forms, there are a number of resources on the Public Service Agency website for your reference. www.bcpublicservice.ca/performance_management.htm
  • (Use this slide if iPlan is available in your ministry) iPlan is a web-based tool that’s available for us to use for managing the EPDP process. In addition to taking you through the process, its website includes tools and information on competency development, building self-awareness, team building and career planning. To use iPlan. . . (insert how to access info for your ministry)
  • Having gone through the process, let’s focus specifically on getting started by discussing first of all what the challenges are. (Ask people what they see as the challenges to getting started.)
  • Performance management is not easy. Here are some areas that are common challenges, some of which you’ve already identified. Anyone can and should complete a plan regardless whether or not they have a divisional/team plan, or if their job description is current or even exists. In many cases, the performance plan becomes a much more reliable description of your priority work. If competencies do not exist for your role, identify the ones you feel are key to your position (see the competency dictionary) It is important to group your activities into 3-8 key work goals. It is confusing to laundry list the many activities you have. Identifying clear and practical measures can be a real challenge, especially for advice and support roles. Consider what success would look like (i.e. all customers are satisfied with service received) and identify ways to validate it. For example, we can randomly check with a few customers regarding service. Creating tight linkages to broader plans can be time consuming and restrictive. Do what feels right. Time is the biggest challenge people face. Remember, it is also the most important part of your job. It gets easier to do every time you do it.
  • To help get started, let’s actually do some of the pieces of the EPDP. Hand out examples from Employee Performance Management website at www.bcpublicservice.ca/performance_management.htm Give people 20 minutes to work through each section. Ask for people’s examples Review and discuss as a group
  • So, it is now up to use to get started. Here’s some recommended next steps.
  • Remember, performance planning leads to high performance results. We have a lot of strength, experience and skill on our team and know that this process will help us highlight how we contribute to a strong and progressive organization. Does anyone have any questions that they would like to bring up? Thank you everyone for your thoughtful participation and look forward to meeting with each of you about your work and personal development goals!

Performance management Performance management Presentation Transcript

  • PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT Arriffin Mansor 1
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  • Agenda Objectives and Introductions Why Performance Management Performance Management Framework Performance Management Process Tools and Resources Getting Started Next Steps 4
  • Objectives of the session Introduce staff Performance planning and appraisal systems Set clear objectives and goals Identify key result areas Agree on the key performance indicators with your superior Set performance targets for the next period 5
  • Why do Performance Management? 6
  • Why….. Effectiveness – objective and goal achieving and target settings Efficiency driven Strategy formulations Benchmarkings Compensation plans Continuous improvement Trends 7
  • #5 PERFORMANCE IS A CONTINUOUS PROCESS STRATEGY 60% of organizations 85% of management don’t link strategy & update the test the teams spend less than budgets strategy Strategic Learning Loop hypotheses one hour per month on strategy issues BALANCED SCORECARD BUDGET78% of organizations lockbudgets to an annual cycle reporting 92% of organizations funding Management Control Loop20% of organizations take do not report on lead more than 16 weeks to indicators prepare a budget PERFORMANCE Input Initiatives & Programs Output (Resources) (Results)
  • #4 CASCADING METRICS AT ALL LEVELS CORP SBUTop-Down “Bridging • EDUCATION Bottom-Up Process toProcess” To Share the Internalize & ExecuteStrategy & Align the the Strategy Workforce • PERSONAL GOAL ALIGNMENT • BALANCED PAYCHECKS The Strategy Focused Workforce
  • Principles of the Strategy Focused Organization:#3 LINK AND ALIGN THE ORGANIZATION AROUND ITS STRATEGY #3. #1. Each Support Unit develops a A Corporate Scorecard defines plan and BSC for “best practice” overall strategic priorities on a sharing to create synergies across Balanced Scorecard (BSC). Subordinate Commands. CORPORATE AMEDD CORPORATE SCORECARD Major Subordinate Commands SUPPORT UNITS EXTERNAL PARTNERS (Shared Strategic Agenda) SBU SBU SBU SBU Themes Measures A B C D 1. Financial Growth xxx • Finance 2. Delight the Consumer xxx • Marketing • Customer Scorecards 3. Win-Win Relationships xxx • Distribution • Distributor Scorecard 4. Safe & Reliable xxx • Procurement • Joint Venture Scorecard 5. Competitive Supplier xxx • Purchasing • Vendor Scorecard 6. Good Neighbor xxx • Safety • New Venture Scorecard 7. Motivated & Prepared xxx xx xx xx xx 8. Quality xxx • Human Resources • Outsourcer Scorecard • Information Technology #2. Each Division develops a BSC consistent with corporate strategic BSC.Strategies Are Executed Through Business Units. The Strategies of the Business Units Must Be Integrated If Organization Purpose and Synergies Are to Be Achieved.
  • Public Service Goals and Renewal To develop a performance Effective Proactive and management Visionary People Strategy Leadership system that:Progressive Employee- To achieve Performance • supports employees excellence in Focused Employer Relations public service Workplace in achieving their performance & Learning and Flexible and Motivating development goals Innovative Work Organization Environment • aligns their goals with those of the organization. 11
  • Performance management supports work satisfaction“Nine out of ten employees, from all generations, say they want: Work that gives them personal satisfaction Work that is valued by their employer and their customer Work with an employer who understands that personal lives are important too” Ranstad: 2001 Employee Review: Insights into Workforce 12
  • Performance management aligns personal & corporate goals“Employees want their organization to involve them more in the organization’s direction. They want to know how they can make a contribution to the organization’s mission, goals and strategy.Employees want to know how their position fits into the big picture, and the part that will play on the team” Aon Consulting Canada@Work: Workforce commitment Report 2000 13
  • Shifts in Performance Management PAST NOW Appraisal  Plan, Focus and Review Manager driven  Employee initiated and managed Backward looking  Forward looking Once per year  1-2 times, ongoing process Tasks (job description)  Results/Outcomes linked to Service Plan, team goals Minimal personal  Development & development competencies integral 14
  • Do goals and measures improve performance? Harvard study – 7x more likely to achieve goals if they are set and written down Boston Consulting Group/Hewitt Associates: "companies with year-round performance systems significantly outperformed competitors lacking such systems in financial measures such as return on equity, stockholder return, sales growth and cash flow." US HR Scorecard survey of the top 10% and bottom 10% performing firms - “survey results clearly show that there is a direct correlation between a strong human relations strategy and positive business results.” 15
  • Employee Performance andDevelopment Planning Process 16
  • Principles in performance management Employee initiated and managed Forward looking Incorporates a plan, focus and review cycle Results-oriented and linked to Service Plan and team goals Personal development & competencies key components Employee-supervisor dialogue is key to success 17
  • Benefits -Individual & Organizational What are they? 18
  • Organizational benefits of performance management Common approach to setting goals and reviewing performance & development Aligning individual plans with corp goals Ongoing dialogue between employees and supervisors on performance & development Links to corporate learning & development, career & succession planning, rewards & recognition 19
  • Your roles in performance managementUnderstand: How your work contributes to set goals Key competencies required to be successful in your job What you need to develop in order to be successful How your work/performance will be measured and recognized 20
  • performance planning is the foundation Strategic Planning Service Planning Service Planning Individual Performance 21 Planning
  • Objectives of EPDP Develop shared expectations between employees and supervisors on key performance and development goals Establish specific and measurable individual goals that contribute to the set goals Facilitate ongoing personal development and career planning Provide regular feedback and coaching on performance 22
  • Performance Mgt– Three Phases Plan •Goal setting •Competencies •development Review Focus •Employee and •Dialogue and Supervisor review realigning goals as needed 23
  • Employee Performance and Development PlanEmployee Performance and Development Plan What you do • Top 3 to 8 goalsKey Work Goals • List key goals and objectives/ strategies/ measures for each How you do it • Top 2 to 3 goals • List key competencies most critical to your success and howKey Competencies you will focus on them What you will learnPersonal Learning Plan • Areas of personal development • How you will improve your24 skills
  • Phase I – Performance PlanObjective: Establish your goals and plan for the upcoming year with your superior Review Ministry, Division and Work Unit plans Identify key work goals Identify key competencies Develop personal learning plan Meet with your supervisor Sign off plan 25
  • Developing goals & Selecting competenciesGoals Competencies Specific  Public Service – Teamwork & Measurable cooperation Achievable – Service Orientation – Results orientation Reasonable  Leadership Timely 26
  • Performance Planning brings clarity to ensure we are heading in the right direction Say…What’s a mountain goat doing way up here in a cloud bank?” 27
  • Phase II - FocusObjective: Assess if your plan is on track and realign work goals as appropriate. Review your EPDP Meet with your supervisor Update your plan as required 28
  • Performance focusing helps ensure we are on track with your plan “Well, this is just going from bad to worse.” 29
  • Phase III – performance appraisalObjective: Discuss and share feedback on the successes and challenges in achieving the goals over the past year Compare results against target Meet with your supervisor to discuss results Sign off review 30
  • Performance reviewing is summarizing our results and getting feedback 31
  • A Complete Metrics is a Program for ActionStrategy Map Strategic Theme: Strategic Theme: Objectives Measures Targets Initiatives Operations Efficiency Operating Excellence Profits and Financial RONA • Profitability • 30% CAGR Grow Fewer planes • Grow Revenues • 20% CAGR Revenues • Fewer planes • 5% CAGR Attract & Customer Retain More • More Customers • # Customers • 12% growth •Customer Customers • Flight is on -time • FAA On Time • Ranked #1 loyalty On-time Lowest • Lowest prices Arrival Rating • Ranked #1 program Service prices • Market Survey • Quality management Internal • On Ground Time • 30 Minutes • Cycle time • Fast ground Fast ground turnaround • On-Time • 90% optimization turnaround Departure Learning • Ground crew • % Ground crew • yr. 1 70% • Ground crew alignment trained yr. 3 90% training Ground crew yr. 5 100% alignment • % Ground crew • ESOP stockholders
  • Metric Terminology (Southwest Airlines Example)Strategy Map Strategic Theme: Objectives: Measures: Targets: Initiatives: Operating Efficiency What the How success The level of Key action Profits and strategy is or failure performance programs Financial RONA trying to (performance) or rate of required to Grow achieve against improvement achieve Fewer planes Revenues objectives is needed targets Attract & monitored Customer Retain More Customers On-time Lowest Service prices Internal Objectives Measures Targets Initiatives Fast ground • On Ground Time • 30 Minutes • Cycle time turnaround • Fast ground turnaround • On-Time • 90% optimization Departure Learning Ground crew alignment
  • Optional Elements - EPDP Recognizing Past Performance Service Plan Reference Career Plan (i.e. where you want to go in the future) Supervisor Commitments (i.e. resource and/or support needs) Additional accomplishments 34
  • Performance Management Cycle April November April Plan Focus Review/Plan EPDP 2005/06 EPDP REVIEW 2005/06Key Work Goals Key Work Goals EPDP 2006/07 Key Work Goals 360 degreeKey Competencies feedback Key Competencies (optional)Personal Learning PersonalPlan Key Competencies Personal Learning 35 Plan
  • Integrated performance management framework - elements & linkages Gov’t Strategic Plan, Ministry Plan, Branch Plan Individual Start of year Performance Management Plan Review • Goal Setting CorporateOutcomes Opportunities•Recognition Review •Career Planmechanisms (e.g.informal and • Results Focus •High Potentialformal rewards and • Feedback to • Progress and •Succession Plan recognition,development, base develop new realignment •Learning Needs pay, pay for En plan g & Courses performance do oin fy ng ea O 36 r Competencies
  • Performance Tools and resources Written Overall Guidelines Employee Guidelines Supervisor Guidelines Sample EPDP Templates (Forms) EPDP Examples Employee Checklist Supervisor Checklist Tips on Giving and Receiving Feedback Frequently Asked Questions 37
  • Performance On-line Web-based interactive tool Supports employee performance & development planning Other resources include: – Competency development – Building self-awareness – Team building – Career planning 38
  • Getting Started 39
  • Challenges to performance management Lack of current divisional/branch plan Belief that a job description is required Competencies not established for the job Succinctly identifying 3-8 key goals Identifying ‘measurable’ measures/targets Measuring advice and support roles Linking high level goals to daily work Too busy to develop plan and meet with supervisor It’s time intensive and hard to do 40
  • Practicing Goal Setting Identify the 3-8 key areas your are expected to get results in your job Practice writing a goal statement with objectives, strategies and measures – Measures e.g.: time, quality, quantity, cost What are the key competencies required for your job? What can you develop/learn in the upcoming year? 41
  • Next steps Review the Guidelines Develop a draft EPDP Book a meeting with your supervisor to discuss and finalize 42
  • Linking our individual plans to corporate plans equals high performance results! 43
  • Your performance tools 44
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