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Ccot from first civs to classical civs
Ccot from first civs to classical civs
Ccot from first civs to classical civs
Ccot from first civs to classical civs
Ccot from first civs to classical civs
Ccot from first civs to classical civs
Ccot from first civs to classical civs
Ccot from first civs to classical civs
Ccot from first civs to classical civs
Ccot from first civs to classical civs
Ccot from first civs to classical civs
Ccot from first civs to classical civs
Ccot from first civs to classical civs
Ccot from first civs to classical civs
Ccot from first civs to classical civs
Ccot from first civs to classical civs
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Ccot from first civs to classical civs

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  • 1. Similarities in the 4 Early Civs
    Tigris-Euphrates = Sumerian, Mesopotamian
    Egyptian
    Indus Valley
    China = Shang dynasty
  • 2. Similarities in the 4 Early Civs
    Government –
    government and religions were connected
    Empire – central government controlled, often through force, several groups or societies and their territories
    Dynastic cycle in Egypt and China
  • 3. Similarities in the 4 Early Civs
    Economics
    Agricultural goods were the basis of the economy.
    Government regulation of trade.
    People paid taxes in labor or products.
  • 4. Similarities in the 4 Early Civs
    Religion –
    Polytheism
    Based on forms of sacrifice and rituals
    Social classes –
    Small group of people in upper class, large numbers in lower classes.
    Warriors and priests were the top class – government workers and merchants sometimes formed a small “middle class”
  • 5. Similarities in the 4 Early Civs
    By 1000 bce, the four civilizations were in decline.
  • 6. What Changed and What Didn’t?
    After the First Civilizations…
  • 7. Classical India
  • 8. China under the Han Dynasty
  • 9. Greek City-States
  • 10. Roman Empire
  • 11.
  • 12. Monarchs continued to rule most of the new civilizations
    Men continued to dominate women
    A sharp divide between the elite and everyone else persisted almost everywhere
    The practice of slavery
    No fundamental or revolutionary transformation of social or economic life took place (until the Industrial Revolution)
    What Stayed the Same?
  • 13. Population grew more rapidly
    The growing size of the states or empires that structured civilizations (much larger than the city-states of Mesopotamia or Egypt under the pharaohs)
    New philosophical/religious traditions (Confucianism, Daoism, Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, Zoroastrianism, and Christianity)
    What Changed?
  • 14. Technological innovations to help humans manipulate the environment (China-bellows, loom, silk making, wheelbarrow, harness, crossbow, iron casting; India-sugar, cotton; Rome-aqueducts, roads)
    Emergence of more elaborate, widespread, and dense networks of exchange and communication (Indian Ocean, Silk Road)
    Long-distance trade
    What Changed?
  • 15. Many countries, regions, and civilizations still link their identities to the achievements of the Classical Era!
    Persia, Greece, Rome, Qin/Han China, Mauryan/Gupta India
    The Classical Civilizations (600 B.C.E to 600 C.E.)
  • 16. Focus for AP WORLD History
    Major political developments
    Social and gender structures
    Major trading patterns within the civilizations and between the civilizations
    Arts, sciences, and technology
    Development of traditions and institutions

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