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Population,geo
Population,geo
Population,geo
Population,geo
Population,geo
Population,geo
Population,geo
Population,geo
Population,geo
Population,geo
Population,geo
Population,geo
Population,geo
Population,geo
Population,geo
Population,geo
Population,geo
Population,geo
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Population,geo

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Transcript

  • 1. SOCIAL SCIENCE ASSIGNMENT POPULATION
  • 2. RAPID POPULATION GROWTH, PHASE ONE: 14501650 Around 1450, population increased rapidly in East Asia, Europe, and probably India. Signs of growth also are apparent in other densely settled regions, such as Egypt. Soon total world population reached new highs, and this time, numbers never again dipped below pre-1450 levels. A slight decline occurred in the late 1600s, but by 1700 world population was at least 600,000,000 people.
  • 3. RAPID POPULATION GROWTH, PHASE TWO: 1700 2000 • By the mid-1700s, China, Japan, and Western Europe had reached new population highs and were experiencing faster growth than ever before. Thereafter, these regions experienced only temporary and slight population declines. In the 1800s, most of the rest of the world followed suit, crashing through old population ceilings. Overall world population reached about 950,000,000 by 1800, about 1,650,000,000 by 1900, and is almost 6,000,000,000 today. The rate of growth was perhaps 0.3 percent per year in the 1700s, between 0.5 and 0.6 percent in the 1800s, and a stunning 1.5 percent in the 1900s. Some countries have experienced growth rates of more than 3 percent per year, doubling their population in roughly 23 years. .
  • 4. ********************************* COMPILED BY: ABHISHEK SINGH IX B ************************** SUBMITTED TO: MRS SHASHI KIRAN SADAWARTI

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