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Disaster Management
Disaster Management
Disaster Management
Disaster Management
Disaster Management
Disaster Management
Disaster Management
Disaster Management
Disaster Management
Disaster Management
Disaster Management
Disaster Management
Disaster Management
Disaster Management
Disaster Management
Disaster Management
Disaster Management
Disaster Management
Disaster Management
Disaster Management
Disaster Management
Disaster Management
Disaster Management
Disaster Management
Disaster Management
Disaster Management
Disaster Management
Disaster Management
Disaster Management
Disaster Management
Disaster Management
Disaster Management
Disaster Management
Disaster Management
Disaster Management
Disaster Management
Disaster Management
Disaster Management
Disaster Management
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Disaster Management

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HERE IS AN OUTSTANDING PRESENTATION BY PPT MASTERS ON THE TOPIC DISASTER MANAGEMENT WITH ATTRACTIVE TRANSITIONS AND MORE THAN ENOUGH CONTENT

HERE IS AN OUTSTANDING PRESENTATION BY PPT MASTERS ON THE TOPIC DISASTER MANAGEMENT WITH ATTRACTIVE TRANSITIONS AND MORE THAN ENOUGH CONTENT

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  • 1.          Introduction to a Disasters Causes of Disasters Effects of Disasters Types of Disasters Natural Disasters -Earthquakes ,Flood , Lightning ,Storms ,Tornado ,Volcanic Eruptions , Tsunami ,Forest Fire ,Drought Man Made Disasters –Explosions ,Terrorism Industrial Disasters ,Structural collapse Radiation Contamination ,Gas Leakage Transportation Disaster Management Principles of Disaster Management Importance of Disaster Management
  • 2. A disaster is a natural or man-made (or technological) hazard resulting in an event of substantial extent causing significant physical damage or destruction, loss of life, or drastic change to the environment. A disaster can beostensively defined as any tragic event stemming from events such as earthquakes, floods, catastrophic acciden ts, fires, or explosions. It is a phenomenon that can cause damage to life, property and destroy the economic, social and cultural life of people.
  • 3. For some natural disasters like floods and volcanoes ,advance warning may be there for others like earthquakes ,tsunami no warnings whereas man made disasters like explosions , nuclear or gas leakages ,wars , terrorism act etc are always a human error and we are the one who causes some of these dangerous and vigorous man made calamities to the nature and to mankind.
  • 4.        Deaths Property loss Disabilities Increase in Communicable Diseases Psychological Problems Food Shortage Socioeconomic Loses  Shortage of Drugs and Medical Supplies  Environmental Disruption
  • 5.       Predictability Controllability Speed of Onset Length of Fore warming Duration of Impact Scope of Intensity of Impact
  • 6. An earthquake (also known as a quake, tremor or temblor) is the result of a sudden release of energy in the Earth’s crust that creates seismic waves. The seismicity, seismism or seismic activity of an area refers to the frequency, type and size of earthquakes experienced over a period of time. Earthquakes are measured using observations from seismometers. The moment magnitude is the most common scale on which earthquakes larger than approximately 5 are reported for the entire globe. The more numerous earthquakes smaller than magnitude 5 reported by national seismological observatories are measured mostly on the local magnitude scale, also referred to as the Richter scale.
  • 7. A flood is an overflow of water that submerges land. The European Union (EU) Floods Directive defines a flood as a covering by water of land not normally covered by water. In the sense of "flowing water", the word may also be applied to the inflow of the tide. Flooding may result from the volume of water within a body of water, such as a river or lake, which overflows or breaks levees, with the result that some of the water escapes its usual boundaries, or may be due to accumulation of rainwater on saturated ground in an areal flood.
  • 8. Lightning is a massive electrostatic discharge caused by unbalanced electric charge in the atmosphere. Lightning can be either inside clouds (IC), cloud to cloud (CC) or cloud to ground (CG) and is accompanied by the loud sound of thunder. Because the speed of sound in air (~340 m/s) is so much slower than the speed of light (300,000,000 m/s) from the lightning flash the distance to a lightning strike can be closely approximated by dividing the flash-thunder interval, T (sec) by 3-T(sec)/3 = km distance or T(sec)/5 = mile distance. Thunder often lasts several seconds because the sounds from different
  • 9. A Storm is any disturbed state of an astronomical body's atmosphere, especially affecting its surface, and strongly implying severe weather. It may be marked by strong wind, hail, thunder and/or lightning (a thunders torm), heavy precipitation (snowstorm, rainstorm), hea vy freezing rain (ice storm), strong winds (tropical cyclone, windstorm) or wind transporting some substance through the atmosphere (as in a dust storm, blizzard, sandstorm, etc.). Storms generally lead to negative impacts to lives and property, such as storm surge, heavy rain or snow (causing flooding or road impassibility), lightning, wildfires, and vertical wind shear; however, systems with significant rainfall can alleviate drought in places they move through.
  • 10. A tornado is a violently rotating column of air that is in contact with both the surface of the earth and a cumulonimbus cloud or, in rare cases, the base of a cumulus cloud. They are often referred to as twisters or cyclones, although the word cyclone is used in meteorology, in a wider sense, to name any closed low pressure circulation. Tornadoes come in many shapes and sizes, but they are typically in the form of a visible condensation funnel, whose narrow end touches the earth and is often encircled by a cloud of debris and dust. Most tornadoes have wind speeds less than 110 miles per hour (177 km/h), are about 250 feet (76 m) across, and travel a few miles (several kilometres) before dissipating. The most extreme tornadoes can attain wind speeds of more than 300 miles per hour (483 km/h), stretch more than two miles (3.2 km) across, and stay on the ground for dozens of miles (more than 100 km).
  • 11. During a volcanic eruption, lava, tephra (ash, lapilli, volcanic bombs and blocks), and various gases are expelled from a volcanic vent or fissure. Several types of volcanic eruptions have been distinguished by volcanologists. These are often named after famous volcanoes where that type of behaviour has been observed. Some volcanoes may exhibit only one characteristic type of eruption during a period of activity, while others may display an entire sequence of types all in one eruptive series.
  • 12. A Tsunami is a series of water waves caused by the displacement of a large volume of a body of water, typically an ocean or a large lake. Earthquakes, volcanic eruptions and other underwater explosions (including detonations of underwater nuclear devices), landslides, glacier calving, meteorite impacts and other disturbances above or below water all have the potential to generate a tsunami.
  • 13. A wildfire is any uncontrolled fire in combustible vegetation that occurs in the countryside or a wilderness area, Other names such as brush fire, bushfire, forest fire, desert fire, grass fire, hill fire, peat fire, vegetation fire, and hellfire may be used to describe the same phenomenon depending on the type of vegetation being burned. A wildfire differs from other fires by its extensive size, the speed at which it can spread out from its original source, its potential to change direction unexpectedly, and its ability to jump gaps such as roads, rivers and fire breaks. Wildfires are characterized in terms of the cause of ignition, their physical properties such as speed of propagation, the combustible material present, and the effect of weather on the fire.
  • 14. A drought is an extended period of months or years when a region notes a deficiency in its water supply whether surface or underground water. Generally, this occurs when a region receives consistently below average precipitation. It can have a substantial impact on the ecosystem and agriculture of the affected region. Although droughts can persist for several years, even a short, intense drought can cause significant damage and harm the local economy.
  • 15. An explosion is a rapid increase in volume and release of energy in an extreme manner, usually with the generation of high temperatures and the release of gases . Supersonic explosions created by high explosives are known as detonations, and travel via supersonic shock waves. Subsonic explosions are created by low explosives through a slower burning process known as deflagration.
  • 16. Terrorism is the systematic use of terror, especially as a means of coercion. In the international community, however, terrorism has no universally agreed, legally binding, criminal law definition .Common definitions of terrorism refer only to those violent acts which are intended to create fear (terror), are perpetrated for a religious, political or, ideological goal; and deliberately target or disregard the safety of non-combatants (civilians). Some definitions now include acts of unlawful violence and war. The use of similar tactics by criminal organizations for protection rackets or to enforce a code of silence is usually not labelled terrorism though these same actions may be labelled terrorism when done by a politically motivated group.
  • 17. This article lists notable industrial disasters, which are disasters caused by industrial companies, either by accident, negligence or incompetence. They are a form of industrial accident where great damage, injury or loss of life are caused. Other disasters can also be considered industrial disasters, if their causes are rooted in the products or processes of industry. For example, the Great Chicago Fire of 1871 was made more severe due to the heavy concentration of lumber industry, wood houses, fuel and other chemicals in a small area.
  • 18. Structural failure refers to loss of the load-carrying capacity of a component or member within a structure or of the structure itself. Structural failure is initiated when the material is stressed to its strength limit, thus causing fracture or excessive deformations. In a well-designed system, a localized failure should not cause immediate or even progressive collapse of the entire structure. Ultimate failure strength is one of the limit states that must be accounted for in structural engineering and structural design.
  • 19. Radioactive contamination, also called radiological contamination, is radioactive substances on surfaces, or within solids, liquids or gases (including the human body), where their presence is unintended or undesirable, or the process giving rise to their presence in such places. Also used less formally to refer to a quantity, namely the activity on a surface (or on a unit area of a surface). As with other contamination, radioactive contamination refers only to the presence of the unintended or undesired radioactivity, and gives no indication of the magnitude of hazard involved.
  • 20. In common usage, a gas leak refers to a leak of natural gas, from a pipe or other containment, into a living area or any other area where the gas should not be. As natural gas may explode when exposed to flame or sparks, this situation is dangerous. One of the main gas disasters of the world was the Bhopal gas tragedy. The Bhopal disaster, also referred to as the Bhopal gas tragedy, was a gas leak incident in India, considered one of the world's worst industrial disasters. It occurred on the night of 2–3 December 1984 at the Union Carbide India Limited (UCIL) pesticide plant in Bhopal, Madhya Pradesh. A leak of methyl is ocyanate gas and other chemicals from the plant resulted in the exposure of hundreds of thousands of people. The toxic substance made its way in and around the shantytowns located near the plant. Estimates vary on the death toll. The official immediate death toll was 2,259 and the government of Madhya Pradesh has confirmed a total of 3,787 deaths related to the gas release. Others estimate 8,000 died within two weeks and another 8,000 or more have since died from gas-related diseases. A government affidavit in 2006 stated the leak caused 558,125 injuries including 38,478 temporary partial and approximately 3,900 severely and permanently disabling injuries.
  • 21. An aviation incident is an occurrence other than an accident, associated with the operation of an aircraft, which affects or could affect the safety of operations, passengers, or pilots. The category of the vehicle can range from a helicopter, an airliner, or a space shuttle. The world's worst airliner disaster is the Tenerife crash of 1977, when miscommunications between and amongst air traffic control and an aircrew caused two fully laden jets to collide on the runway, killing 583 people.
  • 22. A railroad disaster is an occurrence associated with the operation of a passenger train which results in substantial loss of life. Usually accidents with freight (goods) trains are not considered disasters, unless they cause substantial loss of life or property. One of the most devastating rail disasters occurred in 2004 in Sri Lanka when 1,700 people died in the Sri Lanka tsunami-rail disaster. Other notable rail disasters are the 1989 Ufa accident in Russia which killed 574, and the 1917 Madame train accident in France which killed 540.
  • 23. A traffic collision, also known as a traffic accident, motor vehicle collision, motor vehicle accident, car accident, automobile accident, Road Traffic Collision (RTC), car crash, or car smash (Australian) occurs when a vehicle collides with another vehicle, pedestrian, animal, road debris, or other stationary obstruction, such as a tree or utility pole. Traffic collisions may result in injury, death, vehicle damage and property damage.
  • 24. Ships can sink, capsize or crash in disasters. Perhaps the most infamous sinking was that of the Titanic which hit an iceberg and sank, resulting in one of the worst maritime disasters in history. Other notable incidents include the capsizing of the Costa Concordia, which killed at least 32 people; and is the largest passenger ship to sink, and the sinking of the MV Doña Paz, which claimed the lives of up to 4,375 people, making it the worst peacetime maritime disaster in history.
  • 25. Natural disasters, pandemics and other types of major emergency have widespread human impacts. Physical therapists can and do have a significant role to play in helping those affected by such disasters. WCPT is committed to promoting physical therapists engagement at the organisational level when disasters strike, and to supporting member organisations with information to guide physical therapists so that they are well prepared and appropriately supported for being involved in disaster management.
  • 26. Disaster management is the responsibility of all spheres of government  Disaster management should use resources that exist for a day to day purpose  Organizations should function as an extension for there core business  Individuals are responsible for their own safety  Disaster management planning should focus on Large Scale Events  Disaster management planning should recognize the difference between incidents and disasters  Disaster management operational arrangements are additiona to and do not replace incident management operational arrangements 
  • 27. Good prevention might include the construction of flood levees ,relocation of housing and essential services away from floodway ,use of better building standards or hazardous waste regulation
  • 28. Through good preparation ,the effects of disasters and significant incidents can often be reduced .Information and education for the public about hazards .This will help communities to take action to protect themselves ,their families and property from harm .Planning and community involvement in the planning is most important in preparing for disasters
  • 29. In major emergencies it is critical that an efficient and effective disaster response can be mobilized .Response is a collective responsibility .In a major emergency or disaster ,people need to know what to do ,who will do it and how it will be done .The ability to respond quickly and effectively will depend on good preparation .If a response plan has been developed thought fully ,included the community ‟sinews ,been communicated clearly and has been based on a realistic availability of resources ,it is likely to succeed.
  • 30. Recovery from major disaster can be along and costly process .Essential services such as water and power may need to be restored ,additional medical services may be required or temporary housing and family support may be needed .Businesses and the economy could be badly affected and need support to recover .Recovery from disaster will also be most effective then it has been thought about in advance .Generally ,major disasters will require assistance from outside the community .Awareness of emergency relief funding programs and strengthening the links with national disaster relief organisations may assist
  • 31. Disaster planning is about anticipating the types of disasters that may occur and the effect on communities .It is about drawing on the wisdom of the community and experts to develop ways to prevent ,prepare for ,respond to and recover from those disasters .Disaster management planning is a collective responsibility .Governments ,communities and private sector need to work together so that knowledge ,resources and effort are used to minimize the effects of disaster on communities ,the economy and the environment .
  • 32. THANK YOU

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