INTRODUCTION TO GRID COMPUTING<br />-BY ABHIJEET NAWAL<br />B.E.(Honors), CSE<br />MBM ENGG. COLLEGE<br />(www.mbm.ac.in)<...
WHY GRID - PROBLEMDOMAINS:<br /><ul><li>There are some large scale problems which require analysis of high volumes of data...
Such problems thus need computing resources (say processing power of the order of teraflops, secure dependable networks an...
Some Such Problems:</li></ul> 	1) High Energy Physics Experiments (E.g. LHC)<br />	2) Earthquake Simulation Experiments<br...
GRIDS AND THEIR TYPES:<br /><ul><li>Grid is an infrastructure that involves the integrated and collaborative use of comput...
Grid resources may be owned and managed by multiple organizations often heterogeneous (platforms, operating systems) and g...
Computational Grid: Main computing resource shared – Processing Power.
Data Grid: Main computing resource shared – Storage. Provides fast and secure access to distributed, heterogeneous pools o...
Network Grid: Main purpose to provide fault-tolerant and high performance communication.</li></li></ul><li> COMPUTING APPR...
WHAT ARE GRID REQUIREMENTS:<br /><ul><li>Remote Storage and Replication of data sets.
Publication and discovery of data sets using global logical name.
Security- access authorization and authentication.
Discovery and Unified access and view of Remote Resources taking into account their local access policies.
Mapping and Scheduling of Jobs.
Movement of Code/Data  between the user desktop machines and distributed resources.
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Introduction to Grid Computing

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Introduction to Grid Computing

  1. 1. INTRODUCTION TO GRID COMPUTING<br />-BY ABHIJEET NAWAL<br />B.E.(Honors), CSE<br />MBM ENGG. COLLEGE<br />(www.mbm.ac.in)<br />
  2. 2. WHY GRID - PROBLEMDOMAINS:<br /><ul><li>There are some large scale problems which require analysis of high volumes of data (of the order of petabytes) to derive an inference.
  3. 3. Such problems thus need computing resources (say processing power of the order of teraflops, secure dependable networks and storage) often for which even a supercomputer does not suffice.
  4. 4. Some Such Problems:</li></ul> 1) High Energy Physics Experiments (E.g. LHC)<br /> 2) Earthquake Simulation Experiments<br /> 3) Drug Discovery<br /> 4) Weather Modeling<br /><ul><li> Grid aims to provide a cost effective, scalable and reliable computing platform to such grand challenge data intensive problems.</li></li></ul><li>WHAT IS A GRID:<br />
  5. 5. GRIDS AND THEIR TYPES:<br /><ul><li>Grid is an infrastructure that involves the integrated and collaborative use of computers, networks, databases and scientific instruments.
  6. 6. Grid resources may be owned and managed by multiple organizations often heterogeneous (platforms, operating systems) and geographically dispersed in nature.
  7. 7. Computational Grid: Main computing resource shared – Processing Power.
  8. 8. Data Grid: Main computing resource shared – Storage. Provides fast and secure access to distributed, heterogeneous pools of data.
  9. 9. Network Grid: Main purpose to provide fault-tolerant and high performance communication.</li></li></ul><li> COMPUTING APPROACHES:<br />
  10. 10. WHAT ARE GRID REQUIREMENTS:<br /><ul><li>Remote Storage and Replication of data sets.
  11. 11. Publication and discovery of data sets using global logical name.
  12. 12. Security- access authorization and authentication.
  13. 13. Discovery and Unified access and view of Remote Resources taking into account their local access policies.
  14. 14. Mapping and Scheduling of Jobs.
  15. 15. Movement of Code/Data between the user desktop machines and distributed resources.
  16. 16. Enforcement of Quality of service requirements.
  17. 17. Metering and Accounting of resource usage.
  18. 18. Failure Detection and Failover Mechanisms.</li></li></ul><li>Virtual Organizations and Resource Sharing:<br />Software Application Provider<br />Weather<br />Prediction<br />Problem A<br />Dynamic Virtual Organization A<br />formed to provide weather prediction<br />Weather prediction<br />Math Modeling<br />Application<br />Hardware Service Provider<br />User<br />Computer<br />Cluster<br />Virtual organizations are<br /><ul><li>Logical entities
  19. 19. Dynamically created to solve a specific problem
  20. 20. On-demand resource allocation and provisioning for solving the problem</li></ul>Network<br />Bandwith<br />Blades<br />…<br />resources<br />User<br />Financial Expert Service Provider<br />Dynamic Virtual Organization B<br />formed to solve a financial modeling<br />Financial<br />Modeling<br />Problem B<br />Financial Modeling<br />Database<br />System<br />
  21. 21. Virtual Organizations Continue..<br /><ul><li> The concept of the VO is the key to grid computing.
  22. 22. A virtual organization (VO) is a dynamic group of individuals, groups, or organizations who define the conditions and rules (business objectives and policies) for sharing resources.
  23. 23. Although the resources in a grid might be in separate administrative domains, they are made available as virtual local resources to any node on the grid.
  24. 24. Dynamically collect resources from different providers based upon the users’ needs or urgency and the priority of the problem.
  25. 25. Identify problems, linking them to required resources or service providers, and automatically resolve them.
  26. 26. Dynamically provision and manage the resources meeting QoS (Quality Of Service) while not violating SLAs and local autonomy of resource usage.</li></li></ul><li>GRID ARCHITECTURE:<br />
  27. 27. GRID COMPUTING OPERTIONAL VIEW:<br />END USER APPLICATION INTERFACE<br />1<br />GRID MARKET<br />DIRECTORY<br />4<br />2<br />Results and Cost Info.<br />6. Jobs<br />GRID RESOURCE BROKER<br />RESOURCES<br />7. Results<br />3<br />5<br />GRID INFORMATION SERVICE<br />ACCOUNTING AND METERING SYSTEM<br />
  28. 28. OPERATIONAL VIEW CONTINUE..<br /><ul><li>1. User interacts with the Grid System through the Interface.
  29. 29. 2. Submission of the user’s Quality of Service (QoS) and Computing needs to Grid Resource Broker (GRB)
  30. 30. 3. GRB discovers resources and characteristics using Grid Information Service (GIS).
  31. 31. 4. GRB identifies resource prices from Grid Market Directory (GMD)
  32. 32. 5. GRB ensures user’s credit and authorization privileges.
  33. 33. 6. GRB’S scheduler maps and deploys data analysis jobs to QoS meeting resources.
  34. 34. 7. GRB collates the results and account usage and cost information to the user. </li></li></ul><li>WHAT ARE THE BENEFITS:<br /><ul><li>Technically:
  35. 35. Exploiting under utilized resources
  36. 36. Access to additional resources
  37. 37. Resource Balancing
  38. 38. Parallel CPU capacity
  39. 39. Scalability
  40. 40. Socially:
  41. 41. Resources can be harnessed for the good of society. For eg grids for drug discovery.
  42. 42. Commercially:
  43. 43. An opportunity to create a large processing center and sell its capabilities to customers.
  44. 44. This frees the customers from the need to purchase, configure, and manage their own large network of computers. Where large computing jobs are infrequent enough that renting is less expensive than purchasing computers. Eg: multi-player gaming grid –SECOND LIFE.</li></li></ul><li>GRID COMPUTING: FUTURE<br /><ul><li>GRID INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT
  45. 45. GRID MIDDLEWARE RESEARCH
  46. 46. STANDARIZATION -to allow interoperability between different products and implementations.</li></ul>Open Grid Service Infrastructure (OGSI) standard .<br />WSRF (Web Services Resource Framework) standard that enables Web services integration within Grid Architecture. This allows Grid Developers to take advantage of standard message formats and communication mechanisms such as HTTP and XML for communicating between heterogeneous components and architectures. <br />
  47. 47. REFERENCES:<br /><ul><li>“Weaving computational grids : How analogous are they with Electrical grids” by MadhuChetty and RajkumarBuyya.
  48. 48. “A gentle introduction to grid computing and technologies’- RajkumarBuyya and SrikumarVenugopal.
  49. 49. “Grid computing- a brief technology analysis”- Roger Smith.
  50. 50. “Introduction to Grid Computing”- IBM Redbooks.</li></li></ul><li>THANK YOU<br />
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