Girl bullying

278 views
172 views

Published on

If anyone wants to purchase this ppt,he/she can contact on abheygpt1@gmail.com

Published in: Career
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
278
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
6
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Girl bullying

  1. 1. Girl Bullying: Helping mean girls make nice Unpacking Relational Aggression and Bullying among Girls Abhey Gupta Original material copyright 2008 Dr. April Foreman all rights reserved. All other copyrights and trademarks are the property of their respective holders. www.docforeman.com
  2. 2. Why are we here?  Why *I* am here  Why this workshop is important?  Recent news in “girl bullying”  Why are *you* here? Check you pen color. Original material copyright 2008 Dr. April Foreman all rights reserved. All other
  3. 3. What do we mean by “Girl Bullying?” Original material copyright 2008 Dr. April Foreman all rights reserved. All other
  4. 4. Helpful Terms  Social Aggression  Relational Aggression  Put your head down and cover your eyes. Why might these forms of aggression be particularly appealing to girls? Original material copyright 2008 Dr. April Foreman all rights reserved. All other
  5. 5. Gender and Aggression  All children feel anger, jealousy, competition and aggression.  Girls are socialized to avoid expressing these feelings directly.  All girls (and all boys) engage in relational and social aggression from time to time.  Not all aggression is negative.  Not all aggression is bullying. Original material copyright 2008 Dr. April Foreman all rights reserved. All other
  6. 6. “Girl” Bullying is  Repeated actions against a target  Intentionally harmful to target  Power imbalance between aggressor and target  We *expect* this kind of behavior among girls. But we do not *accept* it. Original material copyright 2008 Dr. April Foreman all rights reserved. All other
  7. 7. Girl bullying is a predictable phenomenon  All girls use relational and social aggression.  But not all girls have a pattern of bullying.  And not all girls are likely targets.  Group Process Activity Original material copyright 2008 Dr. April Foreman all rights reserved. All other
  8. 8. Unpacking our Emotional Baggage (Adapted from Wiseman, 2002)  Where did you fit in middle school?  Where did you fit in high school?  What did you get from being part of this group?  Did you ever want to leave the clique but felt like you couldn’t?  Were you ever tormented by someone in a clique? Original material copyright 2008 Dr. April Foreman all rights reserved. All other
  9. 9. Continued:  Is there anyone you would run away from if you saw them now?  Did you ever feel trapped by a reputation you couldn’t shake?  Were you ever teased? About what? How did you handle it?  Did you spread gossip? Were you gossiped about? How did you handle it? Original material copyright 2008 Dr. April Foreman all rights reserved. All other
  10. 10. Characteristics of Girl Bullies  Tendency to prefer RA/SA over assertive behaviors  May use RA/SA for several reasons – – – – – Jealousy/Insecurity is #1 reason Maintain or build status/power Competition for attention from romantic interests Learned behaviors from role models and peers Entertainment, to alleviate boredom Original material copyright 2008 Dr. April Foreman all rights reserved. All other
  11. 11. Continued:  Good grooming and social skills  Wants to please authority figures and appear “nice”  Poorer internal emotional regulation  Hostile Interpersonal Attribution Bias Original material copyright 2008 Dr. April Foreman all rights reserved. All other
  12. 12. Continued:  Lower – – levels of empathy May be a precursor in developing Anti-Social Personality Disorder Gender Bias in Conduct Disorder criteria Original material copyright 2008 Dr. April Foreman all rights reserved. All other
  13. 13. Characteristics of Targets  Target vs. Victim  Three “Ds” – – – Different Dominant Disruptive  Most- and least-liked of peer cohort  May be less likely to “go along to get along” Original material copyright 2008 Dr. April Foreman all rights reserved. All other
  14. 14. Continued:  May have poorer social insight or social skills  May tend to be more comfortable with critical or direct feedback… “unvarnished truth”  Bully perceives target as a threat in some way  May have poorer emotional regulation… “push button temper” Original material copyright 2008 Dr. April Foreman all rights reserved. All other
  15. 15. Continued:  May have less experience with playful RA/SA  May have strong sense of justice… “whistle blower” Bottom Line: Not all bullies are the same and not all targets are the same Original material copyright 2008 Dr. April Foreman all rights reserved. All other
  16. 16. Common Techniques of RA Bullying  Gossiping  Teasing/Public Humiliation  Relational blackmail  Ostracism/Exclusion  Creating Paranoia  Pranks and technology Original material copyright 2008 Dr. April Foreman all rights reserved. All other
  17. 17. Cyberbullying  This is not really new, just a new medium.  Some research suggests 58% of girls know more about internet/computers than parents  Cellphones and texting more ubiquitous  Organized cyberbullying  Can happen in email, chat rooms, social networking sites, interactive gaming sites Original material copyright 2008 Dr. April Foreman all rights reserved. All other
  18. 18. Continued:  Cyberbullying enhances anonymity of bullies who do things they might not do IRL… They are more anonymous and more removed from target.  Cyberbullying enhances paranoia of targets  Internet allows broad abilities to access and distribute information quickly and easily Original material copyright 2008 Dr. April Foreman all rights reserved. All other
  19. 19. Terms to know  Troll  Sock Puppet  Flame  Leet Speak  Txt speak Original material copyright 2008 Dr. April Foreman all rights reserved. All other
  20. 20. Keep in mind:  Everything leaves a trace in Cyberspace that is never really deleted.  Most of the time it is easy to change email, and disconnect from antagonistic situations.  Everyone is *not* looking.  Slander, Libel, Defamation, Fraud Original material copyright 2008 Dr. April Foreman all rights reserved. All other
  21. 21. Tips for Addressing Cyberbullying  No unmoderated/unsupervised internet use  Parents/supervisor have all passwords, total access, and actually *supervise* internet use  Need help deciphering? Google and Wikipedia are your friends  Harassers can be blocked, deleted, and avoided. Original material copyright 2008 Dr. April Foreman all rights reserved. All other
  22. 22. More tips:  Reporting harassment and cyberbullying is getting easier.  Adopt two important IRL rules: – – NO identifying IRL information goes on-line No on-line behaviors that would not be acceptable IRL  There are new laws about cyberbullying in Missouri. Original material copyright 2008 Dr. April Foreman all rights reserved. All other
  23. 23. If you read further down that article… “The Missouri measure also requires school officials to tell police about harassment and stalking on school grounds and expands state laws against stalking to cover "credible threats" not only against the victim but against family and household members and animals…” Original material copyright 2008 Dr. April Foreman all rights reserved. All other
  24. 24. Outcomes of Bullying  Peer rejection  Maladaptive internalizing and/or externalizing of problems  Depressive symptoms and suicidal ideation  Loneliness  Obesity  Eating Disorders Original material copyright 2008 Dr. April Foreman all rights reserved. All other
  25. 25. Outcomes continued:  Substance abuse and addiction  Romantic and relationship problems  Personality Disorders  Dislike of women in general… “I’m a woman, and I think women are generally bad.”  Poor self-esteem  Contagion…RA/SA is interpersonally transmitted. If you allow it, it spreads. Original material copyright 2008 Dr. April Foreman all rights reserved. All other
  26. 26. Bottom line:  Understanding RA/SA helps us understand a significant factor in the adjustment problems in girls. Original material copyright 2008 Dr. April Foreman all rights reserved. All other
  27. 27. The Ophelia Project and Related Efforts Campaigns for saving our girls Original material copyright 2008 Dr. April Foreman all rights reserved. All other copyrights and trademarks are the property of their respective holders. www.docforeman.com
  28. 28. Recent attention on Girl Bullying  Attention to RA/SA, Girl Bullying picked up in the 1990s.  Mary Pipher and The Ophelia Project  “Mean Girls” movement – – Tina Fey Rosalind Wiseman  Academic research and the popular media Original material copyright 2008 Dr. April Foreman all rights reserved. All other
  29. 29. Tomorrow: Recognizing and Intervening in Girl Bullying Meeting the needs of Bullies, Targets, and Girls in the Middle Original material copyright 2008 Dr. April Foreman all rights reserved. All other copyrights and trademarks are the property of their respective holders. www.docforeman.com
  30. 30. Girl Bullying: Helping mean girls make nice Meeting the needs of Bullies, Targets, and Girls in the Middle April C. Foreman, Ph.D. Original material copyright 2008 Dr. April Foreman all rights reserved. All other copyrights and trademarks are the property of their respective holders. www.docforeman.com
  31. 31. Archetypes from Childhood Original material copyright 2008 Dr. April Foreman all rights reserved. All other
  32. 32. What the Stepsisters are Feeling Original material copyright 2008 Dr. April Foreman all rights reserved. All other
  33. 33. Relational Bullying in our own Childhoods     What was yesterday like for you? What surprising reactions did you have? What insights did you have? What do you need today? Original material copyright 2008 Dr. April Foreman all rights reserved. All other
  34. 34. Queen Bees & Wannabes  Rosalind Wiseman, 2002  Basis of “Mean Girls” movie  Most common taxonomy for classifying roles of girl bullying  My most recommended resource for *parents* of girls facing problems related to relational aggression Original material copyright 2008 Dr. April Foreman all rights reserved. All other
  35. 35. WARNING:  Withholding judgment is important  Interventions are much less effective when we judge the people we are trying to help.  Perspective taking makes a difference  Motivations and functions of roles Original material copyright 2008 Dr. April Foreman all rights reserved. All other
  36. 36. Queen Bee  Other girls/peers do what she wants  Her complaints about others are limited to how “lame” they are  Exclusive vs. inclusive  Charming to adults…Eddie Haskell  Won’t take responsibility when she hurts others feelings Original material copyright 2008 Dr. April Foreman all rights reserved. All other
  37. 37. Queen Bee, continued  If she feels she has been wronged she feels justified in taking revenge  Often appears the “nicest”  Least likely to explicitly recognize her status  If you move her to a new environment, she’ll find new sidekicks and continue her behavior Original material copyright 2008 Dr. April Foreman all rights reserved. All other
  38. 38. Queen Bee: Benefits and Costs  Power and control over her environment  Attention and superficial admiration  Relies on her role for sense of self  May be at risk for less desirable psychological outcomes  Parents may value her role as “Queen Bee” and may not intervene Original material copyright 2008 Dr. April Foreman all rights reserved. All other
  39. 39. Sidekick  Lieutenant, Second-in-command  Power comes from Queen Bee  Most similar to Queen Bee  May execute bullying behaviors on behalf of the Queen Bee  More able to change behaviors if moved to a new environment Original material copyright 2008 Dr. April Foreman all rights reserved. All other
  40. 40. Sidekick: Benefits and Costs  Power over others, reflected status  Safest from bullying by Queen Bee  Feels popular and included  May be disconnected from her own identity  Highest risk of RA/SA contagion and consequences Original material copyright 2008 Dr. April Foreman all rights reserved. All other
  41. 41. Banker:  Collects gossip and uses it as relational currency  Strategic thinker  Secretive  Rarely the subject of conflict  Seems to be friends with everyone…treated like a pet Original material copyright 2008 Dr. April Foreman all rights reserved. All other
  42. 42. Banker, continued  May be a physical “late bloomer”  Sneaks under the radar because she appears cute and harmless Original material copyright 2008 Dr. April Foreman all rights reserved. All other
  43. 43. Banker: Benefits and Costs  Power and security  Other girls do not trust her  May appear “nice” but struggle with empathy Original material copyright 2008 Dr. April Foreman all rights reserved. All other
  44. 44. Floater  Friends in different groups  Passes easily from one group to another  Doesn’t have one of the the “3 Ds”  Nice, but not sophisticated; Pretty, but not beautiful  Avoids conflict  May have skills to stand up to Queen Bee Original material copyright 2008 Dr. April Foreman all rights reserved. All other
  45. 45. Floater  Inclusive vs. Exclusive  Moderate social power Original material copyright 2008 Dr. April Foreman all rights reserved. All other
  46. 46. Floater: Benefits and Costs  Better self-esteem  Identity less tied to any single group  Assertive and good negotiation skills  Can be an asset in resolving bullying  Not a reasonable role for girls who are truly exceptional or who, by their very nature will stand out or be more competitive Original material copyright 2008 Dr. April Foreman all rights reserved. All other
  47. 47. The Torn Bystander  “Girl in the Middle”  Doesn’t like what the Queen Bee does, but feels powerless to stop her  Often in situations where she feels she must choose between friends  Very easily influence by the clique  Tries to accommodate everyone Original material copyright 2008 Dr. April Foreman all rights reserved. All other
  48. 48. The Torn Bystander, continued  Can’t say, “No.”  “Goes along to get along” Original material copyright 2008 Dr. April Foreman all rights reserved. All other
  49. 49. The Torn Bystander: Benefits and Costs  Avoids being a target of bullying  Access to perks of popularity and status  Not well respected by anyone  Confused and insecure  Sacrificed identity  Reduces her threat to Queen Bee through playing down her strengths and abilities Original material copyright 2008 Dr. April Foreman all rights reserved. All other
  50. 50. Pleaser/Messenger/Wannabe  Similar to Sidekick and Torn Bystander, but without sense of security, or conflicting emotions  Identity comes from Queen Bee  Desperately needs clique’s approval  Always in the middle of the drama  Does the other girls’ dirty work Original material copyright 2008 Dr. April Foreman all rights reserved. All other
  51. 51. Pleaser/Messenger/Wannabe, con’t.  Loves gossip and prides herself on being “in the loop” Original material copyright 2008 Dr. April Foreman all rights reserved. All other
  52. 52. Pleaser/Messenger/Wannabe: Benefits and Costs  Feels included  Enjoys the energy of “the drama”  Lacks authenticity  Not well-respected by peers  Poor boundaries and assertiveness skills  Poor identity development Original material copyright 2008 Dr. April Foreman all rights reserved. All other
  53. 53. Target  Often has one or more of the “3 Ds”  Lack of social power or alliances  Feels helpless  Remember the list from yesterday? Original material copyright 2008 Dr. April Foreman all rights reserved. All other
  54. 54. Target: Benefits and Costs  May have objectivity and more secure friendships  Sense of self outside of clique  Doesn’t have as much to lose by standing up to Queen Bee  But may have other poor psychological outcomes Original material copyright 2008 Dr. April Foreman all rights reserved. All other
  55. 55. Social “Maps”  Clique maps Original material copyright 2008 Dr. April Foreman all rights reserved. All other
  56. 56. Activity  Break into groups by pen color  Develop a case study of “Girl Bullying”  Draw on your own experiences or professional dilemmas  Remove or alter any identifying information Original material copyright 2008 Dr. April Foreman all rights reserved. All other
  57. 57. Case Conceptualization  Trade case studies  Systematic Case Conceptualization: A guide to breaking down the components of girl bullying  Helps us with objectivity, perspective taking, and developing insight Original material copyright 2008 Dr. April Foreman all rights reserved. All other
  58. 58. Intervention: “12 Strategies that will end Girl Bullying”    Dellasega & Nixon, 2003 Education of kids, parents, teachers, helping professionals Prevention – – – – Teach and model a culture of care and empathy Teaching assertive conflict resolution skills Teaching benign interpersonal attribution bias Arranging a variety activities and opportunities for skill and self-esteem development Original material copyright 2008 Dr. April Foreman all rights reserved. All other
  59. 59. Intervention: “12 Strategies that will end Girl Bullying” – – – Some recommend encouraging girls to intervene in RA/SA when they see it. What do *you* think about this? The power of supervision: Redirection and distraction Helping girls identify their social power and using it to help and include less popular girls Original material copyright 2008 Dr. April Foreman all rights reserved. All other
  60. 60. Intervention: “12 Strategies that will end Girl Bullying”  Give – – – – – – girls the courage to be kind Teaching girls to evaluate relationships Developing a broad friendship network Holding girls accountable for RA/SA Encouraging girls to connect in ways that are kind instead of cruel. Do girls need to use exclusion to be a cohesive group, e.g.? Build self-confidence and self-esteem Teaching assertive skills to replace aggressive ones Original material copyright 2008 Dr. April Foreman all rights reserved. All other
  61. 61. Intervention: “12 Strategies that will end Girl Bullying”  Intervene – – – with the first hurts Respectful behavior contracts Safe spaces and safe people to turn to Help girls talk through RA when you observe it:  Who holds the power?  Who makes the rules?  How could the outcome be changed?  What would help a bystander take a stand?  Whose responsibility is it to change RA/bullying behaviors? Original material copyright 2008 Dr. April Foreman all rights reserved. All other
  62. 62. Intervention: “12 Strategies that will end Girl Bullying” – Avoid demonizing aggressors. They need help, too. Help them resolve issues that motivate RA/SA.  Avoid – – – – – the the blame game Don’t try to take over and “solve the problem” Adopt a “coaching” mentality www.sharonday.com Focus on the group, not the girl Listen first, act later Original material copyright 2008 Dr. April Foreman all rights reserved. All other
  63. 63. Intervention: “12 Strategies that will end Girl Bullying” – – – Attempt to maintain objectivity Deal with your own baggage Your number one job is to keep everyone safe  Enlist – the help of others When is professional help needed?  Changing – – the culture Raising awareness and advocacy Providing alternative ways of relating Original material copyright 2008 Dr. April Foreman all rights reserved. All other
  64. 64. Intervention: “12 Strategies that will end Girl Bullying”  Help girls find other outlets and opportunities  Soothe and support girls – – Validate instead of minimize hurts Encourage sharing of wisdom and experience  Tool kits of options for coping  Change the system: The personal is political Original material copyright 2008 Dr. April Foreman all rights reserved. All other
  65. 65. Intervention: Techniques suggested by research  Overt rules about RA/SA  In/out rule  Teaching assertive responses to disruptive children  Sensitizing parents to RA/SA in marital conflict  CBT with focus on decreasing hostile attribution bias Original material copyright 2008 Dr. April Foreman all rights reserved. All other
  66. 66. Intervention: Techniques suggested by research  Assertiveness skills training  Shaping clique distaste for/values about RA/SA – “Girls don’t like girls who…”  Reducing opportunities for boredom  Improve girls’ comfort with competition  Recognize and nurture girls who are good “defenders” Original material copyright 2008 Dr. April Foreman all rights reserved. All other
  67. 67. Intervention: Techniques suggested by research  Gossip – interruption 1st negative comment *must* be followed by challenging comment for benefit Original material copyright 2008 Dr. April Foreman all rights reserved. All other
  68. 68. Intervention: For Parents  Managerial – Choosing schools, activities, and social opportunites  Educational – practices practices Supervision, advice, consultation  Watch out for over-empathizing  Can the parent hear that his/her child is a bully/sidekick/wannabe/target? Original material copyright 2008 Dr. April Foreman all rights reserved. All other
  69. 69. Intervention: For Parents  Should parents call the parents of others involved?  Queen Bees & Wannabees, pg. 135-150 is a good response guide for parents Original material copyright 2008 Dr. April Foreman all rights reserved. All other
  70. 70. Intervention: For Schools  Whole – – – – – school policies “General statements” are not enough Concrete statements about what is acceptable Specific policies for faculty and students when bullying is suspected Focused programs for bullies and targets Focus on positive goals rather than punishing negative behaviors Original material copyright 2008 Dr. April Foreman all rights reserved. All other
  71. 71. Intervention: For Schools  Curricular interventions: Anti-bullying curriculum  Targeting individual aggressors and victims  Training teachers and staff in RA/SA – – Teachers intervene in only 1/6 of playground bullying and 1/5 of classroom bullying Research shows training significantly improves intervention ratios Original material copyright 2008 Dr. April Foreman all rights reserved. All other
  72. 72. Intervention: For Schools  Structure playground time, lunch time, and other times when boredom may be contributing to instances to bullying  Workbooks Original material copyright 2008 Dr. April Foreman all rights reserved. All other
  73. 73. Intervention: Tips for success  Don’t use words to describe the girls’ characters or personalities  Use words that concretely describe the behavior patterns  Active listening skills – – – Open-ended questions Accept/validate her POV Avoid problem-solving Original material copyright 2008 Dr. April Foreman all rights reserved. All other
  74. 74. Intervention: Tips for success – – – Offer options Ask a girl, “What do *you* think you should do?” Don’t tell her just to “ignore” it.  Does that really work? Original material copyright 2008 Dr. April Foreman all rights reserved. All other
  75. 75. Activity  Develop interventions for your case study Original material copyright 2008 Dr. April Foreman all rights reserved. All other
  76. 76. Wrapping up  Issues – – – I didn’t address Culture and SES influences on RA/SA Lots and lots of Developmental Theory, Systems Theory, and Feminist Theory What else did I miss?  Q&A  Email list for follow-up survey Original material copyright 2008 Dr. April Foreman all rights reserved. All other
  77. 77. Visit my web-site  www.techibuddy.blogspot.com  Contact me  Access power point slides  Consultation and training options for your staff  I enjoyed working with you! Let’s do it again some time… Original material copyright 2008 Dr. April Foreman all rights reserved. All other

×