Web 2.0 And Healthcare
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Web 2.0 And Healthcare

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Presented by Jerome Nadel at Documentation and Training Life Sciences, June 23-26, 2008....

Presented by Jerome Nadel at Documentation and Training Life Sciences, June 23-26, 2008.

A lot of attention has been devoted to the subject of Web 2.0. Companies are exploring how to incorporate Web 2.0 concepts into their externally-facing systems. Some take an IT-centric approach, focusing on the underlying technology and its implementation. Others examine the potential business benefits through improved communication and collaboration. However, both perspectives frequently struggle to demonstrate ROI in the face of uncertain user adoption and control/security issues. This presentation will examine Web 2.0 from a very specific angle: user experience in a business context, where "can do" meets "will do", and how that applies in life sciences, where customer needs are unique compared to traditional e-commerce or brochure-ware sites.

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Web 2.0 And Healthcare Web 2.0 And Healthcare Presentation Transcript

  • Web 2.0 and Healthcare Jerome Nadel Chief Experience Officer Human Factors International
  • Collaborate Tag Publish Rate Upload Rate Blog Discuss Wiki Apps Human Factors International © 2008 2
  • “A brand must accept that they will be relinquishing some control over their brand to their customers. They Web 2.0 also have to trust that, over time, an accurate collective opinion of the brand and its products will emerge from any community initiatives and that the brand can ultimately profit from learning from that collective opinion.” CEO eluma.com Enterprise 2.0 “Historically, knowledge management has focused on connecting people with content. But now the challenge is connecting people with people in increasingly virtual organizations.” CKO Ernst & Young Human Factors International © 2008 3
  • Connecting… people to people 1.0 people to content people to people 2.0 content to people 3.0 Human Factors International © 2008 4
  • “When it is all said and done, people would rather deal with a human being than a machine”. --pharma rep on wsj.com blog Human Factors International © 2008 5
  • Habits changing? Human Factors International © 2008 6
  • •25% felt overwhelmed by the amount of information. •22% felt frustrated by a lack of information or an inability to find what they were looking for. •18% felt confused by the information they found. Human Factors International © 2008 7
  • Convenience, Content and Credibility: What consumers are looking for on health information sites Arabella Crawford & Kath Straub, PhD Research Question 80% of American internet users have used the web to search for health related information (Pew Internet and American Life Project) Why do consumers use the web for health information? • Which sites do consumers prefer? Why? •What triggers trust? • Users go back because content was • Has consumer behavior evolved with useful and validate through other the web? •Convenience and speed – no waiting. •Health information sites build trust based sources • The web provides control and privacy over on reputation then content. Consumers the health research process favor sites that Previous Research •Information is comprehensive – more than • Start with information they already Takeaways Stanford, Tauber, Fogg&Marable (2002) users would expect any individual (doctor know or other source) to know. • Are well written but easy to read • The web is increasingly important as a •Consumers use the web as both a • Are presented by known sources health information resource. preliminary (pre-doctor) resource and a • Include content written by • Quick comprehensive information is second opinion source. experts the draw • Content matters • Consumers cross check content oSites that validate what consumers with other sites to confirm know inspire trust to explore further. information oContent is increasingly important in gaining trust and inspiring repeat visits. oHealth consumers read more than Method &Participants they interact Web- based survey posted on World • Consumer have become more Usability Day, 2007. Based on Silence, discriminating when looking for health et al (2004) information – they look more like the experts in previous studies. • 718 recipients of HFI’s monthly newsletter participated. Data from the 518 surveys were analyzed Bibliography Fogg, B. J., Kameda, T., Boyd, J., Marchall, J., Sethi, R., •70% start at a specific site. 16% start at Sockol, M. and Trowbridge, T. Stanford-Makovsky Web Credibility Study 2002: Investigating what makes Web search. The remainder vary by topic. Participant Demographics sites credible today, A Research Report by the Stanford •As of Nov07, WebMD was the #1 cited Persuasive Technology Lab &Makovsky& Company, GENDER AGE LOCATION health information resource. Stanford University. Retrieved from : •Mainly read content : general and topic http://www.webcredibility.org. •Users favored ”unbiased” sources sites with Female 65% 13 - 30 15% North America 80% “vetted” scientific information: Mayo Clinic, specific articles Fogg, B.J. Prominence-Interpretation Theory: Explaining Male 35% 31 - 43 38% Asia 9% PubMed, Medline and other government •Self-evaluation (distant second) How People Assess Credibility Online. Proc CHI 2003, •Content from other users is of more ACM Press. 44 - 61 44% Europe 7% and non – profit sites. 62 - 75 3% Africa 1% interest than interactive features Pew Research Center. Finding Answers in Sickness and In over 75 1% Health (2006). Available at: http://www.pewinternet.org Sillence, E., Briggs P., Fishwick L, Harris, P., Trust and Mistrust Human Factors International © 2008 of Online Health Sites CHI 2004, April 24–29, 2004, Vienna, Austria., ACM Press 8
  • Convenience, Content and Credibility: What consumers are looking for on health information sites Arabella Crawford & Kath Straub, PhD Research Question 80% of American internet users have used the web to search for health related information (Pew Internet and American Life Project) Why do consumers use the web for health information? • Which sites do consumers prefer? Why? •What triggers trust? • Users go back because content was • Has consumer behavior evolved with useful and validate through other the web? •Convenience and speed – no waiting. •Health information sites build trust based sources • The web provides control and privacy over on reputation then content. Consumers the health research process favor sites that Previous Research •Information is comprehensive – more than • Start with information they already Takeaways Stanford, Tauber, Fogg&Marable (2002) users would expect any individual (doctor know • Convenience and speed – no waiting or other source) to know. • Are well written but easy to read • The web is increasingly important as a •Consumers use the web as both a • Are presented by known sources health information resource. • The web provides control and privacy over preliminary (pre-doctor) resource and a • Include content written by • Quick comprehensive information is second opinion source. the draw the health research process experts • Content matters • Information is comprehensive – more than • Consumers cross check content oSites that validate what consumers with other sites to confirm know inspire trust to explore further. users would expect any individual (doctor information oContent is increasingly important in gaining trust and inspiring repeat or other source) to know. visists. Method &Participants • Consumers use the web as both a oHealth consumers read more than they interact Web- based survey posted on World preliminary (pre-doctor) resource and a Usability Day, 2007. Based on Silence, • Consumer have become more discriminating when looking for health et al (2004) second opinion source. information – they look more like the experts in previous studies. • 718 recipients of HFI’s monthly newsletter participated. Data from the 518 surveys were analyzed Bibliography Fogg, B. J., Kameda, T., Boyd, J., Marchall, J., Sethi, R., •70% start at a specific site. 16% start at Sockol, M. and Trowbridge, T. Stanford-Makovsky Web Credibility Study 2002: Investigating what makes Web search. The remainder vary by topic. Participant Demographics sites credible today, A Research Report by the Stanford •As of Nov07, WebMD was the #1 cited Persuasive Technology Lab &Makovsky& Company, GENDER AGE LOCATION health information resource. Stanford University. Retrieved from : •Mainly read content : general and topic http://www.webcredibility.org. •Users favored ”unbiased” sources sites with Female 65% 13 - 30 15% North America 80% “vetted” scientific information: Mayo Clinic, specific articles Fogg, B.J. Prominence-Interpretation Theory: Explaining Male 35% 31 - 43 38% Asia 9% PubMed, Medline and other government •Self-evaluation (distant second) How People Assess Credibility Online. Proc CHI 2003, •Content from other users is of more ACM Press. 44 - 61 44% Europe 7% and non – profit sites. 62 - 75 3% Africa 1% interest than interactive features Pew Research Center. Finding Answers in Sickness and In over 75 1% Health (2006). Available at: http://www.pewinternet.org Sillence, E., Briggs P., Fishwick L, Harris, P., Trust and Mistrust Human Factors International © 2008 of Online Health Sites CHI 2004, April 24–29, 2004, Vienna, Austria., ACM Press 9
  • Convenience, Content and Credibility: What consumers are looking for on health information sites Arabella Crawford & Kath Straub, PhD Research Question 80% of American internet users have used the web to search for health related information (Pew Internet and American Life Project) Why do consumers use the web for health information? • Which sites do consumers prefer? Why? •What triggers trust? • Users go back because content was • Has consumer behavior evolved with useful and validate through other the web? •Convenience and speed – no waiting. •Health information sites build trust based sources • The web provides control and privacy over on reputation then content. Consumers the health research process favor sites that Previous Research •Information is comprehensive – more than • Start with information they already Takeaways Stanford, Tauber, Fogg&Marable (2002) users would expect any individual (doctor know or other source) to know. • Are well written but easy to read • The web is increasingly important as a •Consumers use the web as both a • Are presented by known sources health information resource. preliminary (pre-doctor) resource and a • Include content written by • Quick comprehensive information is second opinion source. experts the draw • Content matters • Consumers cross check content oSites that validate what consumers with other sites to confirm know inspire trust to explore further. information oContent is increasingly important in gaining trust and inspiring repeat visists. oHealth consumers read more than Method &Participants they interact Web- based survey posted on World • Consumer have become more Usability Day, 2007. Based on Silence, discriminating when looking for health et al (2004) • 70% start at a specific site. 16% start at information – they look more like the experts in previous studies. • 718 recipients of HFI’s monthlysearch. The remainder vary by topic. newsletter participated. Data from the 518 surveys were analyzed • As of Nov07, WebMD was the #1 cited Bibliography Fogg, B. J., Kameda, T., Boyd, J., Marchall, J., Sethi, R., health•70% start at a specificresource. information site. 16% start at Sockol, M. and Trowbridge, T. Stanford-Makovsky Web Credibility Study 2002: Investigating what makes Web search. The remainder vary by topic. Participant Demographics • Users favored ”unbiased” sources sites sites credible today, A Research Report by the Stanford •As of Nov07, WebMD was the #1 cited Persuasive Technology Lab &Makovsky& Company, GENDER AGE with “vetted” scientific information: read content : general and topic health information resource. LOCATION •Mainly Stanford University. Retrieved from : http://www.webcredibility.org. •Users favored ”unbiased” sources sites with Female 65% 13 - 30 15% Mayo “vetted” scientific information: Mayo Clinic, and articles Clinic, PubMed, Medline specific North America 80% Fogg, B.J. Prominence-Interpretation Theory: Explaining •Self-evaluation (distant second) other government andgovernment PubMed, Medline and other How People Assess Credibility Online. Proc CHI 2003, non–profit•Content from other users is of more sites Male 35% 31 - 43 38% Asia 9% ACM Press. 44 - 61 44% and non – profit sites. Europe 7% 62 - 75 3% Africa 1% interest than interactive features Pew Research Center. Finding Answers in Sickness and In over 75 1% Health (2006). Available at: http://www.pewinternet.org Sillence, E., Briggs P., Fishwick L, Harris, P., Trust and Mistrust Human Factors International © 2008 of Online Health Sites CHI 2004, April 24–29, 2004, Vienna, Austria., ACM Press 10
  • Convenience, Content and Credibility: What consumers are looking for on health information sites Arabella Crawford & Kath Straub, PhD Research Question 80% of American internet users have used the web to search for health related information (Pew Internet and American Life Project) Why do consumers use the web for health information? • Which sites do consumers prefer? Why? •What triggers trust? • Users go back because content was • Has consumer behavior evolved with useful and validate through other the web? •Convenience and speed – no waiting. •Health information sites build trust based sources • The web provides control and privacy over on reputation then content. Consumers the health research process favor sites that Previous Research •Information is comprehensive – more than • Start with information they already Takeaways Stanford, Tauber, Fogg&Marable (2002) • Health information sites build trust based on users would expect any individual (doctor know or other source) to know. • The web is increasingly important as a • Are well written but easy to read reputation then content. Consumers favor information resource. •Consumers use the web as both a health • Are presented by known sources preliminary (pre-doctor) resource and a • Quick comprehensive information is • Include content written by second opinion source. sites that experts the draw • Start with information they content • Consumers cross check already know validate what consumers • Content matters Sites that o • Are well writtenother sites to confirm read with but easy to know inspire trust to explore further. information Content is increasingly important in o • Are presented by known sources gaining trust and inspiring repeat • Include content written by experts visits. consumers read more than Health o Method &Participants they interact Web- based survey posted on World • Consumer have become more Usability Day, 2007. Based on Silence, et al (2004) • Consumers cross check content with discriminating when looking for health information – they look more like the other sites to confirm information experts in previous studies. • 718 recipients of HFI’s monthly newsletter participated. Data from the 518 surveys were analyzed Bibliography Fogg, B. J., Kameda, T., Boyd, J., Marchall, J., Sethi, R., •70% start at a specific site. 16% start at Sockol, M. and Trowbridge, T. Stanford-Makovsky Web Credibility Study 2002: Investigating what makes Web search. The remainder vary by topic. Participant Demographics sites credible today, A Research Report by the Stanford •As of Nov07, WebMD was the #1 cited Persuasive Technology Lab &Makovsky& Company, GENDER AGE LOCATION health information resource. Stanford University. Retrieved from : •Mainly read content : general and topic http://www.webcredibility.org. •Users favored ”unbiased” sources sites with Female 65% 13 - 30 15% North America 80% “vetted” scientific information: Mayo Clinic, specific articles Fogg, B.J. Prominence-Interpretation Theory: Explaining Male 35% 31 - 43 38% Asia 9% PubMed, Medline and other government •Self-evaluation (distant second) How People Assess Credibility Online. Proc CHI 2003, •Content from other users is of more ACM Press. 44 - 61 44% Europe 7% and non – profit sites. 62 - 75 3% Africa 1% interest than interactive features Pew Research Center. Finding Answers in Sickness and In over 75 1% Health (2006). Available at: http://www.pewinternet.org Sillence, E., Briggs P., Fishwick L, Harris, P., Trust and Mistrust Human Factors International © 2008 of Online Health Sites CHI 2004, April 24–29, 2004, Vienna, Austria., ACM Press 11
  • Convenience, Content and Credibility: What consumers are looking for on health information sites Arabella Crawford & Kath Straub, PhD Research Question 80% of American internet users have used the web to search for health related information (Pew Internet and American Life Project) Why do consumers use the web for health information? • Which sites do consumers prefer? Takeaways Why? •What triggers trust? • Users go back because content was • Has consumer behavior evolved with the web? •Convenience and speed – no waiting. • The web is increasingly important as a useful and validate through other •Health information sites build trust based sources • The web provides control and privacy over on reputation then content. Consumers the health research process health information resource. favor sites that Previous Research •Information is comprehensive – more than • Start with information they already Takeaways Stanford, Tauber, Fogg&Marable (2002) users would expect any individual (doctor • Quick comprehensive information is the draw know or other source) to know. • Are well written but easy to read • The web is increasingly important as a •Consumers use the web as both a • Content matters health information resource. • Are presented by known sources preliminary (pre-doctor) resesource and a • Quick comprehensive information is • Include content written by second opinion source. o Sites that validate what consumers experts the draw • Content matters know inspire trust to explore further Sites that validate what consumers • Consumers cross check content o know inspire trust to explore further. with other sites to confirm o Content is increasingly important in in information Content is increasingly important o gaining trust and inspiring repeat inspiring repeat gaining trust and visits. visits Method &Participants o Health consumers read more than they Health consumers read more than they interact o Web- based survey posted on World Usability Day, 2007. Based on Silence, interact • Consumer have become more discriminating when looking for health et al (2004) • Consumers have become inmorestudies. like the information – they look more experts previous • 718 recipients of HFI’s monthly newsletter participated. Data from the discriminating when looking for health 518 surveys were analyzed information – they look Bibliography T.,theJ.,experts in more like Fogg, B. J., Kameda, Boyd, Marchall, J., Sethi, R., •70% start at a specific site. 16% start at Sockol, M. and Trowbridge, T. Stanford-Makovsky Web search. The remainder vary by topic. previous studies Credibility Study 2002: Investigating what makes Web Participant Demographics sites credible today, A Research Report by the Stanford •As of Nov07, WebMD was the #1 cited Persuasive Technology Lab &Makovsky& Company, GENDER AGE LOCATION health information resource. Stanford University. Retrieved from : •Mainly read content : general and topic http://www.webcredibility.org. •Users favored ”unbiased” sources sites with Female 65% 13 - 30 15% North America 80% “vetted” scientific information: Mayo Clinic, specific articles Fogg, B.J. Prominence-Interpretation Theory: Explaining Male 35% 31 - 43 38% Asia 9% PubMed, Medline and other government •Self-evaluation (distant second) How People Assess Credibility Online. Proc CHI 2003, •Content from other users is of more ACM Press. 44 - 61 44% Europe 7% and non – profit sites. 62 - 75 3% Africa 1% interest than interactive features Pew Research Center. Finding Answers in Sickness and In over 75 1% Health (2006). Available at: http://www.pewinternet.org Sillence, E., Briggs P., Fishwick L, Harris, P., Trust and Mistrust Human Factors International © 2008 of Online Health Sites CHI 2004, April 24–29, 2004, Vienna, Austria., ACM Press 12
  • Top 5 Trust Markers for Web Sites 1. Site is easy to use 2. Advice comes from a knowledgeable source 3. Advice prepared by an expert 4. Advice appears to be impartial and independent 5. Reasoning behind advice is explained Going Online for Health Advice: Changes in Usage and Trust Practices Over the Last 5 Years by Sillence, Briggs, Harris, and Fishwick. Interacting with Computers 19, 2007 pg. 397-406. Human Factors International © 2008 13
  • Knowledge comes in many forms… Factual / Formalized Organic / Experiential Chat Experience Reports Studies Notes Symptoms Facts Research Comments Business Rules Taxonomies Communities Blogs Wikis “Where do I look?” “”Who do I ask?” Human Factors International © 2008 14
  • Where should I go? Factual / Formalized Organic / Experiential “Where do I look?” “”Who do I ask?” Human Factors International © 2008 15
  • Destination related to question?… Factual / Formalized Reports Studies Facts Research Where do I go? Business Rules Taxonomies Community/Emotional/ Experiential Experience Chat Notes Symptoms Comments Communities Blogs Wikis Human Factors International © 2008 16
  • Knowledge comes in many forms… Community/Emotional/ Factual / Formalized Experiential • “How many ibuprofen for my 6yr • “How are others coping with Cancer?” old son?” • “I want to know what its like for others to • “What are the symptoms of a have a son with Autism” poison ivy rash?” “Where do I look?” “”Who do I ask?” Lorem Ipsum Dolar Tags Amit Ipsum Lorem Lorem Ipsum Ipsum Amit Community/Emotional/ Amit Experiential Content Factual Content Videos Lorem ipsum dolar amit Lorem ipsum dolar amit Lorem ipsum dolar amit Lorem ipsum Lorem ipsum dolar amit dolar amit Human Factors International © 2008 17
  • Knowledge comes in many forms… Community/Emotional/ Factual / Formalized Experiential • “How many ibuprofen for my 6yr • “How are others coping with Cancer?” old son?” • “I want to know what its like for others to • “What are the symptoms of a have a son with Autism” poison ivy rash?” “Where do I look?” “”Who do I ask?” Tags Lorem Ipsum Dolar Tags Amit Ipsum Amit Ipsum Lorem Lorem Lorem Lorem Ipsum Ipsum Ipsum Ipsum Amit Amit Community/Emotional/ Amit Videos Experiential Content Factual Content Factual Content Lorem ipsum Videos dolar amit Lorem ipsum dolar amit Lorem ipsum dolar amit Lorem ipsum dolar amit Lorem ipsum dolar amit Discussion Lorem ipsum Lorem ipsum dolar amit dolar amit Lorem ipsum Human Factors International © 2008 18
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  • Will? Can? Human Factors International © 2008 21
  • Understanding of Decision Making Performance Persuasion (CAN DO) (WILL DO) Conversion* Positive Customer Experience * Conversion = adoption, usage, purchase, participation, contribution, etc. Human Factors International © 2008 22
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  • Human Factors International © 2008 24
  • Formalizing Persuasion, Emotion, Trust… Strategy Heat Maps & Scan Paths Score Card Personas Persuasion Flow Diagram Emotion Map Human Factors International © 2008 25
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  • Gaze Opacity Visualization Human Factors International © 2008 28
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  • 1 Second 2 Seconds 3 Seconds Human Factors International © 2008 30
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  • Attract Engage Empower Human Factors International © 2008 33
  • Attract Engage Empower Human Factors International © 2008 34
  • Attract Engage Empower Human Factors International © 2008 35
  • Attract Engage Empower Human Factors International © 2008 36
  • Attract Engage Empower Human Factors International © 2008 37
  • Attract Engage Empower Human Factors International © 2008 38
  • Connectedness, contribution, and collaboration 1. Influence and persuade 2. Combine structured and organic knowledge 3. Enable contribution 4. Know me and serve me… “Where do I look?” “”Who do I ask?” Tags Lorem Ipsum Dolar Tags Amit Ipsum Amit Ipsum Lorem Lorem Lorem Lorem Ipsum Ipsum Ipsum Ipsum Amit Amit Community/Emotional/ Amit Videos Experiential Content Factual Content Factual Content Lorem ipsum Videos dolar amit Lorem ipsum dolar amit Lorem ipsum dolar amit Lorem ipsum dolar amit Lorem ipsum dolar amit Discussion Lorem ipsum Lorem ipsum dolar amit dolar amit Lorem ipsum Human Factors International © 2008 39
  • Web 3.0? Everything, everywhere Just in time When I need it How I need it Push to me But filtered through people (not a web) trust is that much more important content to people Human Factors International © 2008 40
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