• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content
Improving Findability: The Role of Information Architecture in Effective Search
 

Improving Findability: The Role of Information Architecture in Effective Search

on

  • 6,124 views

Presented at Documentation and Training East 2007 by Seth Earley -- Search is not just a plug in or a utility. While "just Googling" for information works on the web, there are numerous reasons why ...

Presented at Documentation and Training East 2007 by Seth Earley -- Search is not just a plug in or a utility. While "just Googling" for information works on the web, there are numerous reasons why this is not always the best approach for intranets and individual web sites.

This slide deck explores the role of information architecture and discusses 5 important strategies for improving search including tuned search, metadata and tagging, faceted search, term expansion and disambiguation, and results clustering.

Statistics

Views

Total Views
6,124
Views on SlideShare
5,944
Embed Views
180

Actions

Likes
3
Downloads
215
Comments
0

4 Embeds 180

http://www.scoop.it 163
http://www.slideshare.net 11
http://www.doctrain.com 5
http://librarianfinds.wordpress.com 1

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

CC Attribution-ShareAlike LicenseCC Attribution-ShareAlike License

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    Improving Findability: The Role of Information Architecture in Effective Search Improving Findability: The Role of Information Architecture in Effective Search Presentation Transcript

    • Improving Findability: The Role of Information Architecture in Effective Search DocTrain East – October 18th, 2007 Seth Earley 781-444-0287 Seth@earley.com 1 Improve your ability to find critical information
    • Seth Earley, Founder, Earley & Associates, Inc. 16 person consulting firm working with enterprises to develop knowledge and content management systems and taxonomy, metadata and search strategies Co-author of Practical Knowledge Management from IBM Press 14 years experience building taxonomies for content and knowledge management systems, 20+ years experience in technology Founder of the Boston Knowledge Management Forum Former adjunct professor at Northeastern University Founder of Search Community of Practice : http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/SearchCoP Founder of Taxonomy Community of Practice: http://finance.groups.yahoo.com/group/TaxoCoP Host monthly conference calls of case studies on search and taxonomy Recently acquired taxonomy management tool company (www.wordmap.com) Precise access to information, enabled by consistent organisation © 2007 2 Improve your ability to find critical information
    • Agenda Search and the hype cycle, search as a utility Basic premises The challenge of search Taxonomy, metadata & content management 5 taxonomy & search strategies you should know! Faceted search Tagging Clustering Tuned search Disambiguation © 2007 3 Improve your ability to find critical information
    • Search as Utility “search as a utility has become deeply ingrained into people's everyday lives.“ – Study by Nielsen/Net Ratings “search software, hardware, and support bundle or search appliance has become very popular since being introduced in early 2002quot; – Goebel Group These are misleading concepts. Search is used as a utility, but contexts vary so widely that “plugging search in” does not always produce satisfactory results. © 2007 4 Improve your ability to find critical information
    • Search and the Hype Cycle Different ‘flavors’ of Search are at various levels of maturity 2. At the Peak 2 Enterprise IM 4 Information Retrieval and Search — Advanced 5 Smart Enterprise Suites Wikis Content Integration 1 Taxonomy 3 Corporate Blogging 1. On the Rise Corporate Semantic Web Desktop Portals Content-Process Fusion Desktop Search 5. Entering the Personal Knowledge Networks Plateau Information Extraction 4. Climbing the Slope Virtual Workplace 3. Sliding Into the Trough Knowledge Web Conferencing Management Public Semantic Web MMS Automated Text Enterprise Content Categorization Management Expertise Location and Presence Management Folksonomies E-Learning Suites Source: http://www.gartner.com Shared Workspaces Records Management © 2007 5 Improve your ability to find critical information
    • Basic Premises Premise 1 – All of search is about metadata Need to understand the relationship of taxonomy and metadata Premise 2 – The line between search and navigation is blurring Faceted search looks like navigation, guided navigation is search Premise 3 – Search needs to be designed as an application, not an appliance Design of any application requires attention to user context Premise 4 – Search needs to be integrated into processes, not added on Relevant search is context specific, context depends on process © 2007 6 Improve your ability to find critical information
    • Basic Premises Premise 5 – We need to understand work processes, user tasks and user context in order to make search effective Users search for information in order to accomplish a goal Premise 6 – Taxonomy, metadata and information architecture are all aspects of search These are all an attempt to surface information for users in the context of their objectives Premise 7 – Search algorithms, no matter how sophisticated, intelligent and complex will never obviate the need for some level of structured tagging Premise 8 – Taxonomy strategy needs to be tightly linked to search strategy (and to content strategy) © 2007 7 Improve your ability to find critical information
    • Basic Premises Premise 9 – Metadata is either implicit in content or explicitly applied to content Implicit metadata can take many forms – inherent structure of a piece of content or even the source or context of content Premise 10 – Search is messy Relevant results are in the eye of the beholder, language is imprecise, meaning is vague © 2007 8 Improve your ability to find critical information
    • “…search terms are short, ambiguous and an approximation of the searchers real information need…” Source: http://research.microsoft.com/~ryenw/papers/WhiteCONTEXT2002.pdf Ryen W. White, Joemon M. Jose and Ian Ruthven © 2007 9 Improve your ability to find critical information
    • What is the right balance? Content can be created in structured or unstructured contexts It’s value can vary depending on audience, context or process Some content is extremely nuanced and requires more precise access (according to audience or task, solution, etc…) Search can be based on inherent structure and content of a document (implicit metadata) or on information applied to that content (explicit metadata) © 2007 10 Improve your ability to find critical information
    • Different tools are appropriate depending upon degree of collaboration and creation versus structured access More Less Structured Structured Knowledge Creation Knowledge Access/Reuse Chaotic Processes Controlled Processes Online Records Mgt Wikki’s Email Workflow Collaborative Learning Systems systems Workspaces Instant Blogs Messages Instructor Doc Mgt Content Mgt Discussions Led Systems Courses © 2007 11 Improve your ability to find critical information
    • Relative value Lower Value Higher Value (Easier to access) (More difficult to access) Unfiltered Reviewed/Vetted/Approved Lower Cost Higher Cost Formal Tagging/Organizing Processes Best External News Interim Example Benchmarks Practices deliverables deliverables Message Discussion Success Approved Content text postings Stories Methods Repositories Structured tagging Social tagging (taxonomy) (“folksonomy”) © 2007 12 Improve your ability to find critical information
    • IA: The intersection of taxonomies, metadata and content objects Taxonomy: system for organizing and classifying content Metadata: information about our content, housekeeping, as well as semantic and structural information Content Objects: groups of metadata that are assembled into components that are then assembled into pages or documents © 2007 13 Improve your ability to find critical information
    • Goals of a taxonomy Allow for knowledge discovery Improve usability of applications as well as learnability of applications Reduce the cost of delivering services, developing products and conducting operations Improve operational efficiencies by allowing for reuse of information rather than recreation Improve search results and applicability (both precision and recall) © 2007 14 Improve your ability to find critical information
    • Precision versus recall Precision versus recall We have a repository, execute a search and retrieve a result set Results Relevant items in a database But – not every relevant document is retrieved and not all results are relevant This is quantified as “recall” and “precision” © 2007 15 Improve your ability to find critical information
    • The role of metadata It is the “is –ness” of a piece of content And the “about- ness” of a piece of content This is a Product Description It is about the Motorola Razr Information Architecture is the organizing Information Architecture is the organizing principle behind metadata and how that principle behind metadata and how that information is surfaced to the user information is surfaced to the user © 2007 16 Improve your ability to find critical information
    • Content models Content is structured with body information and a wrapper that formats and tags that information Also called a “content object model”* Title Simple content object model Description *Content model refers to overall framework Content object model refers to a specific model for a set of document types I.e., an overall “Content Model” includes multiple Content Object Models” © 2007 17 Improve your ability to find critical information
    • FAQ Product “is – ness” Press release Specification Promotion Title Doc_ID Doc_Type Author Date Product_Name “about – ness” Features Metadata for a product page in a Category content management system © 2007 18 Improve your ability to find critical information
    • Content modeling – Policy example Standard Header Title Subject Doc_ID Author Date Policy content type Content_ID Date Content_ID Date Customer Service content type Content_ID Date Claims processing content type © 2007 19 Improve your ability to find critical information
    • © 2007 20 Improve your ability to find critical information
    • © 2007 21 Improve your ability to find critical information
    • Why the metadata tutorial? One word: faceted search Improve your ability to find critical information
    • Faceted Search/Guided Navigation Improve your ability to find critical information
    • Navigational taxonomy Challenge is there is no “one way” to navigate that is correct. Taxonomy can be a hierarchical grouping of navigational nodes Is this the “correct” way? on a web site © 2007 24 Improve your ability to find critical information
    • Navigational taxonomy Motorola.com Modems & Mobile phones 2-way radios gateways Camera Bluetooth phones phones Bluetooth accessories Sunglasses Headsets Or is this one “correct”? Or is this one? © 2007 25 Improve your ability to find critical information
    • Motorola.com => United States => Government => Portable Radios Motorola.com => Portable Radios => United States => Government Motorola.com Government Enterprise Consumers Mobile Portable computers radios United Canada United States Kingdom Motorola.com => Government => Portable Radios => United States © 2007 26 Improve your ability to find critical information
    • Navigating with “facets” Two way radios “Facet” is a top level Portable category in the taxonomy Fixed Mobile Motorcycle Product type Vertical market Target document: Government P = Portable radio Manufacturing G = United States V = Government Wholesale retail Country Vertical market Canada United Kingdom United States Just three nodes with 5 Geographic terms each could have 3 to region the 5th power (243) possible combinations © 2007 27 Improve your ability to find critical information
    • Is it search? Or navigation? Some people can identify with a very practical use of taxonomies: Online Shopping Many of the parameters on diamond Many of the parameters on diamond Taxonomies allow selection of Taxonomies allow selection of selection (color, cut, clarity and shape) selection (color, cut, clarity and shape) type of processor, amount of type of processor, amount of pull from a “controlled vocabulary” that pull from a “controlled vocabulary” that ram, manufacturers, etc ram, manufacturers, etc are part of the taxonomy are part of the taxonomy © 2007 28 Improve your ability to find critical information
    • Taxo term values Facets © 2007 29 Improve your ability to find critical information
    • © 2007 30 Improve your ability to find critical information
    • Faceted search implies tagged content with nice structured metadata… What if we don’t have a lot of existing metadata? Does that mean hire bunch of people to enter it in? Manual tagging is rarely practical with large amounts of lower value content. Instead, we need to derive implicit metadata from content Improve your ability to find critical information
    • Leveraging metadata All search leverages metadata Metadata is either implied/derived from content or specifically applied to content Apply taxonomy terms as metadata to a document so that relevant and consistent search results are returned when users enter query terms ie. Taxonomy drives content tagging. Search engine leverages tags for more precise results © 2007 32 Improve your ability to find critical information
    • All search leverages metadata… …but not all metadata is explicit Full text search derives metadata about documents Creates an index of terms that occur in a document collection Associates documents with those index entries © 2007 33 Improve your ability to find critical information
    • All search leverages metadata… Occurrence of certain words in a document and the relative value of those occurrences, including: Weighting Relative positioning Semantic relationships… …becomes information about the document that is cached in the index and served by the search engine Search algorithms vary in how metadata is derived and exposed to users. Relevance ranking, for example, is additional metadata for a result that is Relevance ranking, for example, is additional metadata for a result that is ‘implied’ or derived based on incoming connections to a piece of content. ‘implied’ or derived based on incoming connections to a piece of content. © 2007 34 Improve your ability to find critical information
    • Context as metadata Metadata can be explicit or implicit Implicit: implied though not directly expressed; inherent in the nature of something, implied by context Explicit: precisely and clearly expressed or readily observable; leaving nothing to implication © 2007 35 Improve your ability to find critical information
    • Examples of implicit metadata: ‘Structure’ and format of content – a piece of content may be ‘unstructured’ and not contain metadata, but it is well organized. Example : Newspaper story contains a headline, sub head, and first paragraph with who, what, where, when, etc. Clear editorial standards Context of content – Where did the content come from? If from a particular web site, file share, data source or intranet location the domain of knowledge provides context. How can we disambiguate the term “diamond”? Sports site – baseball diamond Commerce site – diamond ring Sales context for ‘feature’ versus engineering context for ‘feature’ “Adapter” – power cord “Adapter” – blue tooth headset © 2007 36 Improve your ability to find critical information
    • Context as metadata If we maintain context of a piece of information in our search results, this is equivalent to having additional metadata on that content Search results organized by repository This is a form of “federated” search – a single search term fed to multiple repositories Example courtesy of Morrison and Foerster © 2007 37 Improve your ability to find critical information
    • Structure as metadata Some content has excellent implicit metadata News story for example Has a main topic Usually a summary of important points at the beginning Mentions people, places and things that can be ‘extracted’ as entities Complies with editorial standards, usually contains a narrow theme Will get good results from auto categorization and entity extraction Some content has poor implicit metadata Email for example Usually contains lots of topics Does not have a theme Does not comply with editorial standards, can be rambling, poorly written Will not get good results from auto categorization and entity extraction © 2007 38 Improve your ability to find critical information
    • Who tags content? Automated Based on process Rules derived depending on source or use of content (for example: Policyholder Communications) Based on content Learning algorithm or rules based classifier Full text search index Extracted entities By People By primary client Customer tags documents based on content and purpose Outsourced to service bureau Service bureau tags content based on rules and style guides © 2007 39 Improve your ability to find critical information
    • Indexing Full text index is a form of metadata Search vendors differ in how algorithms derive and surface this metadata Having a structured taxonomy adds customer context to the search index Context Challenges Derivation Application Surfacing to UI When we use a taxonomy to access content we have turned it into an index Taxonomy is not content specific, has no relevance or significance Taxonomy can be reused, an index cannot © 2007 40 Improve your ability to find critical information
    • How are tags derived?/Where do they live? = License Agreement License Content Type = Forward Index – Words per document Organization = Inverted Index – Documents per word ABC Company ABC DEF Company customers section 7 customer support secondary support Topic = Support customer support team secondary support person DEF SLA ABC shall provide first level technical DEF software SLA failure support to all Licensed Product end users end users software and/or Sublicensed Product escrow agreement. source code customers/users. DEF will provide second escrow agent support level level support. DEF shall provide to ABC a exhibit c sublicensed product primary and a secondary support person to act as the primary interface with ABC’s first level technical support technical support technical and customer support team. DEF licensed product shall provide direct technical support to release condition ABC for all uses of the DEF Software. Support level definitions and responsibilities are set forth in Exhibit C. An “SLA Failure” What would extracted entities look like? as defined in Exhibit C shall qualify as a How do we know the difference between “licensed Release Condition sufficient to authorize the product end users”, “licensed product” and “end Escrow Agent to release to Source Code to ABC pursuant to Section 7 and the Escrow users”? Agreement. © 2007 41 Improve your ability to find critical information
    • Search index points to document 1 Forward Index – Words per document Inverted Index – Documents per word ABC – 1,2,3,4 Customers - 3 2 customer support – 3,4 customer support team - 1 DEF - 2 DEF software – 2 … etc 3 4 © 2007 42 Improve your ability to find critical information
    • Clustering algorithm groups similar documents (Dynamic) Clusters are based on what is important to my audience and what the user is interested in at that moment (search context) These are about software licensing Search for “SLA” returned a total of 8 documents licensed product – 5 items software source code support level sublicensed product technical support – 3 items These are about customer support © 2007 43 Improve your ability to find critical information
    • How can content be tagged? Instead of tagging the document, an index is 001 created that points to the document GUID = License Content Type = Organization = ABC Company DEF Company ABC shall provide first level technical Topic = Support support to all Licensed Product end users and/or Sublicensed Product customers/users. DEF will provide second level support. DEF shall provide to ABC a GUID Content type Organization Topic primary and a secondary support person to 001 License ABC, DEF Support act as the primary interface with ABC’s technical and customer support team. DEF 002 SLA ABC Terms shall provide direct technical support to ABC for all uses of the DEF Software. Support level definitions and responsibilities are set forth in Exhibit C. An “SLA Failure” How do we leverage an index in search as defined in Exhibit C shall qualify as a Release Condition sufficient to authorize the and navigation? Escrow Agent to release to Source Code to ABC pursuant to Section 7 and the Escrow Agreement. © 2007 44 Improve your ability to find critical information
    • Navigation versus Classification Sales Tools Analyst Reports Case Studies Customer References FAQ’s Pricing & Licensing White Papers Presentations © 2007 45 Improve your ability to find critical information
    • Navigation versus Classification Sales Tools Best Practices in .NET Development Analyst Reports By Title By Topic By Product Case Studies By Customer Building Rich Internet Applications By Product By Solution By Industry By Region Customer References Data Translations Using XML and XSLT FAQ’s Pricing & Licensing White Papers Presentations © 2007 46 Improve your ability to find critical information
    • Navigation versus Classification .NET Sales Tools Analyst Reports By Title By Topic By Product Case Studies .Architecture By Customer By Product By Solution By Industry By Region Distributed Applications Customer References FAQ’s Pricing & Licensing White Papers Presentations © 2007 47 Improve your ability to find critical information
    • Navigation versus Classification GUID Content type Customer Topic Sales Tools 001 Analyst ABC, DEF Architecture Analyst Reports Reports By Title 002 Case Studies ABC .NET By Topic By Product This is what a search index would look like that contains metadata Case Studies By Customer We need to marry the navigational index with the search index By Product By Solution By Industry By Region Navigation is just another access structure – an entry in the index – but is different from classification GUID Content type Customer Topic Node 001 Analyst ABC, DEF Architecture Sales ToolsAnalyst Reports Reports 002 Case Studies ABC .NET Sales ToolsCase Studies © 2007 48 Improve your ability to find critical information
    • Navigation leverages Classification Topic • .NET • Architecture Sales Tools • Collaboration Analyst Reports • Compliance • Distributed Applications By Title • Industry Standards • JAVA By Topic • Messaging By Product • … Product • Web Speed Workshop Case Studies • 4GL Development System • Translation Manager By Customer Solution • Roundtable • Business Continuity By Product • … • Business Intelligence By Solution • Business Trends • Deployment By Industry • Development Industry By Region • Integration • Government • … • Financial Services • Healthcare Customer References • Manufacturing • Real Estate Region FAQ’s • Retail • North America Pricing & Licensing • Telecommunications • EMEA • Transportation and Distribution • Latin America White Papers • … • Asia Pac Presentations • Worldwide … © 2007 49 Improve your ability to find critical information
    • Tuned Search, or “Best Bets” © 2007 50 Improve your ability to find critical information
    • Tuned Search What is Tuned Search? Search terms are defined in a taxonomy and mapped back to specific locations of information (ie. Specific web pages). Eg. A user searching on a broad term like cell phones would be first pointed to a landing page (a “best bet”), or presented a box of hand-picked links above regular search results. © 2007 51 Improve your ability to find critical information
    • Best Bets Example – Best Buy © 2007 52 Improve your ability to find critical information
    • Tuned Search “Best Bets” The same search using just keyword matching could a have retrieved a list of pages with the words “phone” or “cell” e.g. Home phones Cordless phones 12 cell batteries Etc. Reading through pages of possible matches is time consuming and frustrating © 2007 53 Improve your ability to find critical information
    • Best Bets Example – SAP.com Search on “CRM” or “Customer Relationship Management” © 2007 54 Improve your ability to find critical information
    • Tuned Search “Best Bets” How Does a Taxonomy Help? Using the taxonomy categories as landing pages assures that users are strategically directed to the content that is most important. © 2007 55 Improve your ability to find critical information
    • Tuned search – “Best Bets” When do I use it? As a portal or websites grow, the number of pages with matching keywords increases. This increases the likelihood of a search query returning high numbers of results. Tuned search helps when keyword searching brings back to many results, and you want to map common searches to specific, commonly viewed pages of information. © 2007 56 Improve your ability to find critical information
    • Tuned Search – “Best Bets” How is it implemented? Create a small database of search terms and then map these terms to landing pages or specific links Common search terms may be extracted from search logs Search engine must be configured to display the best bets link box or redirect to the landing page Few search engines provide this capability out of the box… © 2007 57 Improve your ability to find critical information
    • Disambiguation © 2007 58 Improve your ability to find critical information
    • Disambiguation of search results What is Disambiguation? If a user enters a broad term (like “mobile”) the taxonomy can return terms that help the user select a more precise terms Includes multiple approaches: Term expansion Complex lookups © 2007 59 Improve your ability to find critical information
    • Disambiguation methods Show related search terms in the search results page. Show additional search terms as links, perhaps with a prompt - quot;You might also be interested in:quot; Expand the query and show the expanded words in the search box Expand the query invisibly © 2007 60 Improve your ability to find critical information
    • Disambiguation of search results Mobile data terminals mobile Handheld computers Network Infrastructure Presenting Mobile switches term in Phones multiple Fixed mobile car phones contexts Mobile phones Software applications Mobile applications Two way radios Mobile radios Intelligent video solutions Mobile video enforcer Mobile video sharing MESH Solutions Multi-radio mobile broadband Mobile Computing Mobile application © 2007 61 Improve your ability to find critical information
    • From Associative Relationships 62 Improve your ability to find critical information
    • “We should get Google”… © 2007 63 Improve your ability to find critical information
    • Why you will not “just get Google” Google leverages linkages on the web that are not typically duplicated internally in the organization Search engines cannot infer intent or know what is important to you in the context of your work task Information relevance is dependant on who you are and your level of expertise as well as what you are trying to accomplish Not all content is equal - Google is fine for broad search results or less precise information, may not work as well if large numbers of documents with finer granularity of differences © 2007 64 Improve your ability to find critical information
    • Google’s search appliance is leveraging taxonomy values The new “one box” feature allows querying of structured content via specific keywords East Coast Sales Contact: Wick PO Revenue by age Weather © 2007 65 Improve your ability to find critical information
    • © 2007 66 Improve your ability to find critical information
    • © 2007 67 Improve your ability to find critical information
    • Configuration process See: http://code.google.com/enterprise/documentation/oneboxguide.html “Define trigger” “Choose provider” “Format results” What does this really mean? Need to consider taxonomy, metadata and thesaurus entries, for example a trigger may include equivalent terms: lax airport conditions SFO airport delays newark airport status © 2007 68 Improve your ability to find critical information
    • We still have a context problem “Revenue” is an ambiguous term © 2007 69 Improve your ability to find critical information
    • Why doesn’t Google, just use Google? © 2007 70 Improve your ability to find critical information
    • Why you will not “just get Google” © 2007 71 Improve your ability to find critical information
    • Developing a Search Strategy Search needs to be thought of as an application – not an afterthought It’s not possible to ‘bolt it on’ and expect decent results Organizations are beginning to recognize search as an integral application When developing a search strategy, one size does not fit all Enterprise search is different from Web search © 2007 72 Improve your ability to find critical information
    • Developing a Search Strategy Find combined set of functionality that will satisfy needs of different groups within the organization. This involves identifying common requirements that are good candidates for standardized solutions. Identify unique requirements of groups that could place a burden on the standard search service and where it may be better to develop a custom extension. The most effective strategy is one that avoids redundancy and unnecessary complexity that often happens when systems are developed and / or integrated in an “ad-hoc” manner. Identifying the “outliers” up front may be as important as identifying common issues. Having a global set of requirements enables prioritization based on both value and cost. © 2007 73 Improve your ability to find critical information
    • Community of Practice Calls Taxonomy Group url: http://finance.groups.yahoo.com/group/TaxoCoP Upcoming call topics: Taxonomies & the Semantic Web Taxonomy Validation Proving the ROI Multi-lingual Taxonomies Getting Management Buy-In Taxonomy Tools & Software: Beyond Excel Taxonomy Project Deliverables: What to Promise and When Taxonomy CoP Wiki at http://taxocop.wikispaces.com/ Search Group url: http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/SearchCoP © 2007 74 Improve your ability to find critical information
    • Research Reports and White Papers Go to http://www.earley.com/Articles.asp Aligning Business Technology Goals Deriving a Taxonomy: Assembling Terms for a Consistent Point-of- View Indexing & Taxonomies: Finding the Best Way to Organize Online Content Knowledge Mapping - A Fast Way to the Heart of the Organization Making the Business Case for Enterprise Taxonomy Managing Multiple Facets & Polyhierarchy Measuring the Success of a Taxonomy Project: Tuning Content Categories for Continuous Improvement Retrospective Indexing: Strategies for Cataloging Legacy Content Taxonomy Metadata & Search Text Mining: Search's Silver Lining © 2007 75 Improve your ability to find critical information
    • Questions? Seth Earley seth@earley.com www.earley.com 781-444-0287 Send an email to Info@earley.com for a free pass to one of our con calls. © 2007 76 Improve your ability to find critical information