How to Maximize Content for a Global Audience: Best Practices for Translating, Localizing and Globalizing Content in Life Sciences

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Presented by Ann Zdunczyk at Documentation and Training Life Sciences, June 23-26, 2008 in Indianapolis. …

Presented by Ann Zdunczyk at Documentation and Training Life Sciences, June 23-26, 2008 in Indianapolis.

Creating content for a global audience can seem daunting at first, but most best practices come down to practical guidelines and simple common sense. Document assets must be packaged in a consistent and specific way. Graphic assets must be tracked more specifically than with an English-only project. Effectively converting your content into target languages and locales involves a host of decisions:

* Are graphic images in your marketing materials potentially misunderstood or offensive?
* How can instructive graphics of device and equipment operation be created to minimize translations costs?
* How can source-file document templates be designed to allow “breathing room” for target languages that will increase word count and paragraph depth?
* What computer settings are required to enable you to view content published for Asian markets?
* When generating multiple outputs from single source publishing, how can content best be organized for optimal results?
* How can you select and qualify in-country review staff within your company to ensure that target languages are optimized for your audience?
* How can you reduce the turn-around time for in-country review?
* What can you do while authoring new content to maximize the leveraging of content from legacy files?
* How can you monitor your project’s progress as it advances through various milestones on the translation vendor’s end?

Attend this session to find out answers to these and even more critical questions that will help get the most out of your translation budget. The world is waiting for your product and accessible information to use it. Don’t be left behind as your competitors reach even further into expanding global markets.

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  • 1. Best Practices for Translating, Localizing and Globalizing Content in Life Sciences Presented by Ann Zdunczyk June 25, 2008
  • 2. Agenda
    • A Glossary of terms:
    • Graphics! Are my graphics ready for translation?
    • Fonts!
    • Document layout: Best practices for document design?
    • Can I do the languages that I need with the application that I have?
    • Questions and answers
    CONFIDENTIAL
  • 3. A Glossary of terms:
    • Locale: “Combination of language, cultural preferences, character set, and other information that describes a particular target market or audience.”
    • Localization (L10N): “Process of adapting a product for a particular locale. Usually comes after internationalization in the shape of a package of services. ”
    • Globalization (G11N): “Combination of internationalization and localization, as well as implementation of a global strategy from early product development through localization .”
    • Internationalization (I18N): “Process of creating (or re-engineering) a system to support multiple locales with a single set of source code. Usually a pre-requisite for successful localization.”
  • 4.
    • Translation: “Process of translating, editing and proofing text .”
    • Translation Memory (TM): “a type of database that is used in software programs designed to aid human translators. Translation memories are typically used in conjunction with a dedicated computer assisted translation (CAT) tool, word processing program, terminology management systems, multilingual dictionary, or even raw machine translation output.”
      • Trados
      • SDL
      • déjà vu
    • Leveraging: “ability to re-use previously translated content from Translation Memory.”
  • 5.
    • Computer Assisted Translation (CAT): “a form of translation wherein a human translator translates texts using computer software designed to support and facilitate the translation process.”
    • Glossary: “agreed upon definitions of key words, phrases, product names. Can be in English only (source) or in target languages as well. Glossaries help linguists to avoid ambiguous or alternate translations.”
    • Machine Translation (MT): “performs simple substitution of words in one natural language for words in another. Using corpus techniques, more complex translations may be attempted, allowing for better handling of differences in linguistic typology, phrase recognition, and translation of idioms, as well as the isolation of anomalies.”
  • 6.
    • Simplified English: “ a controlled language originally developed for aerospace industry maintenance manuals. It offers a carefully limited and standardized subset of English. ”
      • Benefits:
      • Reduce ambiguity
      • Facilitate second language acquisition
      • Improve comprehension for people whose first language is not English
      • Make human translation cheaper and easier
      • Improve computer-assisted translation and machine translation
  • 7. Graphics! Are my graphics ready for translation?
    • A better question is “Do I have my original Graphics”.
    • What I mean by “original graphics” is the editable version of the graphic. If they are Illustrator, Photoshop, CorelDraw, Freehand, etc. there should be an editable version.
    • Graphics can drive you and the translation company NUTS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
  • 8.
    • If it is possible it is better to place the text in your Desktop Publishing Application rather than in the graphic itself. There are several reasons to do this:
      • The text can be extracted for translation along with the text in the document. This way all the text is done at one time.
      • You will only need one graphic for the document rather than one per language.
    • One way that you can do this is create a Legend. Place circle numbers “  ” on your graphic and then create a Legend that contains the callout information.
    • If you really need to place the text over the graphic then use “Text Boxes” and place them on the imported or placed graphic.
  • 9.
    • “ But, I lost my source Illustrator file! All I have is PDF!”
    No problem: we’ll just save the PDF to *.eps and bring it into Illustrator Cropped PDF of Graphic *.eps in Illustrator Now we can edit the “text layer” …NOT
  • 10.
    • Text Layer
    • Flattened Graphic
    Graphics that have been flattened have no text layer. Note that *.eps files can be expensively edited. In the worst case scenario, text “band aids” have to be manually pasted over flattened “text” or the flattened text is erased and new text has to be placed. GOOD BAD!!
  • 11. Fonts!
    • Fonts can be a MAJOR headache.
    • If your Company hired someone to create a Corporate font then we can hope that they also created the extended characters.
    • If you purchase your fonts from Font Foundries then they will usually have the extended characters.
    • Many applications are now Unicode compliant which means that if you are using the newer Unicode fonts that have the extended characters.
  • 12.
    • If you are still using old fonts then for some languages you will need to purchase additional fonts.
    • Languages such as French, Italian, German, Spanish, Portuguese, Danish, Dutch, Swedish and any other Western European languages can use the fonts that you used to create your English documentation.
    • Eastern European, Greek, Cyrillic, Turkish, Hebrew, Arabic, basically any languages that are not Western European will need additional fonts.
  • 13.
    • Mac versions Windows fonts.
    • Prior to Unicode the character mapping between Mac and Windows was different. For Western European languages this was not a problem. For other languages you would need to find a way to convert the character mapping.
    • Prior to OTF (Open Type Fonts) you needed to purchase fonts for the Mac and then for Windows if your Company used both. With OTF fonts then you only need to purchase one that can be used on both.
  • 14. Document layout: Best practices for document design?
      • Some target languages increase word count or text expansion by up to 30%
      • Containers like multiple columns, table cells and “boxed text” magnify the problem
      • Creating single page layout in a multi-page document stops text flow
  • 15.
    • For documents that must contain a set number of pages
      • Leave “breathing room” near bottom of page in English source files
    ENGLISH RUSSIAN
  • 16.
      • Even if you leave “breathing room” some languages will grow so that you will need to adjust the fonts size, kerning, leading etc. You want to make sure that you set a minimum for the translation company.
  • 17.
    • Using Styles
      • When creating documents today the best practice is to create styles. This allows for easy tagging of text in English as well as language.
      • A style tag contains the font family, size, kerning etc. that you need for a piece of text.
      • With style tags you can easily change the look of a specific piece of text.
      • Style tags also add consistency to your document.
  • 18.
      • You can create Paragraph and Character styles.
      • Paragraph Styles effect the entire paragraph.
      • Character Styles effect just a selected piece of text.
  • 19. Can I do the languages that I need with the application that I have?
      • If you are using older software then the answer depends on the languages
      • The newer software is now Unicode compliant, does languages much easier and works well with translation software
    • In the follow descriptions when I say “All” I really mean most of the languages that are being translated into as of today. There may still be some languages that you will have to check with the translation company.
  • 20.
    • QuarkXpress
      • Before Quark 7 (English version) you could do everything except Asian, Arabic, Hebrew right out of the box if you did not need hyphenation.
      • If you wanted hyphenation then you needed to purchase QuarkXpress PassPort and Xtensions for certain languages.
      • The drawback for this is that everyone that needed to open your documents also needed to have the same setup.
  • 21.
    • InDesign
      • InDesign English version will do all languages except Arabic and Hebrew.
      • InDesign ME (Middle Eastern Version) will do all languages including Arabic and Hebrew.
      • If your printer does not have the fonts for some of the languages that you create then you can provide them an “Outlined” version of the InDesign file
  • 22.
    • FrameMaker
      • FrameMaker prior to version 8 was not Unicode compliant.
      • Mac FrameMaker stopped at version 7
      • FrameMaker does not do Arabic or Hebrew
  • 23.
    • PageMaker
      • PageMaker was replaced several years ago by InDesign. Adobe decided that the underlying code was to old to upgrade.
      • PageMaker is still in use but if you can move to InDesign it would be a much better chose
      • PageMaker does not do Arabic or Hebrew
  • 24.
    • Illustrator
      • Illustrator English version will do all languages except Arabic and Hebrew.
      • Illustrator ME (Middle Eastern Version) will do all languages including Arabic and Hebrew.
      • If your printer does not have the fonts for some of the languages that you create then you can provide them an “Outlined” version of the Illustrator file
  • 25.
    • Photoshop
      • Photoshop English version will do all languages except Arabic and Hebrew.
      • Photoshop ME (Middle Eastern Version) will do all languages including Arabic and Hebrew.
      • If your printer does not have the fonts for some of the languages that you create then you can provide them a “Flattened” version of the Photoshop file
  • 26. Questions and answers CONFIDENTIAL