24 Ways to Shut Down The Application and Other Apocryphal Stories
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24 Ways to Shut Down The Application and Other Apocryphal Stories

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Presented by Dave Ashton at Documentation and Training West, May 6-9, 2008 in Vancouver, BC...

Presented by Dave Ashton at Documentation and Training West, May 6-9, 2008 in Vancouver, BC

The word apocryphal comes from the Greek word ἀπόκρυφα, meaning “those having been hidden away”. In this presentation, David will talk about the stories that companies like yours don’t want to tell. Learn about the 24 different ways one company used to “shut down your application” or how another company localizes devices and the accompanying documents to different languages. Then learn a little on how to manage this.

Within any complex organization, the content “conveyor belts” driven by specific business units deliver similar information through different routes—the authoring practices, rules and processes particular to that business unit. These conveyer belts all converge at the point when the content is distributed to the end customer—which is where the inconsistencies take their toll. When this information is also delivered in multiple languages the problem is exacerbated.

Authoring inconsistencies combined with localization to many markets can create havoc within an organization trying to create a single face for the customers. Learn how to avoid common pitfalls and achieve consistency in global authoring to optimize, cost, time and consistency.

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24 Ways to Shut Down The Application and Other Apocryphal Stories Presentation Transcript

  • 1. 24 Ways To Shut Down The Application (and 101 other apocryphal stories) David Ashton VP Global Information Management Solutions SDL International
  • 2. 24 Ways…
    • Application shutdown...
    • Application shutdown
    • Application will be shutdown
    • The application will shutdown.
    • The application will be shutdown.
    • Application will be shut down.
    • Application will shut down.
    • Application will be shutdown
    • The application will shut down.
    • The application will now shut down.
    • This application will be shut down.
    • The application will be shut down.
    • The Application will be shut down.
    • Current application will shut down.
    • Application Shutting down
    • Application Shutting Down
    • Shutting down Application.
    • Shutting Down Application...
    • Shutting down application...
    • Shutting down application
    • Shutting down app
    • Application is shutting down
    • Shutting down.
    • Shutting Down:
  • 3. And other apocryphal stories
    • The mobile phone handset manufacturer where docs are authored and published in US-EN with no concept of how they will get to the 50 other countries (that’s a different department…)
    • The consumer device manufacturer that didn’t synchronize the device languages with the doc translations.
    • The life sciences company that asked prospective Spanish employees to “Work hard and Gamble”
    • The global soft drinks manufacturer who can’t communicate concepts between one marketing department and another
  • 4. When the Wheels Fall Off the Bus… Famous Examples of Bad Translations © 2007 SDL International. Company Confidential. Forward-looking information is based upon multiple assumptions and uncertainties and does not necessarily represent the company’s outlook.
  • 5. Coca Cola The name Coca-Cola in China was first rendered as Ke-ke-ken-la . Unfortunately, the Coke company did not discover until after thousands of signs had been printed that the phrase means " bite the wax tadpole " or " female horse stuffed with wax " depending on the dialect. Coke then researched 40,000 Chinese characters and found a close phonetic equivalent, " ko-kou-ko-le ," which can be loosely translated as " happiness in the mouth ."
  • 6. Pepsi Pepsi's "Come Alive With the Pepsi Generation" translated into Chinese turned into… "Pepsi Brings Your Ancestors Back From the Grave"
  • 7. Got Milk? The Dairy Association's huge success with the campaign "Got Milk?" prompted them to expand advertising to Mexico. It was soon brought to their attention the Spanish translation read "Are You Lactating?"
  • 8. Gerber Later they learned that in Africa, companies routinely put pictures on the labels of what's inside, since many people can't read. When Gerber started selling baby food in Africa, they used the same packaging as in the US, with the smiling baby on the label. To add insult to injury, the word “ Gerber” is also the French word for vomiting.
  • 9. The Business Impact
    • “ There is no common vocabulary at Microsoft… Our lack of standardization undermines our trustworthiness.”
    • Craig Mundie, Chief Technical Officer
    • Solution: Trustworthy Computing initiative
    “… The customer expects to see consistent and timely information regardless of where and how it is published.” Alison Toon, Translation & Localization Manager Solution: One World initiative “ New products need to be launched simultaneously across all markets… Our quality and consistency were suffering, leading to poor communications with customers and potentially damaging the Philips’ brand.” Luuk de Jager, Global Content Management Senior Manager Solution: One Face to the Customer initiative
  • 10. Why does it have to be this way?
    • Each ecosystem is a natural silo
      • Creates its own language
      • Builds its own content supply chain
      • Builds it’s own vision
      • Shares ideas with other ecosystems through personal relationships
    • R&D/Engineering
      • Core product
      • User interfaces
      • Labeling
      • Documentation & help
    • Marketing
      • Advertising
      • Promotions
      • Web presence
    • Service/Support
      • Consumer information
      • Customer contact
      • Web FAQs
      • Day to day contact
    • Operations
      • Compliance docs
      • Bill of materials
      • Custom documentation
    • Sales
      • Sales collateral
      • RFP/RFP
      • Proposals
  • 11. Why it is this way. Content Content Content Content
  • 12. Problems of the multinational strategy
    • What’s happening underneath?
      • Time to market and growth problems.
        • Pockets of information trapped in regions held in ‘foreign’ languages while much Intellectual Capital held only in ‘source’ language
        • Content is repeatedly recreated adding inconsistencies, inaccuracies and cost each time
        • Solutions presented are based on information to hand, not the sum of corporate Intellectual Capital
      • Customer Satisfaction Issues
        • Call centers and support centers create or parse content in isolation
        • Consumer/customer response teams present inconsistent information to customers
      • Inconsistent ‘brand’
        • Strong regional or divisional managers ‘know better what OUR customers need’
        • Product groups put product-brand over corporate interest
        • Sales, Marketing, Web/IT, Procurement, Legal, Engineering, TechPubs etc all have their own view of the ‘right’ thing to say
  • 13. Content is global from the day it is written
    • Global markets are an assumed part of corporate strategy
    • NA itself has (at least) three languages
    • Once content is provided through the internet anyone/anywhere can access it BUT
    • Content is often written by non-native speakers in a unmanaged style,
    • Then translated by non-professional translators on an ad-hoc basis
  • 14.
    • Content has different readers
      • Technical and non-technical audience
      • Native and non-native English readers
      • Non-English reader… how are we getting this content to them?
    • Significant business impacts
      • Brand perceptions through consistency
      • Customer satisfaction
      • Regulatory and legal compliance
    • The source of content impacts the quality of translated output, particularly automated translation
      • Existing linguistic tools work better with consistent source styles
      • A machine translates more effectively if terms are consistent and sentence constructs are correct
    What do we need to think about?
  • 15. Would the ‘real world’ please step forward?
    • Kelly Martin
    • Translator
    • Works for translation vendor
    • Translates English to Chinese
    • Comfortable with known tools
    • Paul Smith
    • Validator / Reviewer
    • Works in China
    • Validates / reviews for Robert
    • Bill Brown
    • Business Owner
    • ‘ Owns’ content creation
    • Authors write in English:
      • Arbortext
      • Word
      • FrameMaker
    • Reviews and authorizes
    • Doesn’t really understand why it takes so long to get the translation done OR why there are so many mistakes.
    • Robert Himmel
    • Localization Manager
    • Coordinates localization efforts
      • Determines costs
      • Authorizes translation
      • Plans and schedules
      • Coordinates resources
      • Manages linguistic resources
      • Reviews translated content
    • Very busy. Tries to act as the middle-man between business owners, other stakeholders (legal, marketing etc.) and vendors.
  • 16. The problem with “Bill” and “Robert”
    • Bill’s problem around authoring
      • Bill’s feedback from customers is that the product documents don’t match the products themselves. This is bad enough in the English language but terrible in other languages.
      • Making the content available in other languages is time consuming, expensive and the resultant content is often of poor quality.
    • Impact
      • Content is created and re-created in each authors own language with the authors departmental bias with no global audience context.
      • Cost of sale, time to market and customer satisfaction all have quantifiable cost to the organization.
    • Solution
      • Provide authors, reviewers and managers access to same linguistic, terminology and stylistic guides that are available to the translation team.
      • Provide those resources inside the applications the authors already use.
    Engineers, Technical Writers, Lawyers, Sales, Marketing, Web/IT, Regional Business Managers, Procurement, Project members etc.
  • 17. Global Authoring Management Central server-based access for enterprise-wide consistency
  • 18. AuthorAssistant
  • 19.  
  • 20. 24 Ways…
    • Application shutdown...
    • Application shutdown
    • Application will be shutdown
    • The application will shutdown.
    • The application will be shutdown.
    • Application will be shut down.
    • Application will shut down.
    • Application will be shutdown
    • The application will shut down.
    • The application will now shut down.
    • This application will be shut down.
    • The application will be shut down.
    • The Application will be shut down.
    • Current application will shut down.
    • Application Shutting down
    • Application Shutting Down
    • Shutting down Application.
    • Shutting Down Application...
    • Shutting down application...
    • Shutting down application
    • Shutting down app
    • Application is shutting down
    • Shutting down.
    • Shutting Down: