Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Twitter For Customer Engagement
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×

Saving this for later?

Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime - even offline.

Text the download link to your phone

Standard text messaging rates apply

Twitter For Customer Engagement

2,735
views

Published on

Twitter is a communication platform with many uses by many people. Many roles in an organization can benefit from using it to better engage with customers. Here is a primer on how to get started.

Twitter is a communication platform with many uses by many people. Many roles in an organization can benefit from using it to better engage with customers. Here is a primer on how to get started.

Published in: Technology

1 Comment
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
No Downloads
Views
Total Views
2,735
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
67
Comments
1
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide
  • I replaced the content that was relevant to my company with something else.image source/s: screen caps from Internet sites
  • http://www.slideshare.net/CometBranding/comet-social-media-pr-presentation http://www.briansolis.com/
  • http://twitter.com/weddingplantips
  • Syntax: add # and then a word (no spaces) – that’s what makes it a hashtaghttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hashtag#Hash_tags http://www.hashtags.org/ {has been up and down; a great site, but not entirely reliable at the moment}Link to other hashtag resources: http://delicious.com/abelniak/hashtagshttp://search.twitter.com/search?q=&ands=&phrase=&ors=&nots=&tag=FollowFriday&lang=en&from=&to=&ref=&near=&within=15&units=mi&since=&until=&rpp=15http://search.twitter.com/search?q=&ands=&phrase=&ors=&nots=&tag=redsox&lang=en&from=&to=&ref=&near=&within=15&units=mi&since=&until=&rpp=15http://search.twitter.com/search?q=&ands=&phrase=&ors=&nots=&tag=Toyota&lang=all&from=&to=&ref=&near=&within=15&units=mi&since=&until=&rpp=15
  • sources: http://www.techcrunch.com/2009/10/27/hashceratops-aims-to-formally-add-place-tagging-to-the-twitter-stream/ ; http://hashceratops.org/tutorial
  • image source: http://bit.ly screen cap
  • image sources: http://bit.ly screen capsource data: http://bit.ly/info/3gEMog
  • image source: http://bit.ly screen cap
  • http://socialmediagovernance.com/policies.php
  • Instant grass/sod versus seed/water/nurturingImage sources: http://www.ocoee.org/Departments/PU/images/sod.jpg ; http://cdn-viper.demandvideo.com/media/c969abed-8dad-46a9-ba8d-00c699de9271/jpeg/d7505d7e-0865-4289-9326-a8771178c99e_2.jpg
  • Transcript

    • 1. Using Twitter for Customer Engagement
      January 2010
      Alan Belniak
      @abelniak
    • 2. Agenda
      2
    • 3. Agenda
      3
      What is Twitter and Why is It Important
      What’s Our Company’s Presence with Twitter all About
      Who is Involved and What’s the Philosophy
      Vocabulary
      Typical Steps
      Re-tweeting
      #hashtags and bit.ly
      Frequency: the ol’ Quality vs. Quantity dilemma
      Tools
      CoTweet
      Other Resources
    • 4. PART I: WAIT… THE WHO AND THE WHAT NOW?
      WHAT IS TWITTER
      WHAT IS OUR INVOLVEMENT WITH TWITTER
      WHO IS INVOLVED? WHAT’S THE PHILOSOPHY?
      4
    • 5. What is Twitter… and why is it important
      Micro-blogging
      140 characters
      It’s not the same as Facebook or LinkedIn where you request to be friends
      note the verb… not ‘friend’; instead, ‘follow’ (no permission required)
      5
    • 6. What is Twitter…and why is it important
      It started small, and is now growing
      Used often by marketers as a way to get real-time reactions and do marketing research
      real-time search
      brand management
      other uses
      Thereality is that Twitter is a platform that permits all kinds of things. It isn’t one tool, and it isn’t for everyone.
      6
    • 7. Companies’ customers are using Twitter
      Slideshare
      Swiffer
      Duracell
      Dogfish Head
      7
    • 8. What is (and will be) our presence with Twitter?
      I created seven Twitter IDs, one each of our major product families.
      This allows our messages to be segmented.
      We will start to use this to
      listen to what customers have to say, and push out messages to customers
      together, we will engage our customers
      This may seem like it is just another task to add to your list. But this supports your role in…
      marketing
      product management
      tech support
      it is really another tool (not another task) to help you do what you are already doing
      8
    • 9. Not all Tweets have to focus on your product or service
      Method’s (the cleaning product)Twitter feed – note that not all tweets are related directly to their products
      9
    • 10. Who is involved? What’s the philosophy?
      You all reading this (and probably others)
      Let’s face it: media 2.0 isn't going away
      The meta-lesson of this education applies to all social media, and not just Twitter
      Our customers are online, and social media gives them a loud(er) voice.
      We can not engage through these channels
      we run the risk of alienating some of our customers that are using this and similar channels by not connecting with them there
      Or, we can engage with our customers
      start to build up brand trust, confidence, and loyalty
      10
    • 11. Has anyone not heard about the Comcast story?
      11
      Look at the results for a Google search on ‘Comcast Cares’
      Look what’s in the first position
      Comcast pulled itself out of a deep PR well by engaging
    • 12. Another reason…
      12
      Brian is kind of a big deal in the PR and social media space…
      Translation: Lots of people listen to what he has to say
    • 13. PART II: DIGGING IN
      VOCABULARY
      TYPICAL STEPS
      RE-TWEET: IT’S NOT A STUTTERING BIRD
      HASHTAGS and BIT.LY
      13
    • 14. Vocabulary
      Twitter (n)
      tweet (n)
      tweet (v) or twitter (v)
      follower number and following number
      "the ratio"
      profile
      locked and blocked
      @ or @ message or at message or reply or mentions
      14
      DM or direct message
      Re-tweet, or RT (this is very important, as it helps you gain ‘street cred’)
      # or hash tags
      Fail Whale
      FTW, FTL, and other such used acronyms (http://www.acronymfinder.com/)
      FF or Follow Friday
    • 15. Typical steps (1 of 2)
      Set up your own account at www.twitter.com(user ID, password, an e-mail address)
      This will be useful to help get you acclimated on your own, before tweeting on behalf of the company
      Submit a picture or somehow-related avatar, create your profile
      Be real. Be human. (more on this in a minute)
      Send out a test tweet, dip your toe in thewater
      Use @ messages to start generating some interest for your own account
      15
    • 16. Typical steps (2 of 2)
      Re-tweet, recommend people, and start engaging - helping and sharing are two huge currencies in social media
      You’ll soon realize that using the http://www.twitter.com interface gets tired quickly
      consider one of the many tools freely available (like Tweetdeck)
      The notes section of this slide has additional detail, and sites to click through to help amass people to follow
      16
    • 17. A Quick Note on Twitter Lists
      Your account page - see the lists you created/the lists with which you’re involved
      This means the ones you follow, and where you are listed.
      Mass-following some of these lists is a good way to start getting your own followers
      Consider pasting the URL of a Twitter list into TweepML.org
      Also, search TweepML.org for interesting lists
      17
    • 18. An example of not being human
      Poor ratio, likely due to the content
      Same message, over and over and over again
      18
    • 19. Re-Tweeting: what’s the big deal?
      Summary of why it is important
      Usual syntax
      Add a follow-on message if you like
      Avoid re-tweeting someone who re-tweets you. This isn’t to say not to do it, but note that it can appear self-serving.
      Keep in mind the 140 characters; if you want someone to re-tweet you, give them room!
      19
    • 20. #hashtags
      Think of hashtags as bookmarks… or… tags
      Emergent – not sanctioned or issued by decree
      folksonomy vs. prescriptive vocabulary
      Syntax
      Useful for linking groups of tweets together
      e.g.: FollowFriday, or Red Sox, or Toyota
      Popular at conferences and seminars to track the conversation in the backchannel
      e.g.: South by Southwest (#sxsw)
      Advice…
      Don’t use a hashtag that’s too long – remember, the # and hashtag text are factored into the 140-character limit
      Do use a hashtag that makes sense and is easy to use
      20
    • 21. #hashtag effective practices
      21
      http://hashceratops.org/tutorial
    • 22. bit.ly
      URL shortening service (http://bit.ly/)
      Reduces the length of long URLs to save room in Twitter’s 140-character limit
      http://www.readwriteweb.com/readwritestart/2009/10/6-great-twitter-quiz-and-polli.php - (85 characters long)
      http://bit.ly/2yLZFM - (points to the same link, and is only 20 characters long)
      Gives some insights into clicks on a link (screen shots on following slides)
      Can be linked to a Twitter account for one-stop shopping
      example: swipe a URL, go to http://bit.ly, paste the URL, and Tweet out that link directly from the bit.ly page – no need to go back to www.Twitter.com
      22
    • 23. bit.ly data
      Number of clicks from when you Tweeted it
      Number of total clicks (others can create a short link of the same long URL)
      Listing of where conversations are happening
      Time of day and date information
      Reference source and locations over the world
      23
    • 24. more bit.ly data
      24
    • 25. bit.ly’s link to Twitter account
      25
    • 26. PART III: YOU, TWITTER, and YOUR COMPANY
      HOW DOES THIS RELATE TO OUR TWITTER PRESENCE?
      HOW OFTEN SHOULD I TWEET TWITTER SEND A TWITTER MESSAGE?
      MY OWN ACCOUNT, COMPANY ACCOUNTS – HOW DO I MANAGE IT ALL?
      26
    • 27. How do I manage the flow?
      Consider creating e-mail aliases (work w/ IT) to have content automatically distributed
      An e-mail address is necessary when creating a Twitter ID, so consider using the ones you create here
      Another way to stay on top of the content is through RSS
      Learn how to use an RSS reader
      Get Twitter searches sent as an RSS: http://search.twitter.com/advanced
      Or, use FeedMyInbox – an RSS feed delivered in e-mail form, but only once a day(a digest version)
      27
    • 28. Frequency: quality over quantity, but in the right volume
      Our (initial) internal recommendation: a minimum of one quality tweet per day from each account
      Set up an internal group (a wiki, a Google doc, etc.) of content you can share so you’re not all always scrambling for this
      Set up a recurring reminder in Outlook (tasks or calendar entries)
      Pre-create tweets of items (saved in the wiki or some other source, and copy and tweet at will, for you get writer’s block)
      Good topics include: product news , company news, link to a press release (with a relevant comment) benchmark data… (cont’d)
      28
    • 29. Frequency (continued)
      Conduct an informal poll – ask a question, engage the audience (see notes)
      Look at what your other company products are tweeting and perhaps link (RT) from them, if appropriate
      Use @replies to others in your stream
      This is what it’s all about!
      What’s the competition doing? Can you comment on that (being professional and courteous at all times) ?
      Don’t simply tweet inane, mundane information. Make it valuable. Don’t follow Twitter’s old advice (“What are you doing?”).
      Instead, answer, “what are you reading? What excites you? What is it about the event you are attending that is interesting (and not just what is happening)?”
      29
    • 30. Frequency (continued)
      Conduct an informal poll – ask a question, engage the audience (see notes)
      Look at what your other company products are tweeting and perhaps link (RT) from them, if appropriate
      Use @replies to others in your stream
      This is what it’s all about!
      What’s the competition doing? Can you comment on that (being professional and courteous at all times) ?
      Don’t simply tweet inane, mundane information. Make it valuable. Don’t follow Twitter’s old advice (“What are you doing?”).
      Instead, answer, “what are you reading? What excites you? What is it about the event you are attending that is interesting (and not just what is happening)?”
      30
      Key message: do whatever it is you need to do to make this a regular part of your day, time-boxed so it fits into your schedule, and coordinated with your other team members so it appears (from the outside, at least) as a well-oiled machine.
    • 31. Guidelines
      Does your company have any guidelines? You might want to make some. Go here to get started.
      Essentially an extension of an employee handbook. Don’t over-think them. Ours are summarized below.
      DO
      Be authentic – disclose who you are and for whom you work
      Be positive – this is a chance to engage with people; pretend it’s like meeting them for the first time at a party
      Be respectful
      DON’T
      Lie or pretend to be someone else – authenticity matters
      Be negative with respect to the competition
      Disclose sensitive information, especially with respect to earnings, acquisitions, or recent deals (unless pre-approved)
      REMEMBER
      Whether you think you are or you aren’t, you are always representing the brand
      31
    • 32. CoTweet
      www.CoTweet.com
      the site
      support
      Lets multiple people tweet through one account
      Lets one person tweet through multiple accounts
      32
    • 33. PART IV: REFERENCE
      SITES TO HELP YOU UNDERSTAND MORE
      MISCELLANEOUS
      33
    • 34. Sites to help you understand more
      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ddO9idmax0o&rel=0&color1=0xb1b1b1&color2=0xcfcfcf&fs=1 – Twitter in plain English (CommonCraft video)
      http://mashable.com/2009/06/24/twitter-brand-best-practices/ - Twitter best practices for brands
      http://thesocialmediaguide.com.au/2009/05/30/the-ultimate-list-of-twitter-tools/ - Desktop and Web Clients
      www.twitter.com/ and then a user name
      http://search.twitter.com/advanced –? :) :( {sentiment}
      http://www.bit.ly –URL shortener
      http://www.hashtags.org/ - good to see what’s been said around a hashtag
      http://pelfusion.com/tools/30-twitter-tools-for-managing-followers/ - tools to manage followers
      34
    • 35. Still more
      http://www.gradontripp.com/2009/08/27/can-you-judge-a-book-by-its-cover-umm-maybe/ - notes on why your bio and profile matter
      http://business.twitter.com/twitter101/ - a Twitter 101 Guide
      http://business.twitter.com/twitter101/best_practices - best practices
      http://danzarrella.com/retweet-etiquette.html - tips to increase your chances of getting re-tweeted
      http://mashable.com/2009/10/06/retweetable-tweets/ - more tips to increase your chances of getting re-tweeted
      http://tweetbeep.com/ - tweets sent by e-mail on the hour
      http://mashable.com/2009/05/23/video-for-twitter/ - sharing video via Twitter
      http://mashable.com/2009/05/19/twitter-share-images/ - sharing pictures (also see www.yfrog.com)
      35
    • 36. … it never stops
      http://www.chrisbrogan.com/50-ideas-on-using-twitter-for-business/ - great list of ideas
      http://www.OneRiot.com, http://www.Collecta.com, and http://search.twitter.com/advanced - social pulse aggregators
      http://translate.google.com/translate_t#
      http://www.subjectivelyspeaking.net/?p=201 – how not to use Twitter
      http://delicious.com/abelniak/twitter+howto?detail=2 – a curated list of Twitter tools
      http://business.twitter.com/twitter101/case_dell - case studies
      http://business.twitter.com/twitter101/resources - other Twitter resources
      http://mashable.com/2009/01/21/best-twitter-brands/ - 40 brands on Twitter (you’ve heard of these brands)
      http://mashable.com/2009/07/03/twitter-filter/ - filter your Twitter stream
      http://mashable.com/guidebook/twitter/ - The Twitter Guidebook by Mashable! (the closest thing to the definitive source on Twitter; some of the links in this list are repeated here)
      36
    • 37. Call To Action
      Create your own account and test the waters
      Start generating some of your own followers
      Look for a meeting request from me to talk about CoTweet, and to get the company accounts log-in information
      Work with your teammates to set up a cadence and schedule that might work for you
      Think of questions for each other, and for me
      Ask me questions
      Share content and experiences
      37
    • 38. Summary
      You can say a lot with 140 characters
      Connecting to customers on Twitter aligns with our corporate social media strategy
      This is a shared challenge and responsibility, across many organizations and functions – let’s make the most of it!
      Use this deck as a reference; share what you learn with the others
      Focus on quality, and create a cadence of communication that’s right for you
      Use the tools available to ease any perceived burden and optimize your time
      Start!
      38
    • 39. Parting thought
      You want this…
      But you’ve got to go through this…
      39
      *minus the boots
    • 40. Thank You
      Alan Belniak
      @abelniak // http://www.twitter.com/abelniak
      http://www.SubjectivelySpeaking.net