Starter: pick a questionRehearse an answer. Use a short quote or quotes. Paraphrase it.[Para. 1] Which is more vivid: perc...
Hume: Of the Origin of IdeasRadical empiricism, scepticism about   abstract ideas, the Problem of              Induction
Hume’s Radical Empiricism• “All ideas are copies of impressions...it is impossible for us to  think of anything which we h...
Forking Hell: it’s Hume’s Fork!• “All the objects of human reason or enquiry may naturally be divided into  two kinds, to ...
Hume’s Scepticism:                 what’s on his Fork?• “…when I look about me, I foresee on every  hand, dispute, contrad...
‘Substance’• Some philosophers found much of their reasonings on the distinction of  substance... I would fain ask them wh...
‘The Self’•   There are some philosophers who imagine we are every moment intimately    conscious of what we call our self...
‘Cause and effect’•   There is no idea in metaphysics more obscure or uncertain than necessary    connection between cause...
‘Free will’• The most irregular and unexpected resolutions of men may be  accounted for by those who know every particular...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

8c. initial pp on hume for upload

437

Published on

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
437
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
5
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

8c. initial pp on hume for upload

  1. 1. Starter: pick a questionRehearse an answer. Use a short quote or quotes. Paraphrase it.[Para. 1] Which is more vivid: perception, or recollection? Explain in some detail.[Para. 1] ‘Thought is a copy or mirror’ – of what, and what are its reflections like when compared to the real deal?[Para. 2] Define ‘thoughts or ideas’; contrast ‘impressions’ with them…[Para. 3] What powers does thought seem to have, first of all?[Para 4] What are the actual creative powers of the mind?[Para 4, 5 ] Contrast Hume’s descriptions of ideas and impressions. Give an example of each.[Para 5] What, for Hume, is troublesome about ‘metaphysical reasonings’?[Para 5] What is Hume’s KEY QUESTION? What does he suggest he thinks about the origin of all our thoughts?
  2. 2. Hume: Of the Origin of IdeasRadical empiricism, scepticism about abstract ideas, the Problem of Induction
  3. 3. Hume’s Radical Empiricism• “All ideas are copies of impressions...it is impossible for us to think of anything which we have not antecedently felt by our senses...”• “When we entertain any suspicion in a philosophical term, we need but inquire from what impression is that supposed idea derived. If it be not possible to assign any, this will serve to confirm our suspicion that it is employed without meaning…”• “A blind man can form no notion of colours; a deaf man of sounds. Restore either of them that sense in which he is deficient; by opening this new inlet for his sensations, you also open an inlet for the ideas; and he finds no difficulty in conceiving these objects.”
  4. 4. Forking Hell: it’s Hume’s Fork!• “All the objects of human reason or enquiry may naturally be divided into two kinds, to wit. Relations of Ideas, and Matters of Fact.”• Of the first kind are the sciences of Geometry, Algebra, and Arithmetic...discoverable by the mere operation of thought ...• Matters of Fact, which are the second object of human reason, are not ascertained in the same manner; nor is our evidence of their truth, however great, of a like nature with the foregoing.• …If we take in hand any volume, of divinity or metaphysics, for instance, let us ask: Does it contain any reasoning concerning quantity or number? No. Does it contain any experimental (probable) reasoning concerning matter of fact? No. Commit it then to the flames: for it can contain nothing but sophistry and illusion.
  5. 5. Hume’s Scepticism: what’s on his Fork?• “…when I look about me, I foresee on every hand, dispute, contradiction, anger, calumny, detraction. Whe n I turn my eye inward, I find only doubt and ignorance.”• Paired discussion: What abstract ideas does Hume undermine on the next four slides? – In a word or phrase – what’s he attacking? – What argument does he offer?
  6. 6. ‘Substance’• Some philosophers found much of their reasonings on the distinction of substance... I would fain ask them whether the idea of substance be derived from impressions of sensations or impressions of reflection? If it be convey’d to us by our senses, I ask, which of them; and after what manner? If it be perceiv’d by the eyes, it must be a colour; if by the ears, a sound; if by the palate, a taste; and so of the other senses. But I believe none will assert, that substance is either a colour, or sound, or a taste…• The idea of substance is nothing but a collection of simple ideas, united by the imagination and given a particular name by which we are able to recall that collection. The particular qualities which form a substance are commonly referred to an unknown something in which they are supposed to "inhere"…[this is] a fiction.• ‘Substance’ (= ‘Matter’) is just a ‘collection of simple ideas’
  7. 7. ‘The Self’• There are some philosophers who imagine we are every moment intimately conscious of what we call our self; that we feel its existence and its continuance in existence, and are certain of its identity and simplicity.• For my part, when I enter most intimately into what I call my self, I always stumble on some particular perception or other, of heat or cold, light or shade, love or hatred, pain or pleasure, color or sound, etc. I never catch my self, distinct from some such perception.• I may venture to affirm of the rest of mankind that they are nothing but a bundle or collections of different perceptions which succeed each other with an inconceivable rapidity and are in a perpetual flux and movement.• The mind (or self) is a kind of theatre where perceptions make their appearances, pass, repass, glide away, and mingle in an infinite variety…the actors come and go. But there is no simplicity, no one simple thing present or pervading this multiplicity; no identity pervading this process of change…• As memory alone acquaints us with the continuance and extent of a succession of perceptions, it is to be considered…the source of personal identity … so arises the fiction of person and personal identity.• The Self is merely a ‘bundle of sensations’
  8. 8. ‘Cause and effect’• There is no idea in metaphysics more obscure or uncertain than necessary connection between cause and effect. We shall try to fix the precise meaning of this terms by producing the impression from which it is copied.• When we look at external objects, and consider the operation of causes, we are never able, in a single instance, to discover a necessary connection; any quality which binds the effect to the cause, and renders one a necessary consequence of the other. We find only that the effect does, in fact, follow the cause. The impact of one billiard ball upon another is followed by the motion of the second. There is here contiguity in space and time, but nothing to suggest necessary connection.• Why do we imagine a necessary connection? From observing many constant conjunctions? But what is there in a number of instances which is absent from a single instance? Only this: After a repetition of similar instances the mind is carried by habit, upon the appearance of the cause, to expect the effect. This connection, which we feel in the mind, this customary and habitual transition of the imagination from a cause to its effect, is the impression from which we form the idea of necessary connection. There is nothing further in the case.• (Necessary) Cause and effect is just ‘constant conjunction’
  9. 9. ‘Free will’• The most irregular and unexpected resolutions of men may be accounted for by those who know every particular circumstance of their character and situation. A genial person, contrary to expectation, may give a peevish answer, but he has a toothache or has not dined. Even when, as sometimes happens, an action cannot be accounted for, do we not put it down to our ignorance of relevant details?• Thus it appears that the conjunction between motive and action is as regular and uniform as between cause and effect in any part of nature. In both cases, constant conjunction and inference from one to the other.• ‘Free will’ is merely our ignorance of cause and effect. Cause and effect is itself an illusion. So free will…
  1. A particular slide catching your eye?

    Clipping is a handy way to collect important slides you want to go back to later.

×