*Prior to any manipulation of flight
controls in the Robinson Helicopter
one must successful pass and
complete the SFAR73 ...
PREFLIGHT
The first step a pilot must take is to ensure that the aircraft is within airworthy
condition.
 Checking the ro...
MINIMUM EQUIPMENT LISTS (MELS) AND
OPERATIONS WITH INOPERATIVE EQUIPMENT
“Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations (14 ...
ENGINE START AND ROTOR ENGAGEMENT
First complete the check list
Next make sure persons and equipment is clear from the hel...
ROTOR SAFETY CONSIDERATIONS
The rotor system produces high velocities of wind which can cause sand, dust,
snow, ice and wa...
AIRCRAFT SERVICING
Typically the aircraft is grounded and rotor blades have stopped moving
prior to refueling
Hot refuelin...
SAFETY IN AND AROUND HELICOPTERS
Safety around the helicopter is extremely important to your passengers.
Passengers can ea...
Passengers boarding while rotor is turning should:
1. stay away from the rear of the helicopter
2. approach or leave the h...
Preflight safety
Preflight safety
Preflight safety
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Preflight safety

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Preflight safety

  1. 1. *Prior to any manipulation of flight controls in the Robinson Helicopter one must successful pass and complete the SFAR73 Awareness Training. If you have NOT completed this training please see the navigator for the SFAR73 awareness training section and Helicopter Emergencies and Hazards section.
  2. 2. PREFLIGHT The first step a pilot must take is to ensure that the aircraft is within airworthy condition.  Checking the rotorcraft flight manual (RFM)  Pilot’s operating handbook (POH)  Or other information supplied by the operator or manufacturer Use the checklist to ensure that no item is overlooked, it is important when preflighting the aircraft. Inspect the inside and the outside using the checklist. Helicopter Flying Handbook 2012
  3. 3. MINIMUM EQUIPMENT LISTS (MELS) AND OPERATIONS WITH INOPERATIVE EQUIPMENT “Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR) requires that all aircraft instruments and installed equipment be operative prior to each departure. However, when the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) adopted the minimum equipment list (MEL) concept for 14 CFR part 91 operations, flights were allowed with inoperative items, as long as the inoperative items were determined to be nonessential for safe flight.” *in the Robinson Helicopter use the acronym GOAL-H. This is for: G-governor O-outside air temperature gauge A-alternator L-low rotor RPM warning system H-helicopter control or trim Helicopter Flying Handbook 2012
  4. 4. ENGINE START AND ROTOR ENGAGEMENT First complete the check list Next make sure persons and equipment is clear from the helicopter Make sure the rotor blades are NOT aligned with the fuselage. Have blade off set or perpendicular to the fuselage (for pilot in command to visually see rotor blades) Helicopter Flying Handbook 2012
  5. 5. ROTOR SAFETY CONSIDERATIONS The rotor system produces high velocities of wind which can cause sand, dust, snow, ice and water to blow causing injuries to people and objects within the area. Sand and snow can also be ingested into the engine intake that can cause filters to be overwhelmed and cutoff air to the engine. Avoiding this is important to start up. Helicopter Flying Handbook 2012
  6. 6. AIRCRAFT SERVICING Typically the aircraft is grounded and rotor blades have stopped moving prior to refueling Hot refueling is when the turbine aircraft blades continue to rotate. This can be hazardous if not done properly. It should only be done when necessary. Smoking must to avoided in and around the aircraft especially during refueling. Helicopter Flying Handbook 2012
  7. 7. SAFETY IN AND AROUND HELICOPTERS Safety around the helicopter is extremely important to your passengers. Passengers can easily be injured if proper precautions are not taken. Simplest way to avoid an accident with a passenger and the rotor system is to completely stop the blades from rotating. If this is not possible it is important to explain to passengers how to exit the helicopter when blades are rotating. Helicopter Flying Handbook 2012
  8. 8. Passengers boarding while rotor is turning should: 1. stay away from the rear of the helicopter 2. approach or leave the helicopter in a crouching manner 3. approach from the side but never out of the pilot’s line of vision. Many helicopters have dipping front blades due to landing gear configuration. From that reason, it is uniformly accepted for personnel to approach from the sides of the helicopter. Personnel should always be cautioned about approaching from the rear due to the tail rotor hazard, even for helicopters such as the BO-105 and BK-117. 4. carry tools horizontally, below waist level- never upright or over the shoulder. 5. hold firmly onto hats and loose articles. 6. never reach up or dart after a hat or other object that might be blown off or away. 7. protect eyes by shielding them with a hand or by squinting. 8. if suddenly blinded by dust or a blowing object, stop and crouch lower; better yet, sit down and wait for help. 9. never grope or feel your way toward or away form the helicopter 10. protect hearing by wearing earplugs or earmuffs.

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