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Designelements+principles

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  • 1. Design Elements
  • 2. Elements: Line
    • Consider the following when using line:
    • Have you chosen lines that convey an appropriate mood or strengthen your idea in some way? Have you given thought to the full array of possible types of line you might use (thick vs. thin, sharp vs. fuzzy, wavy vs. straight)?
  • 3. Elements: Line
    • Consider the following when using line:
    • Have you chosen lines that convey an appropriate mood or strengthen your idea in some way? Have you given thought to the full array of possible types of line you might use (thick vs. thin, sharp vs. fuzzy, wavy vs. straight)?
    • How do lines you have chosen organize your design? Are you using line to connect or separate other elements on the page? Do these lines actually lead the eye in the ways you intend? Have you thought of using a border as a design element?
  • 4. Elements: Line
    • Consider the following when using line:
    • Have you chosen lines that convey an appropriate mood or strengthen your idea in some way? Have you given thought to the full array of possible types of line you might use (thick vs. thin, sharp vs. fuzzy, wavy vs. straight)?
    • How do lines you have chosen organize your design? Are you using line to connect or separate other elements on the page? Do these lines actually lead the eye in the ways you intend? Have you thought of using a border as a design element?
    • Are you able to use lines to establish a grid? That is, are lines used to support columns of type or photographs, and do these lines appear in the same position from page to page, giving your design structure and unity? (An underlying grid can be very useful, even if the grid lines are invisible in the design.)
  • 5. Elements: Line
    • Consider the following when using line:
    • Have you chosen lines that convey an appropriate mood or strengthen your idea in some way? Have you given thought to the full array of possible types of line you might use (thick vs. thin, sharp vs. fuzzy, wavy vs. straight)?
    • How do lines you have chosen organize your design? Are you using line to connect or separate other elements on the page? Do these lines actually lead the eye in the ways you intend? Have you thought of using a border as a design element?
    • Are you able to use lines to establish a grid? That is, are lines used to support columns of type or photographs, and do these lines appear in the same position from page to page, giving your design structure and unity? (An underlying grid can be very useful, even if the grid lines are invisible in the design.)
    • Does your use of line create texture in your design or illustrations? Does this texture reinforce your idea?
  • 6. Elements: Line
    • Consider the following when using line:
    • Have you chosen lines that convey an appropriate mood or strengthen your idea in some way? Have you given thought to the full array of possible types of line you might use (thick vs. thin, sharp vs. fuzzy, wavy vs. straight)?
    • How do lines you have chosen organize your design? Are you using line to connect or separate other elements on the page? Do these lines actually lead the eye in the ways you intend? Have you thought of using a border as a design element?
    • Are you able to use lines to establish a grid? That is, are lines used to support columns of type or photographs, and do these lines appear in the same position from page to page, giving your design structure and unity? (An underlying grid can be very useful, even if the grid lines are invisible in the design.)
    • Does your use of line create texture in your design or illustrations? Does this texture reinforce your idea?
    • Are you using line wisely? Are there lines in your design that are “freeloading” on the design—not performing a service of any kind? (Remember to reduce your design down to only the core elements.)
  • 7. Elements: Line Question: How would you illustrate a gathering? First, add all the elements you can think of that help convey the idea (ex. A). Then, begin to eliminate elements you don’t need (ex. B). Lastly, keep (and arrange the minimum amount of elements you need to convey your idea (ex. C).
  • 8. Elements: Type
    • Consider the following when using type:
    • What type style will best communicate the feeling of your message? Does your typeface harmonize with or detract from your message?
  • 9. Elements: Type
    • Consider the following when using type:
    • What type style will best communicate the feeling of your message? Does your typeface harmonize with or detract from your message?
    • Will two or more different type styles be more effective in displaying the concept than one? (Consider combining a serif face with a sans serif face, for example.)
  • 10. Elements: Type
    • Consider the following when using type:
    • What type style will best communicate the feeling of your message? Does your typeface harmonize with or detract from your message?
    • Will two or more different type styles be more effective in displaying the concept than one? (Consider combining a serif face with a sans serif face, for example.)
    • What size type will best convey the idea of the design? Is the size appropriate for the audience? Does it complement the other elements?
  • 11. Elements: Type
    • Consider the following when using type:
    • What type style will best communicate the feeling of your message? Does your typeface harmonize with or detract from your message?
    • Will two or more different type styles be more effective in displaying the concept than one? (Consider combining a serif face with a sans serif face, for example.)
    • What size type will best convey the idea of the design? Is the size appropriate for the audience? Does it complement the other elements?
    • Is the type properly placed in the format to have the most impact on the reader? Are the shapes of the body copy pleasing or are they unattractive?
  • 12. Elements: Type
    • Consider the following when using type:
    • What type style will best communicate the feeling of your message? Does your typeface harmonize with or detract from your message?
    • Will two or more different type styles be more effective in displaying the concept than one? (Consider combining a serif face with a sans serif face, for example.)
    • What size type will best convey the idea of the design? Is the size appropriate for the audience? Does it complement the other elements?
    • Is the type properly placed in the format to have the most impact on the reader? Are the shapes of the body copy pleasing or are they unattractive?
    • Is the typeface one that needs to hold up will over a period of time, or is a more current typeface a better choice?
  • 13. Elements: Type
  • 14. Elements: Type
  • 15. Elements: Type
  • 16. Elements: Color Properties • Hue: The color name: Red, Green, Blue
  • 17. Elements: Color Properties • Hue: The color name: Red, Green, Blue • Color Value: The color range from light to dark White or black is added to the color to lighten or darken.
  • 18. Elements: Color Properties • Hue: The color name: Red, Green, Blue • Color Value: The color range from light to dark White or black is added to the color to lighten or darken. • Saturation (sometimes called Chroma): The intensity or vibrancy and purity of a color
  • 19.
    • • Additive or Transmitted Color:
    • The combination of pure screen colors of Red, Green, and Blue add up to white.
    Color: Categories
  • 20. Color: Categories
    • • Subtractive or Reflected Color:
    • The combination of pure print process colors of Cyan, Magenta, and Yellow subtract or absorb white and the other color rays yielding a color close to black.
    • The color is perceived when light rays of the other colors and white are absorbed by a surface that then reflects only the perceived color’s light rays.
  • 21. Design Principles Principles of Structure
  • 22. Principles of Structure: Balance
    • Equal distribution of weight dependent upon the interrelation of weight, position and arrangement of element(s) By making a mark on a paper, visual weight is established – the illusion of visual weight on a two-dimensional surface.
  • 23. Principles of Structure: Balance
    • Consider the following when striving for balance:
    • Which type of balance will be more appropriate for your concept? Does the idea call for symmetrical or asymmetrical balance?
  • 24. Principles of Structure: Balance
    • Consider the following when striving for balance:
    • Which type of balance will be more appropriate for your concept? Does the idea call for symmetrical or asymmetrical balance?
    • Does your design need a purposely unbalanced look? If so, have you pushed your design to feel obviously unbalanced?
  • 25. Principles of Structure: Balance
    • Consider the following when striving for balance:
    • Which type of balance will be more appropriate for your concept? Does the idea call for symmetrical or asymmetrical balance?
    • Does your design need a purposely unbalanced look? If so, have you pushed your design to feel obviously unbalanced?
    • What elements will you use to achieve balance? Will you balance elements that are similar to one another or elements that are different?
  • 26. Principles of Structure: Balance
    • Consider the following when striving for balance:
    • Which type of balance will be more appropriate for your concept? Does the idea call for symmetrical or asymmetrical balance?
    • Does your design need a purposely unbalanced look? If so, have you pushed your design to feel obviously unbalanced?
    • What elements will you use to achieve balance? Will you balance elements that are similar to one another or elements that are different?
    • What are the different moods you can create with the balance of your design? Have you used balance to its potential in your design? Is it contributing to your concept?
  • 27. Principles of Structure: Balance
    • Consider the following when striving for balance:
    • Which type of balance will be more appropriate for your concept? Does the idea call for symmetrical or asymmetrical balance?
    • Does your design need a purposely unbalanced look? If so, have you pushed your design to feel obviously unbalanced?
    • What elements will you use to achieve balance? Will you balance elements that are similar to one another or elements that are different?
    • What are the different moods you can create with the balance of your design? Have you used balance to its potential in your design? Is it contributing to your concept?
    • Have you let your concept dictate the needs of your design in terms of balance? (Be careful not to let your desire to achieve a certain look override the design.)
  • 28. Principles of Structure: Balance
    • Types of balance:
    • Symmetry—Symmetrical balance: The design is centered on all sides. Elements are seen as mirroring each other across an invisible vertical axis.
    • Asymmetry—Asymmetrical balance: Elements are distributed equally across the format. The elements of scale, color, value, and texture come into play when judging if the composition is balanced.
    • Tension: Unnatural placement of elements in the format and in relationship to each other.
  • 29. Principles of Structure: Balance
  • 30. Principles of Structure: Contrast
    • Consider the following when striving for contrast:
    • Do the contrasts you’ve chosen for your design strengthen its idea?
  • 31. Principles of Structure: Contrast
    • Consider the following when striving for contrast:
    • Do the contrasts you’ve chosen for your design strengthen its idea?
    • Have you fully considered all the ways you might achieve contrast? Do you want to use contrast in value or color? Shape? Texture? Typography?
  • 32. Principles of Structure: Contrast
    • Consider the following when striving for contrast:
    • Do the contrasts you’ve chosen for your design strengthen its idea?
    • Have you fully considered all the ways you might achieve contrast? Do you want to use contrast in value or color? Shape? Texture? Typography?
    • Are your choices of contrast in typography suitable to the message of the design? Does your use of type make the piece more or less readable for your audience? More or less visually appealing to your audience?
  • 33. Principles of Structure: Contrast
    • Consider the following when striving for contrast:
    • Do the contrasts you’ve chosen for your design strengthen its idea?
    • Have you fully considered all the ways you might achieve contrast? Do you want to use contrast in value or color? Shape? Texture? Typography?
    • Are your choices of contrast in typography suitable to the message of the design? Does your use of type make the piece more or less readable for your audience? More or less visually appealing to your audience?
    • Have you pushed contrast to its most potent level? That is, if you’re using large and small photographs or images, is there enough difference between the two sizes to show an obvious contrast?
  • 34. Principles of Structure: Contrast
    • Consider the following when striving for contrast:
    • Do the contrasts you’ve chosen for your design strengthen its idea?
    • Have you fully considered all the ways you might achieve contrast? Do you want to use contrast in value or color? Shape? Texture? Typography?
    • Are your choices of contrast in typography suitable to the message of the design? Does your use of type make the piece more or less readable for your audience? More or less visually appealing to your audience?
    • Have you pushed contrast to its most potent level? That is, if you’re using large and small photographs or images, is there enough difference between the two sizes to show an obvious contrast?
    • Have you considered the idea of diminished contrast? (Sometimes subtlety can add strength to a design: subtle color shifts, subtle differences in type, etc.)
  • 35. Principles of Structure: Contrast
  • 36. Principles of Structure: Unity
    • Consider the following when striving for unity:
    • Does the design call for a grid? (Most multi-page formats, like magazines, use a grid to create the since of cohesiveness between the pages.)
  • 37. Principles of Structure: Unity
    • Consider the following when striving for unity:
    • Does the design call for a grid? (Most multi-page formats, like magazines, use a grid to create the since of cohesiveness between the pages.)
    • How complex will your grid need to be? What elements will be consistently placed according to the grid lines?
  • 38. Principles of Structure: Unity
    • Consider the following when striving for unity:
    • Does the design call for a grid? (Most multi-page formats, like magazines, use a grid to create the since of cohesiveness between the pages.)
    • How complex will your grid need to be? What elements will be consistently placed according to the grid lines?
    • Where might it benefit the design to break the grid? When you look a pages where you’ve broken the grid, do they still seem connected to the pages where the grid is intact? (If not, consider whether you’ve been too free in breaking the grid?
  • 39. Principles of Structure: Unity
    • Consider the following when striving for unity:
    • Does the design call for a grid? (Most multi-page formats, like magazines, use a grid to create the since of cohesiveness between the pages.)
    • How complex will your grid need to be? What elements will be consistently placed according to the grid lines?
    • Where might it benefit the design to break the grid? When you look a pages where you’ve broken the grid, do they still seem connected to the pages where the grid is intact? (If not, consider whether you’ve been too free in breaking the grid?
    • Have you been able to obtain unity through the use of similar elements? Do your line, blocks of text copy and other elements on the page look as if they belong together in some way?
  • 40. Principles of Structure: Unity
    • Consider the following when striving for unity:
    • Does the design call for a grid? (Most multi-page formats, like magazines, use a grid to create the since of cohesiveness between the pages.)
    • How complex will your grid need to be? What elements will be consistently placed according to the grid lines?
    • Where might it benefit the design to break the grid? When you look a pages where you’ve broken the grid, do they still seem connected to the pages where the grid is intact? (If not, consider whether you’ve been too free in breaking the grid?
    • Have you been able to obtain unity through the use of similar elements? Do your line, blocks of text copy and other elements on the page look as if they belong together in some way?
    • Does your design lead the eye? Is there an obvious place in your design where the eye enters and then travels through the elements?
  • 41. Principles of Structure: Unity
    • Consider the following when striving for unity:
    • Does the design call for a grid? (Most multi-page formats, like magazines, use a grid to create the since of cohesiveness between the pages.)
    • How complex will your grid need to be? What elements will be consistently placed according to the grid lines?
    • Where might it benefit the design to break the grid? When you look a pages where you’ve broken the grid, do they still seem connected to the pages where the grid is intact? (If not, consider whether you’ve been too free in breaking the grid?
    • Have you been able to obtain unity through the use of similar elements? Do your line, blocks of text copy and other elements on the page look as if they belong together in some way?
    • Does your design lead the eye? Is there an obvious place in your design where the eye enters and then travels through the elements?
    • Have you eliminated any elements that distract the eye and pull it away from important parts of your design?
  • 42. Principles of Structure: Unity
  • 43. Gestalt Principles
  • 44. Gestalt Principles:
    • Similarity Similar elements are naturally grouped by the viewer
    • Proximity (also known as nearness)
    • Grouping by similarity in spatial location
    • Continuation
    • Occurs when the eye is carried smoothly into the line or curve of an adjoining object
    • Closure
    • Occurs when the eye completes a line or curve in order to form a familiar shape
    • Figure/Ground (also known as positive shape/negative space)
    • The eye discerns objects (figure) from the background (ground)—3 categories:
        • Stable figure/ground: Each 2-d shape is perceived in an unchanging relationship of object against background
        • Reversible Figure/Ground: Figure and ground can be focused on equally
        • Ambiguous Figure/Ground: On figure may be comprised of another or several other pictures.