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Future of Museums by Aarushi Agarwal and Vedika Dalmia

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Analyzing Trends Final Project, Fall 2013

Analyzing Trends Final Project, Fall 2013


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  • 1. VEDIKA AND AARUSHI
  • 2. Aarushi Agarwal and Vedika Dalmia TREND FORCE I COLLECTIONS AND CURATION
  • 3. Aarushi Agarwal and Vedika Dalmia DIGITIZING ARTIFACTS •  In the past, the creative activities were behind the walls of the museums and collection centers. Now you can browse through the entire collection sitting at home from you computer screens. •  This is because of an evolving trend of digitizing work, which allows museums and local artists to curate exhibitions online.
  • 4. Aarushi Agarwal and Vedika Dalmia DIGITIZING ARTIFACTS: SMITHSONIAN MUSEUM’S X 3D Handheld Laser Scanning the Cosmic Buddha to capture 3-D Data Image Source: Smithsonian Institution, undated A 3-D rendering of Abraham Lincoln’s life mask, held at the Smithsonian’s National Portrait Gallery. Image Source: Smithsonian Institution, undated The Smithsonian has launched a 3-D viewer online – Smithsonian X 3D- to give people a closer look at artifacts in their own homes.
  • 5. Aarushi Agarwal and Vedika Dalmia DIGITIZING ARTIFACTS: SMITHSONIAN MUSEUM’S X 3D Image Source: Smithsonian Institution, undated ‘The end of "do not touch": Use the Smithsonian X 3D Explorer to explore and manipulate museum objects like never before. Create and share your own scenes and print highly detailed replica of original Smithsonian collection pieces.’
  • 6. Aarushi Agarwal and Vedika Dalmia DIGITIZING ARTIFACTS: GOOGLE ART PROJECT An online platform where you can access high-resolution images of artworks, allowing users to explore art in a very new and different way. •  Renewed interest on the internet about art and culture. •  Over 300 partners in around 44 countries who actively contribute to the project •  Built-in Streetview Technology even allows viewers to take a virtual tour of the galleries. •  Not curating themselves; give the museums the technology, and let them choose what they want to put up online. Image Source: Google Art Project
  • 7. Aarushi Agarwal and Vedika Dalmia DIGITIZING ARTIFACTS: GOOGLE ART PROJECT Image Source: Google Art Project
  • 8. Aarushi Agarwal and Vedika Dalmia OTHER TECHNOLOGICAL TOOLS •  Digitizing is a small part of technology changing the face of museums. •  Technological advancements are playing a huge role in enhancing the experience of going to a museum. •  In addition to the digitization of artifacts, museums are even conceiving and developing other technological tools that will play into creating a multi-sensory museum experience.
  • 9. Aarushi Agarwal and Vedika Dalmia OTHER TECHNOLOGICAL TOOLS: BRAIN STIMULATION A newly published research suggests that brain stimulation can heighten aesthetic appreciation. The reason for the same lies in the fact that when activity in the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex is simulated - either internally or artificially – the viewer’s focus shifts from content to context. Image Source: Journal of Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience
  • 10. Aarushi Agarwal and Vedika Dalmia OTHER TECHNOLOGICAL TOOLS: SCOPIFY ROM (ROYAL ONTARIO MUSEUM) •  One of the upcoming trends is museums developing their own apps which allows you to access their collection from your smartphones. They have now taken it a step further by incorporating other tools to it. •  Using their smartphones, visitors would be able to “x-ray” things, “restore” ancient objects, and even put skin on skeleton. Image Source: Scopify.com http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lT3kW0GhJxc - t=52
  • 11. Aarushi Agarwal and Vedika Dalmia TREND THEME I: COLLECTION & CURATION OF ARTIFACTS Image Source: The Metropolitan Museum of Art •  A museum’s collection is its chief asset and these examples demonstrate how technology is increasingly becoming a part of how the collection is managed, recorded and being made accessible to people.
  • 12. Aarushi Agarwal and Vedika Dalmia COLLECTION & CURATION OF ARTIFACTS: PERSONALIZATION •  Museums in the near future will have to cultivate experiences that extend beyond the walls of the museum, both virtually and in terms of new types of physical spaces. •  Museums will have to deliver highly compelling, individually-curated experiences, where users, exhibits, light, sound and space interact to create a seamless environment. Source: Curating for individual experiences, WIRED Magazine
  • 13. Aarushi Agarwal and Vedika Dalmia COLLECTION & CURATION OF ARTIFACTS: 3-D PRINTING AND AUGMENTED REALITY Image(s) Source: design.nl by The New Institute Smart Replicas is a research project by Studio Maaike Roozenburg aiming to make fragile collection from museums more accessible by replicating pre-industrial objects and enhancing them with innovative technology.
  • 14. Aarushi Agarwal and Vedika Dalmia COLLECTION & CURATION OF ARTIFACTS: 3-D PRINTING AND AUGMENTED REALITY Image Source: WIRED Magazine In a future where digital is everywhere, overtaking the city's physical infrastructure, exhibits will be deliver immersive augmented reality experiences transforming traditional rooms at the Wallace Collection.
  • 15. Aarushi Agarwal and Vedika Dalmia TREND FORCE II COLLABORATION AND PATNERSHIPS
  • 16. Aarushi Agarwal and Vedika Dalmia COLLABORATION AND PARTNERSHIPS: TECH OPEN SOURCE •  Founded by the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation and hosted by the Tech Museum of Innovation. •  An open design platform where museums can post a request describing their needs for exhibits or programs, and a global network of designers and creative professionals can contribute their ideas and solutions. Image Source: The Tech Open Source
  • 17. Aarushi Agarwal and Vedika Dalmia COLLABORATION AND PARTNERSHIPS: OPEN EXHIBITS •  A National Science Foundation (NSF) sponsored initiative that looks to transform the way in which museums and other informal learning institutions produce and share computer-based exhibits. •  Focuses on the development of new human computer interaction (HCI) exhibits that holds the promise of creating visitor experiences that are physically engaging and socially interactive. Image Source: Open Exhibits
  • 18. Aarushi Agarwal and Vedika Dalmia COLLABORATION AND PARTNERSHIPS: MIAMI ART MUSEUMS ALLIANCE (MAMA) MAMA is comprised of seven South Florida Art Museums working together to leverage their collective efforts. It "sends a message to the art world, contradicting the notion that museums are constantly competing.” – Miami Today News Bass Museum of Art Pérez Art Museum Miami Wolfsonian FIU Museum of Contemporary Art North Miami Frost Art Museum of Florida International University Lowe Art Museum Vizcaya Museum and Gardens
  • 19. Aarushi Agarwal and Vedika Dalmia COLLABORATION AND PARTNERSHIPS: GROWING GALLERY COMMUNITY •  Galleries are sponsoring workshops and demos. They aim at building a community where people can buy and learn about art or even take lessons in making art. •  The Fredericksburg Good Art Company apart from having an online gallery provides art classes and workshops. For people its more than just visiting the museum and looking at the painting; they really want to understand art. Pérez Art Museum Miami Image Source: Good Art Company
  • 20. Aarushi Agarwal and Vedika Dalmia TREND THEME II: COLLABORATION AND PARTNERSHIPS These examples are a clear indication of Institutions becoming more networked in terms of creating a community of artists, visionaries and influencers that would help them to expand and build viewers. It focuses on how museums maximize and network their assets and how people learn about the collections. Image Source: Good Art Company
  • 21. Aarushi Agarwal and Vedika Dalmia TREND FORCE III MUSEUMS’ ROLE IN THE CITY
  • 22. Aarushi Agarwal and Vedika Dalmia MUSEUMS’ ROLE IN THE CITY: RETHINKING THE MANHATTAN GRID Image Source: The Architecural Leage Organized by the Architectural League in partnership with the MCNY
  • 23. Aarushi Agarwal and Vedika Dalmia MUSEUMS’ ROLE IN THE CITY: RETHINKING THE MANHATTAN GRID •  Issued a Call for Ideas inviting architects and urban designers from around the world to speculate about how Manhattan’s grid might be adapted, extended, or transformed in the future. Image Source: ArchLeague •  Issues to be considered included how the grid might be modified to respond to climate change or new transportation infrastructures; how new digital technologies might affect the form and function of the buildings in which we live and work and the impact they might have on the city’s streets and public spaces, etc.
  • 24. Aarushi Agarwal and Vedika Dalmia MUSEUMS’ ROLE IN THE CITY: MUSEUMS ASSOCIATION •  Museums Change Lives is the Museums Association’s vision for the increased social impact of museums. •  Every museum must play its part in improving lives, creating better places and helping to advance society, building on the traditional role of preserving collections and connecting audiences with them. Image Source: Museums Association
  • 25. Aarushi Agarwal and Vedika Dalmia TREND THEME III: MUSEUMS ROLE IN THE CITY Image Source: Sailor kissing the nurse by Kobra •  The museum is integrated in the heart of the city and not just a tourist destination anymore. It has a bigger role to play. •  Does art only happen inside the museum or is it everywhere.
  • 26. Aarushi Agarwal and Vedika Dalmia SUBCULTURE In this day and age art isn’t only restricted to the museum. Local artists are collaborating among themselves and curating their works outside the museum. Curation is no longer confined to the walls of the museum and just in the hands of the museum authorities.
  • 27. Aarushi Agarwal and Vedika Dalmia SUBCULTURE: CSA PHILADELPHIA •  The CSA program supports a direct maker-to-buyer relationship between artists and collectors working and living in the Philadelphia region. •  This program seeks to create dialog through a series of events revolved around local, innovative artwork. Image Source: CSA Art Philly
  • 28. Aarushi Agarwal and Vedika Dalmia THE MUSEUM OF MODERN ART (MoMA)
  • 29. Aarushi Agarwal and Vedika Dalmia CLIENT RECOMMENDATIONS New ways to tell stories; curate for individual experiences Personalization: content that can be adapted to the preferences of users in real time through distal interfaces driven by big data. What the audience wants to see (not what museums want their audience to see). Explore new approaches to display (and by whom) rather than focusing on originals. Look to other revenue streams, e.g. Rent out collections Technology to enhance physical experience Temporary or moveable museums to reach aCODES: wider audience INTERACTIVE, SENSORY, PERSONALIZED, ACCESSIBLE, COLLABORATIVE
  • 30. Aarushi Agarwal and Vedika Dalmia CONCLUSION Technology has as much connected as it has disconnected us with the museums’ exhibits. On one hand it has changed the way we interact with the museum but on the other, it has also created a barrier between the viewer and the artwork; in the process to capture every experience through a camera, audiences have forgotten how to enjoy the moment. Image Source: Global Moxie The hope is that it in the future, museums can both foster increased engagement of their audience as well as gather better data about what people like to see and how, while ensuring controlled use of technological devices so that it does not disconnect the visitor from the art on display.
  • 31. Aarushi Agarwal and Vedika Dalmia