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Enterprise Web 2.0 Antipatterns
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Enterprise Web 2.0 Antipatterns

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In software engineering, an anti-pattern is a design pattern that appears to be a good idea but is ineffective or far from optimal in practice, taking you from a problem to a bad solution. Some ...

In software engineering, an anti-pattern is a design pattern that appears to be a good idea but is ineffective or far from optimal in practice, taking you from a problem to a bad solution. Some educators claim that we learn more from errors than from successes, hence the value of identifying anti-patterns.

The powerful combination of buzz and herd behavior has led companies in traditional industries to invest in blogs, wikis, social networking and other Web 2.0 tools and services, to foster collaboration and knowledge sharing and to reach out to clients and business partners. However, for many of them results have been lukewarm at best.

This session will explore some of the common anti-patterns he observed in global enterprises that may explain why some of the benefits of Web 2.0 are not materializing fast enough, and will provide recommendations on how your organization can avoid common pitfalls.

Update: This blog post explains what I mean by "the joke, the circus, and the soap-opera":
http://aaronkim.wordpress.com/2009/12/14/the-joke-the-circus-and-the-soap-opera/

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  • awesome presentation..thanks for making it so beautiful
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  • Superb presentation ! Enlightening to say the least. To the point, and somewhat provocative and perfect tone.

    Jean-François Nadeau, M. Sc.
    ex-IBMer (IBM Canada)
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Enterprise Web 2.0 Antipatterns Enterprise Web 2.0 Antipatterns Presentation Transcript

  • Enterprise Web 2.0 Anti-Patterns technology • business • people Aaron Kim Senior Managing Consultant, Emerging Technologies Evangelist - IBM Canada © 2009 IBM Corporation Photo by Flickr user and IBMer shawdm, 1 Not for further distribution used with author permission Thursday, May 28, 2009 1
  • About Me • Senior Managing Consultant, Emerging Technologies & Web 2.0 Evangelist with IBM Global Business Services – Application Services • 17 years of experience in IT Services • 3 years as a Basel II consultant Aaron Kim akim@ca.ibm.com • Biology degree from Universidade de São Paulo (Brazil) • MBA from University of Toronto • Co-chairs the Web 2.0 for Business IBM Community • Web 2.0 Consulting services to IBM clients and client teams from Canada, France, US, UK, Singapore, South Africa, Spain, Switzerland and Turkey • Web 2.0 & Social Computing speaker at several conferences in Canada and the US Thursday, May 28, 2009 2
  • About Me Aaron Kim akim@ca.ibm.com Tag cloud generated by Wordle, a masterpiece app by IBMer Jonathan Feinberg Thursday, May 28, 2009 3 View slide
  • In software engineering, an anti-pattern is a design pattern that appears obvious but is ineffective or far from optimal in practice. It’s a pattern that tells you how to go from a problem to a bad solution. It’s something that looks like a good idea, but which backfires badly when applied. Sources: Wikipedia (as of 12/Sep/2008) http://c2.com/cgi/wiki?AntiPattern Thursday, May 28, 2009 4 View slide
  • Antipattern: <pattern name> Why the bad solution looks attractive • It becomes a pattern because somehow it looks like the right thing to do Why it turns out to be bad • Common pitfalls What positive patterns are applicable instead • Best (Good?) Practices Thursday, May 28, 2009 5
  • Antipattern: Fear 2.0 Photo by Flickr user Violator3, licensed under Creative Commons, Attribution 2.0 Generic Thursday, May 28, 2009 6
  • • Fear is not a bad thing, but action paralysis is • Failure comes with a name tag • Innovating is risky, not innovating may be riskier • Full control is no longer in your hands • Fail often, fail quickly, fail gracefully and learn from it * Antipattern: Fear 2.0 * Partially based on a presentation by Mike Moran Thursday, May 28, 2009 7
  • Antipattern: Hype 2.0 Thursday, May 28, 2009 8
  • • “I want it because it’s cool” • “I want it because Gartner | Forrester | McKinsey | IBM | the CIO magazine | my boss | my friend told me I need it” • The lack of a business case will come back to haunt you Antipattern: Hype 2.0 Thursday, May 28, 2009 9
  • Photo: Leopard EM Antipattern: New World, Old Habits Thursday, May 28, 2009 10
  • Photo by Flickr user dcjohn, licensed under Creative Commons, Attribution 2.0 Generic Antipattern: New World, Old Habits Thursday, May 28, 2009 11
  • Photo: StockExchange Antipattern: New World, Old Habits Thursday, May 28, 2009 12
  • People as your competitive advantage Frequent e-mails Infrequent e-mails Web 2.0 Collaboration You Jim Susan Chris Mary Roberto Friends Jim’s manager Your manager Co-Workers Helen John Other employees in your company Akira Your business partners Peter Your clients Thursday, May 28, 2009 13
  • • “It’s just like phone and email” • A fool with a tool is still a fool • “Web 2.0 is an attitude, not a technology” (Ian Davis) • It’s about culture transformation, not a toolset • “Ultimately, taking full advantage of Web 2.0 may require Management 2.0” (Business Week, June 5, 2006) Antipattern: New World, Old Habits Thursday, May 28, 2009 14
  • Antipattern: Build it, and they will come Photo by Flickr user Sister72, licensed under Creative Commons, Attribution 2.0 Generic Thursday, May 28, 2009 15
  • Antipattern: Build it, and they will come • “If Wikipedia works, my wiki will too” • People have limited bandwidth 2.0 • The joke, the circus and the soap-opera • Clay Shirky’s plausible promise, effective tool and acceptable bargain (HCE) • User Adoption Plan + Balanced Incentives Thursday, May 28, 2009 16
  • Motivations and Rewards Maslow’s Pyramid of Needs 2.0 Accomplishment: pursuit of personal satisfaction Wikis, Ratings Esteem: pursuit of consideration, prestige Blogs, Twitter, User Reviews Socialization: pursuit of love and belonging Instant Messaging, Facebook, MySpace Security: pursuit of moral and physical protection Anti-virus, Firewalls, Authentication Survival: pursuit of basic needs Google, Web Mail, Skype Source: C’est la maturité, stupide! Maslow s’invite à la table du 2.0 http://mediapedia.wordpress.com/2006/07/30/c%E2%80%99est-la-maturite-stupide-maslow-s%E2%80%99invite-a-la-table-du-20/ Thursday, May 28, 2009 17
  • Photo by Flickr user pipeapple, licensed under Creative Commons, Attribution 2.0 Generic Antipattern: Geekness 2.0 Thursday, May 28, 2009 18
  • • “For it to work, you just need to use Firefox, download and install Greasemonkey, edit a Userscript and install it. Anybody can do it.” • Second law of thermodynamics: Energy and Entropy • Laziness 2.0 • Nudge and KISS Antipattern: Geekness 2.0 Thursday, May 28, 2009 19
  • Photo by Flickr user aturkus, licensed under Creative Commons, Attribution 2.0 Generic Antipattern: Best of Breed Thursday, May 28, 2009 20
  • • “Proven solutions”, but in isolation • Golden hammer • To a worm in horseradish, the whole world is horseradish (Word vs Excel) • Integration becomes a nightmare • Adopt an integrated solution that: ✓ meets your core needs from the outset ✓ can be augmented by adding best of breed ✓ has enterprise grade support Antipattern: Best of Breed Thursday, May 28, 2009 21
  • Integration as your competitive advantage • Processes • Products • Services Photo by Flickr user TimWilson, licensed under Creative Commons, Attribution 2.0 Generic Thursday, May 28, 2009 22
  • Photo: Wikimedia Commons, Public Domain Antipattern: Search, and thou should not find Thursday, May 28, 2009 23
  • • Your users embraced Web 2.0 and are creating plenty of content • Most of it is likely to be, err, not very good • Information overload will quickly overwhelm your users • UGC needs to be indexed by the main search facility • Not all UGC is created equal, so make the good float to the top Antipattern: Search, and thou should not find Thursday, May 28, 2009 24
  • Data as your competitive advantage ‣ Data discovery Text search is just the beginning ‣ Data visualization Make it easily consummable ‣ Data filtering Make the good float to the top ‣ Data augmentation Information provenance and correlation ‣ Data sharing Allow others to mix and match ‣ Data integration Make difficult for others to copy you Photo by Flickr user KentBye, licensed under Creative Commons, Attribution 2.0 Generic Thursday, May 28, 2009 25
  • Photo by Flickr user Memotions, licensed under Creative Commons, Attribution 2.0 Generic Antipattern: Intangible means unmeasurable Thursday, May 28, 2009 26
  • • “Nobody asks what’s the ROI for phone and email” • Business value must discount costs • Value creation vs. value capture • Easy to understand business case • Easy to calculate ROI models Antipattern: Intangible means unmeasurable Thursday, May 28, 2009 27
  • Antipattern: Measuring supply, not demand Photo by Flickr user Memotions, licensed under Creative Commons, Attribution 2.0 Generic Thursday, May 28, 2009 28
  • Antipattern: Measuring supply, not demand • Number of bloggers, posts, wiki spaces, wiki authors are measures of supply • Not all UGC has business value • Not all UGC has business value proportional to its volume • Find which demand metrics can be associated to business value Thursday, May 28, 2009 29
  • Closing Thoughts Thursday, May 28, 2009 30
  • Control in Social Media is like grabbing water: the stronger you grab, the less you hold. There's a right way to retain water, but not by being forceful. Pauline Ores, IBM Thursday, May 28, 2009 31
  • In the Social Media world, the most powerful person is the one who shares the most. Pauline Ores, IBM Thursday, May 28, 2009 32
  • In a socially connected world, you only know what you share. Aaron Kim, IBM Thursday, May 28, 2009 33
  • Thank You Twitter: @aaronjuliuskim Thursday, May 28, 2009 34