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Vital Records

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Genealogy Boot Camp Session 3

Genealogy Boot Camp Session 3

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  • Use the Handybook for Genealogists , Ancestry’s Red Book or vitalrec.com to research what records are available for the county you are researching.
  • Use the Handybook for Genealogists , Ancestry’s Red Book or vitalrec.com to research what records are available for the county you are researching. Also try county web site.
  • Use the Handybook for Genealogists , Ancestry’s Red Book or vitalrec.com to research what records are available for the county you are researching.
  • Use the Handybook for Genealogists , Ancestry’s Red Book or vitalrec.com to research what records are available for the county you are researching.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Vital Records Birth, Death & Marriage Records
    • 2. What are Vital Records?
      • Civil record of a birth, death, or marriage kept by the county, state, or town in which the event occurred.
    • 3. Common Misconceptions about Vital Records in the U.S.
      • #1 They are kept by the federal government.
      • In the United States, each state has developed its own system of vital registration.
    • 4. Common Misconceptions about Vital Records in the US
      • #2 Vital records are the same in every state and have not changed much over the years.
      • Each jurisdiction determines what information is collected.
    • 5. Common Misconceptions about Vital Records in the US
      • #3 The states have always mandated vital record registration.
      • Each state adopted vital record registration in their own time.
      • Most states have limited birth and death records before the late 1800s.
    • 6. Common Misconceptions about Vital Records in the US
      • #4 All vital records are open to the public.
      • While many vital records are available to the public, each state or jurisdiction determines the conditions of access. For example:
      • Public access to vital records in Illinois:
      • Birth certificates that are 75 years or older
      • Marriage certificates that are 50 years or older
      • Death certificates that are 20 years or older
    • 7. Common Misconceptions about Vital Records in the US
      • #4 Vital records are all online.
      • While it is true that some states and some counties offer digitized copies of some vital records, it is still only a very small (but growing) percent.
    • 8. Common Misconceptions about Vital Records in the US
      • #5 They are usually free.
      • Obtaining vital records is generally not free. The cost varies widely from state to state.
    • 9. A Closer Look at Vital Records
    • 10. What Information Might I Find on a Death Certificate?
      • Information about the deceased
        • (i.e. date and place of death, cause of death, age, date and place of burial, date and place of birth, occupation, place of residence, marital status, military service
      • Information about the spouse
        • (i.e. maiden name)
      • Information about the parents
        • (i.e. father’s name and birthplace, mother’s name and birthplace, mother's maiden name)
      • Information about siblings or other relatives
        • (i.e. sibling may be listed as the informant. May learn married names and places of residence.)
      • Name of the funeral director
    • 11. 1888 Cook County Death Certificate
    • 12. 1911 Chicago Death Certificate
    • 13. 1926 Chicago Death Certificate
    • 14. 1972 Death Certificate Indiana
    • 15. What Information Might I Find on A Birth Certificate?
      • Information about the child
        • (i.e name of child, date of birth, place of birth, sex of child)
      • Information about the father
        • (i.e. age or date of birth, birthplace, occupation, and residence)
      • Information about the mother
        • (i.e. maiden name, age or date of birth, birthplace, occupation, and residence)
      • Information about possible siblings
        • number of children born to the mother, and the number living at the time of the birth being recorded.
    • 16. 1884 Chicago Birth Certificate
    • 17. 1886 New York Birth Certificate
    • 18. 1904 New Jersey Birth Certificate
    • 19. 1911 Chicago Birth Certificate
    • 20. 1913 Chicago Birth Certificate
    • 21. 1917 Chicago Birth Certificate
    • 22. What Might I Learn from Marriage Records?
      • Date of the marriage.
      • Place of the marriage
      • Names of Witnesses.
      • Who performed the ceremony.
      • Information about the Bride
        • (i.e. maiden name, age, birth date, birthplace, occupation, and address)
      • Information about the groom
        • (i.e. age, birth date, birthplace, occupation, and address)
      • Information about the parents of the bride and groom
        • (i.e. father’s name and birthplace, and mother’s maiden name and birthplace.)
    • 23. 1872 Chicago Marriage Record
    • 24. Corresponding 1872 Church Marriage Record
    • 25. 1903 Chicago Marriage Record
    • 26. 1910 Chicago Marriage Record
    • 27. 1910 New Jersey Marriage Record
    • 28. In Class Activity Analyze a Death Certificate
    • 29. Finding & Accessing Vital Records
    • 30. Where Can I Find Vital Records?
      • County Clerk's Offices
      • Town Offices (New York and New England)
      • State Health Departments
      • State Archives
      • LDS Family History Library
    • 31. How Do I Request a Vital Record?
      • Step One: Make sure you know the date, location and name associated with the document.
    • 32. How Do I Request a Vital Record?
      • Step Two: Determine the availability of records for the area and time you are researching.
    • 33. How Do I Request a Vital Record?
      • Step Three: Determine the repository that maintains the records. Beware of county boundary changes.
    • 34. How Do I Request a Vital Record?
      • Step Four: Submit your request as directed by the repository. Special forms or self-addressed stamped envelope (SASE) may be required. Payment is usually required in advance.
    • 35. Where can I find death dates and locations?
      • Obituaries
      • Published or Online Death Indexes
      • Social Security Death Index (Since 1962)
      • Gravestones
      • Probate Records
      • Church Records
      • Pension Records
      • Funeral Homes
    • 36. Where can I find birth dates and locations?
      • Published or Online Birth Indexes
      • Family Bible
      • Social Security Card Applications (SS-5)
      • Church Records
      • Baptismal Records
      • Death Certificates
      • Social Security Death Index
      • Obituaries
      • Gravestones
      • 1900 Census (Month and Year)
    • 37. Where can I find marriage dates and locations?
      • Published or Online Marriage Indexes
      • Obituaries
      • Church Records
      • Pension Records
      • 1900, 1910, 1930 Census (Approx. year)
      • Newspaper articles
    • 38. Vital Record Indexes Can Help
      • Indexes allow you to search records by name. Indexes may be in book format, on microfilm, or online.
        • Check web sites of state and local archives, genealogical societies and libraries.
    • 39. Illinois Statewide Death Index Pre-1916
    • 40. Local Library
    • 41. McHenry County Illinois Genealogical Society
    • 42. Vital Record Indexes Can Help
      • Indexes allow you to search records by name. Indexes may be in book format, on microfilm, or online.
        • Check web sites of state and local archives, genealogical societies and libraries.
        • Check resources available at www.familysearch.org
    • 43.  
    • 44.  
    • 45. Vital Record Indexes Can Help
      • Indexes allow you to search records by name. Indexes may be in book format, on microfilm, or online.
        • Check web sites of state and local archives, genealogical societies and libraries.
        • Check resources available at www.familysearch.org
        • Browse Ancestry LE for Vital Record Indexes.
    • 46.  
    • 47. Vital Record Indexes Can Help
      • Indexes allow you to search records by name. Indexes may be in book format, on microfilm, or online.
        • Check web sites of state and local archives, genealogical societies and libraries.
        • Check resources available at www.familysearch.org
        • Browse Ancestry LE for Vital Record Indexes.
        • Browse portal sites such as Cyndi’s List and US Genweb for links to online indexes.
    • 48.  
    • 49. Vital Record Indexes Can Help
      • Indexes allow you to search records by name. Indexes may be in book format, on microfilm, or online.
        • Check web sites of state and local archives, genealogical societies and libraries.
        • Check resources available at www.familysearch.org
        • Browse Ancestry LE for Vital Record Indexes.
        • Browse portal sites such as Cyndi’s List and US Genweb for links to online indexes.
        • Use the Social Security Death Index.
    • 50. Social Security Death Index
      • ssdi.rootsweb.ancestry.com
      • An index of deceased persons possessing social security numbers and whose deaths were reported to the SSA.
      • Only includes deaths since around 1962.
      • Contains over 83 million records.
    • 51.  
    • 52. Use the SSDI to identify dates and possible locations of deaths.
    • 53. 1966 Death Certificate for William Harrison Holton
    • 54. Where Can I Find More Information?
      • Books
      • Ancestry's Red Book: American State, County & Town Sources
      • The Source : A Guidebook to American Genealogy
      • Bentley, Elizabeth Petty. County Courthouse Book
      • Greenwood, Val D. The Researcher's Guide to American Genealogy
      • Hansen, Holly. Handybook for Genealogists: United States of America
      • Kemp, Thomas Jay. International Vital Records Handbook
      • Web Sites
      • www.vitalrec.com ( Do NOT use the search boxes !)
      • www.familysearch.org (Library Catalog, Historical Records, Learn Wiki)
      • www.deathindexes.com
      • http://usgenweb.org/
      • http://publications.newberry.org/ahcbp/ (Historical Boundaries)

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