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  • Use the Handybook for Genealogists , Ancestry’s Red Book or vitalrec.com to research what records are available for the county you are researching.
  • Use the Handybook for Genealogists , Ancestry’s Red Book or vitalrec.com to research what records are available for the county you are researching. Also try county web site.
  • Use the Handybook for Genealogists , Ancestry’s Red Book or vitalrec.com to research what records are available for the county you are researching.
  • Use the Handybook for Genealogists , Ancestry’s Red Book or vitalrec.com to research what records are available for the county you are researching.

Transcript

  • 1. Vital Records Birth, Death & Marriage Records
  • 2. What are Vital Records?
    • Civil record of a birth, death, or marriage kept by the county, state, or town in which the event occurred.
  • 3. Common Misconceptions about Vital Records in the U.S.
    • #1 They are kept by the federal government.
    • In the United States, each state has developed its own system of vital registration.
  • 4. Common Misconceptions about Vital Records in the US
    • #2 Vital records are the same in every state and have not changed much over the years.
    • Each jurisdiction determines what information is collected.
  • 5. Common Misconceptions about Vital Records in the US
    • #3 The states have always mandated vital record registration.
    • Each state adopted vital record registration in their own time.
    • Most states have limited birth and death records before the late 1800s.
  • 6. Common Misconceptions about Vital Records in the US
    • #4 All vital records are open to the public.
    • While many vital records are available to the public, each state or jurisdiction determines the conditions of access. For example:
    • Public access to vital records in Illinois:
    • Birth certificates that are 75 years or older
    • Marriage certificates that are 50 years or older
    • Death certificates that are 20 years or older
  • 7. Common Misconceptions about Vital Records in the US
    • #4 Vital records are all online.
    • While it is true that some states and some counties offer digitized copies of some vital records, it is still only a very small (but growing) percent.
  • 8. Common Misconceptions about Vital Records in the US
    • #5 They are usually free.
    • Obtaining vital records is generally not free. The cost varies widely from state to state.
  • 9. A Closer Look at Vital Records
  • 10. What Information Might I Find on a Death Certificate?
    • Information about the deceased
      • (i.e. date and place of death, cause of death, age, date and place of burial, date and place of birth, occupation, place of residence, marital status, military service
    • Information about the spouse
      • (i.e. maiden name)
    • Information about the parents
      • (i.e. father’s name and birthplace, mother’s name and birthplace, mother's maiden name)
    • Information about siblings or other relatives
      • (i.e. sibling may be listed as the informant. May learn married names and places of residence.)
    • Name of the funeral director
  • 11. 1888 Cook County Death Certificate
  • 12. 1911 Chicago Death Certificate
  • 13. 1926 Chicago Death Certificate
  • 14. 1972 Death Certificate Indiana
  • 15. What Information Might I Find on A Birth Certificate?
    • Information about the child
      • (i.e name of child, date of birth, place of birth, sex of child)
    • Information about the father
      • (i.e. age or date of birth, birthplace, occupation, and residence)
    • Information about the mother
      • (i.e. maiden name, age or date of birth, birthplace, occupation, and residence)
    • Information about possible siblings
      • number of children born to the mother, and the number living at the time of the birth being recorded.
  • 16. 1884 Chicago Birth Certificate
  • 17. 1886 New York Birth Certificate
  • 18. 1904 New Jersey Birth Certificate
  • 19. 1911 Chicago Birth Certificate
  • 20. 1913 Chicago Birth Certificate
  • 21. 1917 Chicago Birth Certificate
  • 22. What Might I Learn from Marriage Records?
    • Date of the marriage.
    • Place of the marriage
    • Names of Witnesses.
    • Who performed the ceremony.
    • Information about the Bride
      • (i.e. maiden name, age, birth date, birthplace, occupation, and address)
    • Information about the groom
      • (i.e. age, birth date, birthplace, occupation, and address)
    • Information about the parents of the bride and groom
      • (i.e. father’s name and birthplace, and mother’s maiden name and birthplace.)
  • 23. 1872 Chicago Marriage Record
  • 24. Corresponding 1872 Church Marriage Record
  • 25. 1903 Chicago Marriage Record
  • 26. 1910 Chicago Marriage Record
  • 27. 1910 New Jersey Marriage Record
  • 28. In Class Activity Analyze a Death Certificate
  • 29. Finding & Accessing Vital Records
  • 30. Where Can I Find Vital Records?
    • County Clerk's Offices
    • Town Offices (New York and New England)
    • State Health Departments
    • State Archives
    • LDS Family History Library
  • 31. How Do I Request a Vital Record?
    • Step One: Make sure you know the date, location and name associated with the document.
  • 32. How Do I Request a Vital Record?
    • Step Two: Determine the availability of records for the area and time you are researching.
  • 33. How Do I Request a Vital Record?
    • Step Three: Determine the repository that maintains the records. Beware of county boundary changes.
  • 34. How Do I Request a Vital Record?
    • Step Four: Submit your request as directed by the repository. Special forms or self-addressed stamped envelope (SASE) may be required. Payment is usually required in advance.
  • 35. Where can I find death dates and locations?
    • Obituaries
    • Published or Online Death Indexes
    • Social Security Death Index (Since 1962)
    • Gravestones
    • Probate Records
    • Church Records
    • Pension Records
    • Funeral Homes
  • 36. Where can I find birth dates and locations?
    • Published or Online Birth Indexes
    • Family Bible
    • Social Security Card Applications (SS-5)
    • Church Records
    • Baptismal Records
    • Death Certificates
    • Social Security Death Index
    • Obituaries
    • Gravestones
    • 1900 Census (Month and Year)
  • 37. Where can I find marriage dates and locations?
    • Published or Online Marriage Indexes
    • Obituaries
    • Church Records
    • Pension Records
    • 1900, 1910, 1930 Census (Approx. year)
    • Newspaper articles
  • 38. Vital Record Indexes Can Help
    • Indexes allow you to search records by name. Indexes may be in book format, on microfilm, or online.
      • Check web sites of state and local archives, genealogical societies and libraries.
  • 39. Illinois Statewide Death Index Pre-1916
  • 40. Local Library
  • 41. McHenry County Illinois Genealogical Society
  • 42. Vital Record Indexes Can Help
    • Indexes allow you to search records by name. Indexes may be in book format, on microfilm, or online.
      • Check web sites of state and local archives, genealogical societies and libraries.
      • Check resources available at www.familysearch.org
  • 43.  
  • 44.  
  • 45. Vital Record Indexes Can Help
    • Indexes allow you to search records by name. Indexes may be in book format, on microfilm, or online.
      • Check web sites of state and local archives, genealogical societies and libraries.
      • Check resources available at www.familysearch.org
      • Browse Ancestry LE for Vital Record Indexes.
  • 46.  
  • 47. Vital Record Indexes Can Help
    • Indexes allow you to search records by name. Indexes may be in book format, on microfilm, or online.
      • Check web sites of state and local archives, genealogical societies and libraries.
      • Check resources available at www.familysearch.org
      • Browse Ancestry LE for Vital Record Indexes.
      • Browse portal sites such as Cyndi’s List and US Genweb for links to online indexes.
  • 48.  
  • 49. Vital Record Indexes Can Help
    • Indexes allow you to search records by name. Indexes may be in book format, on microfilm, or online.
      • Check web sites of state and local archives, genealogical societies and libraries.
      • Check resources available at www.familysearch.org
      • Browse Ancestry LE for Vital Record Indexes.
      • Browse portal sites such as Cyndi’s List and US Genweb for links to online indexes.
      • Use the Social Security Death Index.
  • 50. Social Security Death Index
    • ssdi.rootsweb.ancestry.com
    • An index of deceased persons possessing social security numbers and whose deaths were reported to the SSA.
    • Only includes deaths since around 1962.
    • Contains over 83 million records.
  • 51.  
  • 52. Use the SSDI to identify dates and possible locations of deaths.
  • 53. 1966 Death Certificate for William Harrison Holton
  • 54. Where Can I Find More Information?
    • Books
    • Ancestry's Red Book: American State, County & Town Sources
    • The Source : A Guidebook to American Genealogy
    • Bentley, Elizabeth Petty. County Courthouse Book
    • Greenwood, Val D. The Researcher's Guide to American Genealogy
    • Hansen, Holly. Handybook for Genealogists: United States of America
    • Kemp, Thomas Jay. International Vital Records Handbook
    • Web Sites
    • www.vitalrec.com ( Do NOT use the search boxes !)
    • www.familysearch.org (Library Catalog, Historical Records, Learn Wiki)
    • www.deathindexes.com
    • http://usgenweb.org/
    • http://publications.newberry.org/ahcbp/ (Historical Boundaries)