Sentence structure
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Sentence structure

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Sentence structure Sentence structure Presentation Transcript

  • Sentence Types
  • Sentence Types Simple Compound Complex Compound Complex
  • SUBJECT PREDICATE Mary plays tennis.
  • SUBJECT PREDICATE Mary plays tennis. one subject one predicate
  • Tom and Mary Compound Subject play tennis.
  • Tom and Mary play tennis and swim. Compound Subject Compound Predicate
  • Tom and Mary play tennis.
  • Tom and Mary play tennis and swim.
  • Tom and Mary play tennis and swim. No comma before “and” in compound subjects and predicates!
  • SUBJECT PREDICATE and SUBJECT PREDICATE
  • Tom swims, and Mary plays tennis.
  • FOR AND NOR BUT OR YET SO
  • Tom swims, and Mary plays tennis. Clause 1 Independent Clause 2 Independent
  • Tom swims, and Mary plays tennis. Comma before “and” in compound sentences!
  • MOREOVER HOWEVER OTHERWISE THEREFORE
  • Bob is handsome; moreover, he is rich. Clause 1 Independent Clause 2 Independent
  • Bob is handsome; moreover, he is rich. Note: Semicolon before conjunctive adverb and comma after conjunctive adverb!
  • Conjunctive Adverbs “float” Conjunctive adverbs are sometimes called “floating” adverbs because they can be positioned at the beginning, in the middle, or at the end of a clause.
  • Bob is handsome; moreover, he is rich.
  • Bob is handsome; he is, moreover, rich.
  • Bob is handsome; he is, moreover, rich. Note: Place commas before and after a conjunctive adverb in the middle!
  • Bob is handsome; he is rich, moreover.
  • Bob is handsome; he is rich, moreover. Note: Place a comma before a conjunctive adverb at the end!
  • Semicolons “If the relation between the ideas expressed in the main clauses is very close and obvious without a conjunction, you can separate the clauses with a semicolon” (Little, Brown Handbook, 9th Edition, p. 361).
  • Matt has benefited from his exercise program; he is slim and energetic.
  • SUBJECT PREDICATE even though SUBJECT PREDICATE
  • Bob is popular even though he is ugly.
  • EVEN THOUGH WHEN ADVERB CLAUSES BECAUSE UNLESS WHEREAS
  • Bob is popular even though he is ugly. Clause 1 Clause 2 Independent Dependent
  • Even though Bob is ugly, he is popular. Clause 1 Dependent Clause 2 Independent
  • Bob is popular even though he is ugly. When the MAIN clause is first, it is usually NOT followed by a comma!
  • Even though Bob is ugly, he is popular. When the ADVERB clause is first, it is followed by a comma!
  • Mike is popular because he is good looking, but he is not very happy.
  • Mike is popular because he is good looking, but he is not very happy. Punctuate each clause according to its rules!
  • SIMPLE SENTENCE My friends and I play tennis and go bowling every weekend. No commas before “and” in compound subjects and predicates!
  • COMPOUND SENTENCE: Coordinating Conjunction Men may exercise harder, but they may not exercise as regularly as women do. Comma before coordinating conjunction!
  • COMPOUND SENTENCE: Conjunctive Adverb Native and nonnative English speakers have different needs; however, some schools fail to distinguish between these groups. Semicolon before conjunctive adverb Comma after conjunctive adverb!
  • COMPOUND SENTENCE: Conjunctive Adverb--in the middle Native and nonnative English speakers have different needs; some schools, however, fail to distinguish between these groups. Semicolon after first independent clause-Commas before and after conjunctive adverb!
  • COMPOUND SENTENCE: Conjunctive Adverb at the end Native and nonnative English speakers have different needs; some schools fail to distinguish between these groups, however. Semicolon after first independent clause-Comma before conjunctive adverb!
  • COMPLEX SENTENCE: Adverb Clauses--Subordinating Conjunction People had continuous moderate exercise when they had to hunt for food. When main clause is first, it is not usually followed by a comma!
  • COMPLEX SENTENCE: Adverb Clauses--Subordinating Conjunction When people had to hunt for food, they had continuous moderate exercise. When the adverb clause is first, it is followed by a comma!
  • Writing Academic English, Second Edition, by Alice Oshima and Ann Hogue. White Plains: Addison, Wesley, Longman, 1999. The Little, Brown Handbook, by H. Ramsey Fowler and Jane E. Aaron, Pearson, 2004.