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Creating a Content Strategy Ecosystem

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Andrea Ames at the Oct 2014 LavaCon preconference workshop. …

Andrea Ames at the Oct 2014 LavaCon preconference workshop.
Workshop templates:
- analysis: http://www.slideshare.net/aames/02analysis-template
- requirements: http://www.slideshare.net/aames/03requirements-template
- metrics: http://www.slideshare.net/aames/04metrics-template
- stakeholder expectations: http://www.slideshare.net/aames/communication-plan-template-for-lavacon-creating-a-content-strategy-ecosystem-workshop
- biz case: http://www.slideshare.net/aames/05business-case-template

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  • Only 10% of total mass above water; 90% underwater is what ocean currents act on and what creates the iceberg’s behavior in the 10%
    Just below the water line, start to see patterns or recurrence of events, which indicate that an event is not an isolated incident
    Deep beneath the patterns are the root causes that create or drive the patterns
    At the base of the iceberg are assumptions and worldviews that created or sustained the structures that are in place
    In solving problems, the greatest leverage is in changing the structure--applying deep ocean currents to move the iceberg, which will change the events at its tip
  • “[T]he leading edge of the economy in developed countries has become driven by technologies based on knowledge and information production and dissemination. … We define the knowledge economy as production and services based on knowledge-intensive activities that contribute to an accelerated pace of technological and scientific advance as well as equally rapid obsolescence. The key components of a knowledge economy include a greater reliance on intellectual capabilities than on physical inputs or natural resources, combined with efforts to integrate improvements in every stage of the production process, from the R&D lab to the factory floor to the interface with customers.” From The Knowledge Economy, Walter W. Powell and Kaisa Snellman, Stanford University, 2004. http://www.stanford.edu/group/song/papers/powell_snellman.pdf
  • “[T]he leading edge of the economy in developed countries has become driven by technologies based on knowledge and information production and dissemination. … We define the knowledge economy as production and services based on knowledge-intensive activities that contribute to an accelerated pace of technological and scientific advance as well as equally rapid obsolescence. The key components of a knowledge economy include a greater reliance on intellectual capabilities than on physical inputs or natural resources, combined with efforts to integrate improvements in every stage of the production process, from the R&D lab to the factory floor to the interface with customers.” From The Knowledge Economy, Walter W. Powell and Kaisa Snellman, Stanford University, 2004. http://www.stanford.edu/group/song/papers/powell_snellman.pdf
  • http://www.klipfolio.com/resources/kpi-examples
  • http://www.klipfolio.com/resources/kpi-examples
  • http://www.klipfolio.com/resources/kpi-examples
  • Transcript

    • 1. IBM Client Technical Content Experience (CTCX) Creating a Content Strategy Ecosystem Andrea L. Ames (@aames) IBM Senior Technical Staff Member IBM Enterprise Content Experience Strategist/Architect/Designer 12 October 2014 © IBM Corporation 2014. All Rights Reserved. @aames #LavaCon
    • 2. IBM Enterprise Content Strategy & Content Experience 2 @aames #LavaCon Acknowledging Alyson Riley, my former IBM content strategy cohort in crime The original version of this workshop and its content was a labor of love in 2013 Co-created by me and Alyson Co-taught by me and Alyson twice Alyson designed the chart template and most of the graphical charts Although Alyson has moved on from IBM to The Mayo Clinic, she is clearly with us in sprit through this material  All material is used with her knowledge and consent
    • 3. IBM Enterprise Content Strategy & Content Experience 3 @aames #LavaCon Introduction Instructor Workshop Participants
    • 4. IBM Enterprise Content Strategy & Content Experience 4 @aames #LavaCon About Andrea (@aames) Technical communicator since 1983 Areas of expertise: Content experience design: strategy, architecture, and interaction design Architecture, design, and development of product-embedded assistance Content and product usability User-centered process for content development and experience design Senior Technical Staff Member on corporate Client Technical Content Experience team, IBM CIO University of CA Extension program chair and master instructor STC Fellow, past president, former member of Board of Directors, and Intercomcolumnist (with Alyson Riley) of The Strategic IA ACM Distinguished Engineer
    • 5. IBM Enterprise Content Strategy & Content Experience 5 @aames #LavaCon Today’s agenda Part 1: Level set around a few key concepts Part 2: Analyze the “today state”: Problem, conditions, and requirements Part 3: Envision success and measure it Part 4: Tell the right story to manage your stakeholders Part 5: Wrap up
    • 6. IBM Enterprise Content Strategy & Content Experience 6 @aames #LavaCon Context and level-setting Organization considerations Systems thinking Content ecosystem Content strategy Content experience
    • 7. IBM Enterprise Content Strategy & Content Experience 7 @aames #LavaCon A little context-setting… Where do you live in this picture?
    • 8. IBM Enterprise Content Strategy & Content Experience 8 @aames #LavaCon Systems thinking, part 1from wikipedia(of course ;) The process of understanding how things, regarded as systems, influence one another within a whole An approach to problem solving Viewing “problems” as parts of an overall system, rather than reacting to specific part, outcomes or events, and potentially contributing to further development of unintended consequences A set of habits or practices within a framework that is based on the belief that the component parts of a system can best be understood in the context of relationships with each other and with other systems, rather than in isolation Focuses on cyclical rather than linear cause and effect
    • 9. IBM Enterprise Content Strategy & Content Experience 9 @aames #LavaCon Systems thinking, part 2from wikipedia(of course ;) And most importantly for our purposes… Attempts to illustrate how small, catalytic events that are separated by distance and time can cause significant changes in complex systems Acknowledges thatan improvement in one area can adversely affect another area Promotes organizational communication at all levels to avoid the silo effect
    • 10. IBM Enterprise Content Strategy & Content Experience 10 @aames #LavaCon The Iceberg ModelSummarized from It's All Connected: A Comprehensive Guide to Global Issues and Sustainable Solutions,Benjamin Wheeler, Gilda Wheeler and Wendy Church. www.facingthefuture.org Trends/patterns of behavior (anticipate) What’s been happening? Systemic structure(design) What is contributing to the patterns? Events(react) What happened? Increasing leverage Mental models(transform) What keeps these patterns going?
    • 11. IBM Enterprise Content Strategy & Content Experience 11 @aames #LavaCon A systems thinking modelfrom ecomind.wikidot.com, Ecology, Mind, & Systems
    • 12. IBM Enterprise Content Strategy & Content Experience 12 @aames #LavaCon Habits of a “systems thinker”
    • 13. IBM Enterprise Content Strategy & Content Experience 13 @aames #LavaCon People—the “living” organisms Roles Power structures and politics, governance Culture and community What is a “content ecosystem?” Products—outputs of the interaction within the system Content Packaging Artifacts Tools and technology Living and nonliving components Interacting Resulting in content ecosystem Processes—the nonliving components Models, metrics, best practices Interdependencies Communication
    • 14. IBM Enterprise Content Strategy & Content Experience 14 @aames #LavaCon What is a “content experience?” Content Presentation Delivery Navigation User •Message •Motivation •Form/format •Layout •Where •When •Organization •Structure •Perceptions •Judgments
    • 15. IBM Enterprise Content Strategy & Content Experience 15 @aames #LavaCon To users, often experienced more like this… Content Presentation Delivery Navigation User Content Presentation Delivery Navigation User Content Presentation Delivery Navigation User Content Presentation Delivery Navigation User Content Presentation Delivery Navigation User Content Presentation Delivery Navigation User
    • 16. IBM Enterprise Content Strategy & Content Experience 16 @aames #LavaCon Assess and analyze the “today state”
    • 17. IBM Enterprise Content Strategy & Content Experience 17 @aames #LavaCon 1. Before you begin 2. Identify sources and gather data A closer look at some specific inputs… 1 Analyzing business data
    • 18. IBM Enterprise Content Strategy & Content Experience 18 @aames #LavaCon Analyzing business dataStep 1: Before you begin Make sure that you are well-grounded and well-connected in the product or information experience that is your focus Show that “you belong” by building enough knowledge of the domain to ask intelligent questions—at this phase of the game, you don’t have to have the answers, but you do need to ask the right questions Be sure you are experienced in using the current version (if it exists), its information experience (IX), and the content ecosystem that supports that IX Gather and absorb any development plans and designs Find out where thought leaders are connecting and making decisions, and get involved! Be assertive! Join any relevant product development, product management, or user experience design teams to stay informed and advocate for content strategy and the value of information Network extensively with the extended product team (marketing, support, test, sales, and so on)—let them see your value Find and enlist a “sponsor” to help you get connected if this is new territory; a mentor to help you navigate these waters is even better
    • 19. IBM Enterprise Content Strategy & Content Experience 19 @aames #LavaCon Business plans and priorities: Business strategy Market intelligence Target customers Development plans and priorities: Product, solution, or service development plans Existing functional requirements, scenarios, use cases, etc. Analyzing business data—Step 2: Gather dataStep 2: Identify sources and gather data “But I can’t find this stuff!” Your company MUST have this data somewhere. You just haven’t made the right contact yet. Don’t give up. Keep fighting the good fight. “Why?” When you analyze data from development, try to figure out why the plans are what they are. Where did the requirements come from? How do you know they’re valid?
    • 20. IBM Enterprise Content Strategy & Content Experience 20 @aames #LavaCon Your company’s business strategy might be layered: Enterprise-level strategy Business unit strategies that support the enterprise strategic intent and focus items Product or portfolio strategy that delivers on business unit and enterprise strategy Mine business strategy data to discover: Customer priorities Company priorities Investment areas for future growth Plan for balancing competing opportunities and focus areas Roadmap for growth Analyzing business data—Step 2: Gather dataA closer look at business strategy, part 1
    • 21. IBM Enterprise Content Strategy & Content Experience 21 @aames #LavaCon Look for the “Why?”behind your company’s business strategy. Is your strategy a response to: Change, challenge, or opportunity in the marketplace? Change in the IT landscape? Change in financial realities or global dynamics? The answers to “Why?” will help you figure out what matters: Discern strategic priorities from point-in-time tactics Distinguish high-value investment and innovation from low-value “traditions” Identify high-impact opportunities where information can contribute to the success of market plays, key initiatives, or customer requirements Identify areas where you can demonstrate that content strategy maps precisely to the priorities of the enterprise, the business unit, and the product or portfolio Identify areas where you can demonstrate that content is a high-value product that customers want Identify business metrics to which you can connect content strategy outcomes Analyzing business data—Step 2: Gather dataA closer look at business strategy, part 2
    • 22. IBM Enterprise Content Strategy & Content Experience 22 @aames #LavaCon Analyzing business data—Step 2: Gather dataA closer look at market intelligence Market research happens at every layer of an enterprise Find channels into each layer and investigate things like: Sales support resources Customer references Market insights and intelligence Find the people who are the keepers of this information—build your network Ask colleagues in product management, user experience design, marketing, development, sales, etc. Do your own sleuthing! See what’s going on in industry literature and blogs, customer groups and social media Use market intelligence data to determine: What’s important to our customers What problems our customers are trying to solve What our competitors are doing and how you measure up (and does this vary by things like geographic location or industry?)
    • 23. IBM Enterprise Content Strategy & Content Experience 23 @aames #LavaCon Analyzing business data—Step 2: Gather dataA closer look at target customers Depending on your industry or the size of your business, your company may have a layered view of its target customers The business data that you uncover may refer to specific customers—”Company X” or “Client Y” Tease out which client layer the data address in order to understand what the data show about the target customer Take note of the way that specific messages in the content ecosystem target specific client layers The Big Cs: Executives—CEO, CIO, CTO, CFO, etc. Buyers: People who make purchase decisions Deployers: People (experts?) who plan solution roll-out Users: End users, the focus of the user experience A layered view of “the client” What do the decision-makers care about? What do the users care about? What issues concern the people who have to integrate the solution into the company environment?
    • 24. IBM Enterprise Content Strategy & Content Experience 24 @aames #LavaCon 1. Before you begin 2. Find critical client data 3. Identify any known client issues 4. Mine client data 5. Research and understand client metrics 2 Analyzing client data
    • 25. IBM Enterprise Content Strategy & Content Experience 25 @aames #LavaCon Analyzing client dataStep 1: Before you begin Get connected and build deep relationships with your user experience (UX) design team, if you have one If you don’t have a UX design team, it’s critical that you network with other members of the extended product team who have insights into the nature and needs of your client. (This is a good idea in general). Examples of these kinds of people include: Marketing reps Sales reps Trainers and education teams Beta programs Support reps Customer advocates or account reps Development team members who interact frequently with clients Your work to gather and analyze client data depends on good data about the client. If you can find the data you need, then prepare yourself: youneed to do the research to get the data. Prepare to become an agent of change!
    • 26. IBM Enterprise Content Strategy & Content Experience 26 @aames #LavaCon Analyzing client dataStep 2: Find critical client data Do the hard work to really knowyour client! Find: Personasthat define client/buyer/user goals, wants, needs, knowledge, motives, etc. Business scenariosthat define the target customer, their organization, their business goals and pain points, the users and the tasks that those users perform with the product or solution—in particular, their reason for buying your product Task scenariosthat define how users interact with the offering to complete the tasks that contribute to solving the larger business goals Examples of architectures, topologies, deployments, usage scenarios, application, or whatever to achieve a particular business result with your product User storiesor use cases that fill in the details of each scenario and highlight how the client will actually use your product (optional)Integration scenariosthat define how the task scenarios of multiple products fit together to solve the most important or difficult problems “No really. I can’t find this stuff!” Create it. Validate it. Share it. “But I can’t find this stuff!” Your company likely has this data somewhere—it just might look a little different than you’re used to. For example, it might look like support call summaries, business intelligence, or marketing reports.
    • 27. IBM Enterprise Content Strategy & Content Experience 27 @aames #LavaCon Analyzing client dataStep 3: Identify any known client issues You may already have a collection of known client issues. (Validate and document them—quotes are great; videos are better.) Use your network! Ask Support: “What kinds of customer calls are you getting? Any trends?” Ask Sales: “What’s the hardest part of your job selling our product? What do your customers like least about the product? How do we measure up to the products and people you’re competing against for the sale?” Ask your product management and development leads: “What kinds of customer issues are you hearing about most? What keeps you up at night?” Ask your Marketing representatives: “Are your market messages working as you had hoped? What kind of feedback are you getting? What ideas are taking hold?” Mine known client issues for data, such as: How the product compares to other products The success and quality of the product once it’s in real customer hands How content contributes to the success and quality of the product Opportunities for improvements in the information experience to contribute to improvements in the total offering or product user experience Requirements for content, both strategic and low-hanging fruit
    • 28. IBM Enterprise Content Strategy & Content Experience 28 @aames #LavaCon Analyzing client data Step 4: Mine client data Content strategists mine client data to determine: The identity of the target clients The business goals for which clients purchase the product, solution, service or whatever in the first place The tasks that clients must do to achieve their goals The tasks that clients have to do as a result of product or solution design Connections to other products, solutions or information Current and potential problem areas Connect dots & synthesize: Client business goals+ Client problems+ Business strategy= A great way to identifyopportunities where high-value content can make a difference that matters to business!!
    • 29. IBM Enterprise Content Strategy & Content Experience 29 @aames #LavaCon Analyzing client dataStep 5: Understand client metrics We’ve talked about relevant business metrics and development metrics thus far What about the client? What are your clients’ metrics? Do your clients value the same things that your business values? How do you know? Can you prove it? Key idea: think of yourself as a partner in your clients’ success (this is one of IBM’s core leadership competencies) Leverage network relationships with client-facing personnel. (Better yet, develop those relationships yourself.) Use those relationships to discover, prioritize, and validate client concerns. Here’s a simple list to get you started: ROI Time-to-success Time-to-value Ease of use Ease of maintenance and support Functional priorities
    • 30. IBM Enterprise Content Strategy & Content Experience 30 @aames #LavaCon 1. Before you begin 2. Analyze content 3. Analyze “packaging” 4. Analyze people 5. Analyze processes 3 Analyzing the current content ecosystem
    • 31. IBM Enterprise Content Strategy & Content Experience 31 @aames #LavaCon Analyzing the content ecosystemStep 1: Before you begin, part 1 To learn about the ecosystem as a whole, you need to build and leverage a network that includes subject matter experts from every facet and entity that participates in the content ecosystem—you need their expertise both to gather and interpret data Wherever possible, use metrics to distinguish opinion from fact—but don’t try to interpret the data you collect without others’ insights and experience Like any ecosystem, the content ecosystem is comprised of interdependent elements While it’s tempting to focus solely on the content facet of the ecosystem, you must see the system To gain a nuanced and true understanding of how the ecosystem works (and where you’ve got work to do), you need to analyze each element and how the system functions as a whole z content process people packaging
    • 32. IBM Enterprise Content Strategy & Content Experience 32 @aames #LavaCon Analyzing the content ecosystemStep 1: Before you begin, part 2 Your systems thinking skills are really getting a workout! Another system impacts the content ecosystem: the product lifecycle When assessing your content ecosystem, view it as the client/buyer/user sees it: an interconnected series of product interactions facilitated by content Interpret the effectiveness of your content ecosystem by asking: How well does the ecosystem function in and between each phase of the product lifecycle? A generalized view ofIBM’s product lifecycle
    • 33. IBM Enterprise Content Strategy & Content Experience 33 @aames #LavaCon Analyzing the content ecosystemStep 1: Before you begin, part 3 material objects, actions— owned, controlled, repeatable commodities made of scarce resources immaterialknowledge, competencies, emotions— not owned, boxed, or controlledavailable in abundance *Adapted from Miikka Leiononen’s “Melt,” here * Effective content ecosystems generate profitfor the business and valuefor the client: In the knowledge economy, profitis created by “stuff” but valueis created by content: new economy old economy Remember what the content ecosystem is for… Company- generated information
    • 34. IBM Enterprise Content Strategy & Content Experience 34 @aames #LavaCon Analyzing the content ecosystemStep 1: Before you begin, part 4 A word about assessing a content ecosystem… When you analyze the content ecosystem, you look at: Content Packaging People Processes When you measure the content ecosystem, make sure you identify or define measurements for: Content Packaging People Processes Only measuring contentwill not give you a complete assessment of the effectiveness of the ecosystem Think about: Metrics for external effectiveness Metrics for internal efficiency
    • 35. IBM Enterprise Content Strategy & Content Experience 35 @aames #LavaCon Analyzing the content ecosystemStep 2: Analyze content, part 1 To assess content health, do a heuristic evaluation: How well does the content meet client/buyer/user needs? Go back to your client data—are the high-priority client business goals, scenarios, and tasks thoroughly covered? Can you easily see the value propositions for the product in the content ecosystem? Is the content client-centered, task-focused, and high-value? How thoroughly does the content cover the full product lifecycle? Are there gaps or disconnects between the phases of the product lifecycle? Are there content redundancies or inconsistencies that could derail or confuse a client? Does the content enable client success in the typical tasks within each phase? How well does the content address typical client content needs? How well does the current information experience address product content such as up-and-running, getting started, preventing or recovering from errors, and so on? Does the information experience include embedded assistance where appropriate?
    • 36. IBM Enterprise Content Strategy & Content Experience 36 @aames #LavaCon Analyzing the content ecosystemStep 2: Analyze content, part 2 Continued… How well does the content address typical information-seeking behaviors? Starting: identifying relevant sources of interest. Chaining: following and connecting new leads found in an initial content source. Browsing: scanning contents of identified sources for subject affinity. Monitoring: staying informed about developments in a particular subject area. Differentiating: filtering and assessing content sources for usefulness. Extracting: working through a source to find content of interest. How well does the content contribute to a delightful client experience? Is the information experience elegant in its presentation, visual design, etc.? Are there opportunities to simplify or innovate? Are there opportunities to improve the information experience, such as: Improvements to the product that result in a need for less content? Tighter integration between interaction (UI) and information? Simplified information architecture—fewer sources, fewer pages, designed paths?
    • 37. IBM Enterprise Content Strategy & Content Experience 37 @aames #LavaCon Analyzing the content ecosystem—Step 2: Analyze contentWhat is high-value content? As you analyze today-state content, spot the high-value content—track it, measure it, note its impact on the information experience High-value content is content that: Speaks directly to client/buyer/user business goals Includes only the tasks necessary to achieve those goals Aids the client in making decisions or applying concepts in their own situations Is technically rich in the sense that it includes validated real-world samples, examples, best practices, and lessons learned High value content does not: Focus on manipulating elements of a user interface (those things that everyone should know by now, such as "Type your name in the name field") Describe tasks that can't be mapped to a meaningful goal or objective Describe what to do without explaining how to do it Describe how to do it without explaining whyto do it !
    • 38. IBM Enterprise Content Strategy & Content Experience 38 @aames #LavaCon How do you measure high value content? That depends! If your goal is to convince others that high value content matters, look at: How does my content contribute to clients' purchase decisions? Is there click-through data and contributions to conversions on marketing pages that I can reference? How does my content contribute to clients' perceptions of product quality? What's the relationship between quality problems in my content and known quality problems with the product? How does my content contribute to client satisfaction with our products? How does my content contribute to the product visibility (and thus the sales cycle and revenue streams) in the marketplace? What kind of social capital is being generated around my content? Who's active, and how active are they? How frequently and with what impact am I engaging with customers through my content? What are they talking about—nits, or requirements for content or broader product strategy? Does the sum of the social conversation support IBM business strategy and advance the eminence of our brand? If your goal is to assess the effectiveness of your content and experience, look at: Heuristic evaluations (we just talked about this) Traditional web statistics Analyzing the content ecosystem—Step 2: Analyze contentAssess today-state content metrics, part 1 We’ll talk more about business metrics later on— let’s look at web stats now…
    • 39. IBM Enterprise Content Strategy & Content Experience 39 @aames #LavaCon Analyzing the content ecosystem—Step 2: Analyze contentAssess today-state content metrics, part 2 Web metrics are one way to assess the effectiveness of content Content strategists use web metrics to gain a clear picture of client/buyer/user activity in the current information experience that the content ecosystem supports: Historical data: Number of visitors to the site or page over time User data: Who is visiting your site and where they are located Page popularity: Most and least accessed pages File types: Files that have been loaded as opposed to viewed Operating systems and browsers: Browsers and devices used to view content Referrers: Who is pointing to your stuff, and who isn’t as expected Referrals: How people are getting to your stuff Search terms: Words with which users describe and try to find your content Robots and spiders: Programs that have crawled your site in order to provide information about site contents to search engines
    • 40. IBM Enterprise Content Strategy & Content Experience 40 @aames #LavaCon Analyzing the content ecosystem—Step 2: Analyze contentAssess today-state content metrics, part 3 Interpret current web statistics to understand how clients: Search for the information—whether the content is optimized for search engines (SEO); what click-through and bounce rates show about user paths and success Enter the experience—whether designed entry points are effective Think about the information space—what search terms they enter, what topics they pick as they browse found content Navigate the information space—whether user paths make sense relative to your understanding of their business goals and tasks Use the information—how actual usage patterns differ from designed or predicted usage patterns; how much time they spend on certain pages; whether they’re accessing content on mobile devices, etc. Value the information—any social interaction to consider? Web usage statistics give us hints at the core issues: Is my content ecosystem performing in the ways that I expect it to, based on user actions? Is the information experience effective? Is my content high-value, or just highly-findable?
    • 41. IBM Enterprise Content Strategy & Content Experience 41 @aames #LavaCon Consider “packaging” aspects of the ecosystem: Is the presentation of content effective and predictable across the ecosystem? Does the visual design of content support the branding strategy for the product? Where and how is your content delivered to the client? Lots of places? One place? Do the delivery vehicles integrate well with each other? Is the content easily accessible from the client’s context or point of need? How findable is your content across delivery vehicles? Are the signposts for wayfinding visible, usable, and predictable across the ecosystem? Is your content progressively disclosed in support of clients’ need for increasing depth or breadth of content? In the information experience, several mediators come between the client/buyer/user and the content. We call these mediators “packaging”: Presentation—the visual design of the content Delivery—the vehicle used to publish the content for client access Navigation—the various ways in which the user finds the content Analyzing the content ecosystemStep 3: Analyze “packaging”
    • 42. IBM Enterprise Content Strategy & Content Experience 42 @aames #LavaCon Analyzing the content ecosystemStep 3: Analyze people Who are the human players in the ecosystem? Internal players Professional content producers Marketing team Sales enablement content team Education teams Beta programs teams Support teams Product documentation teams Non-professional content producers Subject matter experts Client-facing personnel External players Business partners Clients, with all their social networking tools and capabilities What unique value does each player contribute to the ecosystem? Look for:  Strengths—these are your assets!  Mission overlap—these are your pitfalls!  Ways to maximize organizational capabilities—this is your vision!
    • 43. IBM Enterprise Content Strategy & Content Experience 43 @aames #LavaCon Analyzing the content ecosystemStep 4: Analyze process The processes at work in the content ecosystem have as profound an effect as the content itself. Analyze: What processes are present in the ecosystem? Business processes Corporate-level processes Business unit-level processes Content design and delivery process Processes that span all content producers Processes unique to individual content producing teams Are the processes effective? Do processes make it easier or harder to package content for publishing? Do processes make it easier or harder for people to work together? Do process make it easier or harder to produce high-value content?
    • 44. IBM Enterprise Content Strategy & Content Experience 44 @aames #LavaCon 1. Before you begin 2. Do a little archaeology 3. Assess the treasure you find 4 Analyzing history
    • 45. IBM Enterprise Content Strategy & Content Experience 45 @aames #LavaCon Analyzing historyStep 1: Before you begin Find people who represent multiple perspectives Your view of history depends on who you are Get multiple views to triangulate upon “truth” Go in with humility You may have the latest tools, techniques, and technology, but these alone will not guarantee your success Start from the assumption that people have good motives and are doing their best Dig deep, and wear your systems-thinking hat Pay attention to organizational dynamics, significant relationships, cause-and-effect, and systemic issues Look past obvious issues—try to understand pressures, motives, and circumstances Don’t let it drag you down Learn from the past—but don’t believe everything you hear “History is bunk.” –Henry Ford “Those unable to catalog the past are doomed to repeat it.” —Lemony Snicket
    • 46. IBM Enterprise Content Strategy & Content Experience 46 @aames #LavaCon Analyzing historyStep 2: Do a little archaeology on the content ecosystem 1. Who was here before? 2. What did they do? 3. Why did they do it? 4. What worked well? 5. What didn’t work so well? 6. What challenges did they encounter? 7. What did they learn?
    • 47. IBM Enterprise Content Strategy & Content Experience 47 @aames #LavaCon Analyzing historyStep 3: Assess the archaeological treasure you find What did you learn? Any lessons from history that can help you form a strategy? Did develop a better appreciation for why things are the way they are? What failures from the past can you turn into future opportunities? Use your new historical perspective Show respect for—win the respect of—those who have been there before Identify potential roadblocks—politics, resources, schedules, skills, people Identify potential heroes and pre-heroes (read: villains that you haven’t won over yet) Go in fore-warned and fore-armed Prepare effective messages to counter arguments that history suggests you are likely to encounter
    • 48. IBM Enterprise Content Strategy & Content Experience 48 @aames #LavaCon 1. Before you begin 2. Consider political factors that may influence your success 3. Manage stakeholders 5 Analyzing the political landscape
    • 49. IBM Enterprise Content Strategy & Content Experience 49 @aames #LavaCon Analyzing the political landscapeStep 1: Before you begin—get your head in the game If you’re not there already, content strategy requires you to step into the world of politics Think of it as a game—moving pieces on a board You can’t touch the pieces directly to move them where you want them You have to inspire them to move You inspire them by figuring out what they care about, and speaking to that It doesn’t have to be an evil game Look for win-win alliances and opportunities Discover and play to people’s strengths Enjoy finding kindred spirits in the game—don’t get bogged down by pieces on the board that refuse to move Enjoy the wins—be sure to share the rewards Learn from the losses—keep your eye on the end game on not on emotional setbacks Make smart for the greater good—but remember who you are
    • 50. IBM Enterprise Content Strategy & Content Experience 50 @aames #LavaCon Analyzing the political landscapeStep 2: Consider political factors that may influence your chance of success 1. Do I have the right big picture view of what my organization cares about? Executives? Visionaries? Management? The proletariat? (political metaphor, you know) 2. Where are there opportunities for me to connect my strategy to initiatives in which the organization is already investing? What problems does my strategy help solve? What opportunities does my strategy help maximize? Keep asking: What are my options? Where are my opportunities? 3. Whose agendas do I need to understand to be successful? Which influencers can help me? What are their agendas? Which influencers could block me? What are their agendas? 4. Put it all together—which path forward seems most promising? Where do you need to campaign? Where do you need to gain allies?
    • 51. IBM Enterprise Content Strategy & Content Experience 51 @aames #LavaCon Analyzing the political landscapeStep 3: Manage your stakeholders Your best political asset—your stakeholders! A rigorous stakeholder management process will help you take rigorous advantage of this key asset Think through the ways that your stakeholders can help you—start by identifying and analyzing: Their status relative to your project—advocate, supporter, neutral, critic, blocker Their top interests and hot issues Their key performance indicators (KPIs) and metrics The level of support you desire from them The role on your project that you desire for them The actions that you want them to take (and their priority) The messages that you need to craft for them to enable the outcome you want The actions and communication that you need to make happen with each stakeholder to achieve your desired outcome Keep your stakeholder management plan current “Stakeholder management is critical to the success of every project in every organization … By engaging the right people in the right way in your project, you can make a big difference to its success... and to your career.” —Rachel ThompsonSource and free stakeholder management worksheet here: Thompson, Rachel. Stakeholder Management: Planning Stakeholder Communication. MindTools. Web. 12 April 2013. http://bit.ly/8UnUdj
    • 52. IBM Enterprise Content Strategy & Content Experience 52 @aames #LavaCon Identifying and prioritizing requirements
    • 53. IBM Enterprise Content Strategy & Content Experience 53 @aames #LavaCon 1. Before you begin 2. Extract requirements from the business, user, historical, and political data you collected 3. Articulate requirements effectively 4. Group requirements 5. Prioritize requirements 6 Identifying and prioritizing requirements
    • 54. IBM Enterprise Content Strategy & Content Experience 54 @aames #LavaCon Identifying requirements Step 1: Before you begin—procedural overview determine the importance of individual requirements to user success —to product success —to business success all the data you collected become requirements business priorities, market plays, competitive analysis, target customers [why your company produced the product] client goals, tasks, work context, wants, needs, and motives [why clients purchase the product in the first place] what the business needs and values (and doesn’t) what the client needs and values (and don’t) that you prioritize to identify strategic focus areas
    • 55. IBM Enterprise Content Strategy & Content Experience 55 @aames #LavaCon Identifying requirementsStep 2: Extract requirements from data Think deeply about what the data you collected shows you—mine the data for: Themes or systemic issues Problems Opportunities Reflect on history and the current state Don’t think about the future just yet Consider: What is the want or need? Who wants or needs it? Why do they want or need it? How might the want or need be addressed? (Caution: don’t get too far into implementation details at this stage.) Each need is a requirement!
    • 56. IBM Enterprise Content Strategy & Content Experience 56 @aames #LavaCon Identifying requirementsStep 3: Articulate requirements effectively Write requirements as simply as possible: Pragmatic Marketing recommends (and we like) this approach: [Persona] has [problem] with [frequency]. [Alyson and Andrea] have [a hard time focusing on the task at hand when they are having fun making charts for LavaCon] [pretty much all the time]. Pragmatic Marketing also says that the best requirements are SMART: Specific—precisely what to achieve Measurable—all stakeholders can determine if the objectives are being met Achievable—attainable objectives Realistic—doable with available resources Time-bound—when the desired results must be achieved Pragmatic Marketing’s 5 Pitfalls of Requirement Writing 1. Not knowing the audience 2. Ambiguity 3. Squeezing a solution into the problem 4. Not making form follow function 5. Not having a holistic approach who whatwhywherewhen how X
    • 57. IBM Enterprise Content Strategy & Content Experience 57 @aames #LavaCon Identifying requirementsStep 4: Group requirements Group requirements into categories to make prioritizing them a little easier Pick the group that makes the most sense for your work—here are some examples: By area of impact (from these charts): Requirements to fulfill client/buyer/user wants and needs Requirements to support business strategy and objectives (and all that entails) Requirements that address historical issues Requirements that address issues in the political landscape By type (suggested by Pragmatic Marketing): Functional requirements—capabilities needed Performance requirements—capacity, speed, ease-of-use, etc. Constraint requirements—conditions that limit the strategy or design Interface requirements—interactions needed Security requirements—such as client privacy or government mandate Card sort image thanks to UX Matters
    • 58. IBM Enterprise Content Strategy & Content Experience 58 @aames #LavaCon Identifying requirements Step 5: Prioritize requirements, part 1 Prioritizing requirements is an art—but we can follow a repeatable process to ensure rigor and high-quality outcomes: 1. Assign each requirement a low, medium, or highpriority according to its: Value to the client Helps achieve the business goal for which the product was purchased in the first place (speeds time-to-value) Helps complete a goal or task (speeds time-to-success) Solves a problem—better yet, prevents a problem (increases customer satisfaction) Improves user experience (increases customer satisfaction) Simplifies; delights (increases customer loyalty) Value to business strategy Contributes to product visibility and success in the marketplace Contributes to brand recognition and mindshare Value to development Supports product functionality or capabilities Saves resources (political note: content band-aids don’t save money long-term!)
    • 59. IBM Enterprise Content Strategy & Content Experience 59 @aames #LavaCon Identifying requirements Step 5: Prioritize requirements, part 2 …continued: 2. Identify the “must-do” items, and mark them highpriority. Caution: Think critically about those must-do items! Why are they must-do? Ask yourself: Do these requirements support user needs or business strategy? Or are they “because we’ve always done it this way” requirements? Or “because Ithink it should be like this” requirements? Do the requirements yield high-value content that maps to clients’ real-world business goals? Can you prove it? Or are they “because we must have one help topic per user interface panel” kinds of requirements? Is it because “development told me to” or “marketing insisted?” That doesn’t necessarily mean the requirement is really a high priority one. What does your analysis tell you? 3. Ensure that requirements high in value to your clients, your product strategy, and your overarching business strategy are marked higher in priority than those items that are only valuable to one or two of those areas. 4. Group items by priority, from high to low.
    • 60. IBM Enterprise Content Strategy & Content Experience 60 @aames #LavaCon Identifying requirements Step 5: Prioritize requirements, part 3 …continued: 5. Rank high-priority items by doability: Identify any low-hanging fruit(easy or quick to address). Do you have the necessary time, skill, and technology resources? Does the team have the resources to implement the solution? 6. Do the same for medium priority items. 7. Hang on to the low-priority items for now; depending on time and resources, you may be able to incorporate them into your information strategy and architecture. 8. Share and validate your focus area prioritization with stakeholders: Start at home first: get feedback from your content team. Use this time to: Help the team think strategically about the future Collaborate with management about resource requirements and the best ways to deploy skills strategically against high-priority work Help your executive management chain think about the business value of content through discussions of your focus items and priorities. Then get feedback from your extended offering team and your users.
    • 61. IBM Enterprise Content Strategy & Content Experience 61 @aames #LavaCon Identifying requirements Step 5: Prioritize requirements—summary 1. Absorb—synthesize—summarize into requirements and groups of requirements 2. If you get stuck, try a free-form card sort or an old-fashioned SWOT analysis: Strengths Weaknesses Opportunities Threats 3. Prioritize: critical vs. nice-to-have Define a scale to communicate impact—high impact, low impact Define a scale to communicate effort—high effort, low effort Get as close to the ideal as you can—high impact, low effort Do this for all the kinds of requirements that your data revealed 4. Be prepared to show evidence for all of the above Quotes are good Videos are great Numbers are better (provided they’re the rightnumbers) Numbers AND videos are best
    • 62. IBM Enterprise Content Strategy & Content Experience 62 @aames #LavaCon Part 2: Complete! Upon completing this analysis, you now have: – A deep understanding of business and user requirements – A deep understanding of the current content ecosystem – A nuanced perspective on why things are the way they are – A sense for what it will take to drive change in content strategy in the current organization and climate – A collection of prioritized requirements—the what, who, and why(but not how) of business, client, content, historical, and political requirements
    • 63. IBM Enterprise Content Strategy & Content Experience 63 @aames #LavaCon Defining and measuring success
    • 64. IBM Enterprise Content Strategy & Content Experience 64 @aames #LavaCon 1. Before you begin—rethinking metrics 2. Plan to sell to two different audiences 3. Map stakeholders to metrics 4. Map content metrics to stakeholder metrics 5. Set metrics-based goals 6. Plan for a closed-loop process 1 Defining success
    • 65. IBM Enterprise Content Strategy & Content Experience 65 @aames #LavaCon Defining successStep 1: Before you begin—rethink metrics, part 1 Problem: Metrics have gotten a bad rap Numbers can be hard for word people The rightnumbers are hard for everyone Getting metrics to work for you requires a significant shift in thinking Solution: Rethink metrics Metrics are another form of audience analysis (who cares about what?) Metrics are another form of usability testing (what works for whom?) Motivation for change: Metrics are a powerful tool for getting what you want (and making sure you want the right things) Metrics transform opinion into fact Metrics remove emotion from analysis and decision-making Strategize with metrics: Use metrics at every phase Beginning: identify opportunity, prove the strategy is right Middle: show incremental progress, course-correct End: to prove value and earn investment for the future
    • 66. IBM Enterprise Content Strategy & Content Experience 66 @aames #LavaCon Defining successStep 1: Before you begin—rethink metrics, part 2 A strategist is (among other things) a story-teller: Define the right vision Tell a compelling, true story that inspires people to buy into your vision. What makes a story true? Facts—things you can prove. What makes a story compelling? It speaks to what matters most. What matters most? Depends on your audience. Duh, right? We prove the valueof content with metrics Value is in the eye of the beholder. Who’s your “beholder?” Understand who your beholders actually are—that is, the real decision-makers and influencers in your world. (Remember the stakeholder management plan from Part 1?) Use metrics that target actual decision-makers. Your actual decision-makers are probably business people—executives, managers, and others who hold the purse-strings. Figure out what your audience values—theirmetrics for success.
    • 67. IBM Enterprise Content Strategy & Content Experience 67 @aames #LavaCon Defining successStep 1: Before you begin—rethink metrics, part 3 So what audience are we speaking to when we talk about things like this? Site visitors Page hits Visitor location Most popular pages Least popular pages Bounce rate Time spent on page Referrals and referrers Search terms Etc.
    • 68. IBM Enterprise Content Strategy & Content Experience 68 @aames #LavaCon Defining successStep 2: Plan to sell to 2 different audiences Audience 1: Business people Unless you can make a direct connection between your content metrics and the metrics that drive business, you are telling the wrong story for this audience. You need this audience! The business community funds us. We have to sell our vision to them, with a metrics story that resonates with them. We must learn to speak “business”—that is, prove the value of content using metrics that matter to business. Audience 2: Content producer people A enterprise content ecosystem typically includes many kinds of content producers Content producers across the ecosystem tend to reflect the values of their leadership and business unit in which they’re located This means that even kindred spirits—other content people—can have widely different goals and metrics Your job is to define common ground by speaking to what matters most to this audience, too.
    • 69. IBM Enterprise Content Strategy & Content Experience 69 @aames #LavaCon Defining success—Step 2: Selling to two audiencesSelling content strategy to a business audience The kinds of metrics that we use to build effective content strategies don’t resonate with most executives, managers, and finance people. Sometimes we “talk to ourselves”—that is, use metrics that resonate with content people, not the actual people we need to support our strategy. “Page hits” resonate with us. “Sales leads” resonates with business. You cannot directly connect things like page hits and bounce rates to core business metrics. You need an informational professional’s intuition to know how content supports business metrics—most business people don’t have that intuition. The business audience funds us. We have to sell our vision and prove our value to them, with a metrics story that speaks to what they care about most. Examplebusiness metrics: Revenue streamsSales leadsCost per leadCustomer satisfactionCustomer loyaltyReturn on investment (ROI) Time to valueMarket shareMindshare
    • 70. IBM Enterprise Content Strategy & Content Experience 70 @aames #LavaCon At IBM, we’re learning to tell a better story for a business audience We conducted a survey from 2010-2012 with clients and prospective clients about the value of content—here’s the hot-off-the-press data: Defining success—Step 2: Selling to two audiencesProving the business value of content—IBM example Shameless ad: The May 2013 issue of STC’s Intercommagazine contains an article that Alyson Riley and I wrote on proving the business value of content.
    • 71. IBM Enterprise Content Strategy & Content Experience 71 @aames #LavaCon Defining success—Step 2: Selling to two audiencesSelling content strategy to a content audience Analyze each organization or team that contributes to the content ecosystem In what business unit are they located? Who are their executives, sponsors, and stakeholders? Who “grades them” on their performance? Who funds them? What matters to them? How do they measure their progress or results? What are they doing well (both in your analysis and theirs)? Where can they improve (both in your analysis and theirs)? Identify areas of similarity and difference Where do their goals align with yours? build bridges! Where do their goals conflict with yours? build business cases! Use metrics to craft a story that: Shows problems and opportunities that each content team cares about Maps in key areas to their goals for content Diverges from their current goals in ways that would increase their value to sponsors and stakeholders
    • 72. IBM Enterprise Content Strategy & Content Experience 72 @aames #LavaCon Defining successStep 3: Map stakeholders to metrics Remember the stakeholder management plan from “Assessing and analyzing the today-state?” Here’s another place where it provides value. Be highly intentional about making sure that your metrics plan includes data that map to the things your key stakeholders care about. This mapping activity will help you: Validate your strategy—does your work align with mission-critical organizational objectives? Prepare persuasive communications for your key decision-makers—do you have the framework for a strong story to connect in meaningful ways with your various stakholders?
    • 73. IBM Enterprise Content Strategy & Content Experience 73 @aames #LavaCon Defining success—Step 3: Map stakeholders to metricsMetrics for a business audience Use the research you did during the today-state analysis phase Target the key decisions- makers—those who hold the purse-strings Identify what the key business decision-makers care about Use language that resonates with that business audience Remember: unless you can tie a particular goal or result to a measurement that the stakeholder cares about, that result ultimately doesn’t matter Stakeholder Example metrics VP Marketing  ROI  Cost per lead  Campaign performance  Conversion metrics VP Sales  Viable leads  Sales growth  Product performance VP Support  Call volume  Call length  Customer satisfaction VP Development  Development costs  Market share  Lines of code  Compliance  Quality and test results
    • 74. IBM Enterprise Content Strategy & Content Experience 74 @aames #LavaCon Defining success—Step 3: Map stakeholders to metricsMetrics for a content team audience Now map players in the content ecosystem to the metrics they care about Remember that each content team has their own decision- makers who: Approve their goals Determine their funding Determine their futures Stakeholder Example metrics Example associated content teams Example content metrics VP Marketing  ROI  Cost per lead  Campaign performance  Conversion metrics  Web team  Social team  Event team  Web traffic  Click-throughs  Likes and shares  Conversions  Collateral distributed  Cost per unit produced VP Sales  Viable leads  Sales growth  Product performance  Sales enablement  Education & training  Beta programs  Proofs of Concept (PoCs) to sale  Number of classes  Beta program participants  Cost per unit produced VP Support  Call volume  Call length  Customer satisfaction  Web support team  Call center team  Amount of web information produced  Number of calls reduced  Time of calls reduced  Cost per unit produced VP Development  Dev cost  Market share  Lines of code  Compliance  Quality and test  Product documentation team  Developers who publish whitepapers and case studies  Product community forums and wikis  Lines of text, number of pages, etc.  Cost per unit produced  Web traffic  Number of forum participants
    • 75. IBM Enterprise Content Strategy & Content Experience 75 @aames #LavaCon Defining successStep 4: Map content metrics to stakeholder metrics Tie your content strategy metrics to the metrics that matter most to your stakeholders so you can tell a story that inspires the outcomes you want. This means researching how content influences the metrics that are most important to the specific people you need for success. Start your research with these hints: How does content drive purchase decisions? direct link to the revenue stream How does content impact product quality? direct link to customer loyalty How does content influence customer satisfaction? direct link to ROI How does content shape clients’ perceptions of your company? direct link to mindshare
    • 76. IBM Enterprise Content Strategy & Content Experience 76 @aames #LavaCon Defining successStep 5: Set metrics-based goals So what are the goals for your content strategy? Express those goals in the form of business metrics andcontent metrics. Some examples: Business metrics Sample content metrics Sample content goals Purchase decisions (revenue)  Reach—visits, etc.  Engagement—referrals, etc. Contribute to revenue stream through referrals from technical content that become sales leads. Product quality (customer loyalty)  Reach—visits, etc.  Engagement—referrals, etc. Contribute to product quality through by simplifying the amount of content in the user experience. Customer satisfaction (ROI)  Web traffic  Direct feedback  Ratings  Shares (social) Create high value content that speeds customer time to success. Perceptions of company (mindshare)  Sentiment—nature of social dialogue, etc.  Direct feedback Create high quality, highly usable content delivered in an elegant information experience.
    • 77. IBM Enterprise Content Strategy & Content Experience 77 @aames #LavaCon Defining successStep 6: Plan for a closed-loop process Closed loop: end up at the beginning! Start with metrics—use at project outset to: Identify problems and opportunities Define the vision Prove that the vision is right Continue with metrics—use during implementation to: Measure the success of your progress in small increments Stay on-target through implementation Determine when it’s time to course-correct (before change gets expensive) Keep your sponsors and stakeholders engaged throughout the long haul Ensure that you remain connected to the broader goals and metrics of the surrounding business Ensure that you stay responsive and adapt to change End with metrics—use at project conclusion to: Prove the business value of cultivating an effective content ecosystem Prove the business value of your work—enhance your credibility and career Encourage future investment in the content ecosystem
    • 78. IBM Enterprise Content Strategy & Content Experience 78 @aames #LavaCon Part 3 Complete! Upon completing this work, you now have: A high-level metrics plan that defines success and specifies tactics for staying on-target as teams across the content ecosystem work together to make progress toward the strategy that you defined.
    • 79. IBM Enterprise Content Strategy & Content Experience 79 @aames #LavaCon Managing your stakeholders
    • 80. IBM Enterprise Content Strategy & Content Experience 80 @aames #LavaCon 1. Before you begin—understanding the role and value of stakeholders 2. Assess your stakeholders 3. Build a community-based model 4. Tell the right story 1 Managing your stakeholders
    • 81. IBM Enterprise Content Strategy & Content Experience 81 81 @aames #LavaCon Managing your stakeholdersStep 1: Before you begin—their role and value To make content strategy happen, you have to master politics Think of it as a game—moving pieces on a board You can’t touch the pieces directly to move them where you want them You have to inspire them to move You inspire them by figuring out what they care about and helping them succeed It doesn’t have to be an evil game Look for win-win alliances and opportunities Discover and play to people’s strengths Enjoy finding kindred spirits in the game—don’t get bogged down by pieces on the board that refuse to move Enjoy the wins—be sure to share the rewards Learn from the losses—keep your eye on the end game on not on emotional setbacks Make smart compromises for the greater good—but remember who you are
    • 82. IBM Enterprise Content Strategy & Content Experience 82 @aames #LavaCon Managing your stakeholdersStep 2: Assess your stakeholders Whose agendas do you need to understand to be successful? Which influencers can help you? What are their agendas? Which influencers could block you? What are their agendas? How can you help your influencers be successful? How can you map your success to business priorities and metrics? Manage your stakeholders intentionally: Their top concerns Their metrics The level of support you desire from them What role they play (or you’d like them to play) in your work The actions that you want them to take (and their priority) The messages that you need to craft for them to enable the outcome you want —Rachel Thompson Stakeholder Management: Planning Stakeholder Communication. MindTools. Web. 12 April 2013. Free stakeholder management worksheet here:http://bit.ly/8UnUdj “Stakeholder management is critical to the success of every project in every organization … By engaging the right people in the right way in your project, you can make a big difference to its success... and to your career.”
    • 83. IBM Enterprise Content Strategy & Content Experience 83 @aames #LavaCon Managing your stakeholdersStep 3: Build a community-based model Executive sponsor Business unit sponsors Content thought leaders from each domain or department Content teams from each domain or department infrastructure gurus graphic design content marketing product management Network of supportive friends interaction design engineering writers editors
    • 84. IBM Enterprise Content Strategy & Content Experience 84 @aames #LavaCon Managing your stakeholdersStep 3: Build a community-based model, cont. Define priorities Which common metrics can we unite around? Which metrics will we be measured against? Which common metrics tell our story best? Take first steps toward impact What mission unites us? What small, measurable projects could we do together to build relationships and demonstrate incremental progress? How can we crawl—walk—run toward value? Communicate constantly—up, down, across Take interim measurements Maintain sponsor interest Course-correct as needed
    • 85. IBM Enterprise Content Strategy & Content Experience 85 @aames #LavaCon Managing your stakeholdersStep 4: Tell the right story What your metrics give you: The “black and white” part of your strategy The facts that prove your strategy is a good one An argument that speaks to the analytical mind What your metrics don’t give you: A guaranteed successful “sell” to your stakeholders A vision that inspires people to believe A story that speaks to the emotional heart Think through the content, tactics, and rhetorical devices that will sell your vision Be sure that your metrics help you gather all the data you need to tell an ethos—logos—pathos story (huh?)
    • 86. IBM Enterprise Content Strategy & Content Experience 86 @aames #LavaCon Ethos—your credibility (professionalism; authority) Logos—the logic of your argument; the clarity of your message and evidence, using either inductive (bottom-up) or deductive (top-down) reasoning Pathos—an emotional appeal, vivid storytelling, creative envisioning Use all the techniques you can to help your audience visualize the future! Show, don’t tell—include imagery, video, and audio as appropriate to show the challenges of the today-state and help your audience imagine tomorrow Keep your packaging professional—high-quality, visually-appealing charts and documents will enhance your ethos Help your audience learn—start with the big picture (an executive summary), then feed them the details Remember good old Aristotle? Use your skills as a technical communicator to tell a compelling story with your business case! Ensure your story speaks to: Managing your stakeholdersStep 4: Tell the right story
    • 87. IBM Enterprise Content Strategy & Content Experience 87 @aames #LavaCon Managing stakeholdersStep 4: Tell the right story, cont. Ethos Your authority, credibility, professionalism, and authenticity Pathos Emotional appeal, vivid imagery, creative envisioning, imagining Logos Logic, data, clarity, evidence— either inductive (bottom-up) or deductive (top-down) reasoning Use metricsto:  Speak to the analytical mind  Tell the “black and white” part of your strategy  Articulate facts that prove that your strategy is a good one Use visionto:  Speak to the heart  Inspire people to believe  Craft a narrative that resonates and lingers long after you’ve left the room Use expert communicationto:  Prove that you own the space  Provide powerful evidence that you are worthy of trust and investment  Build a network of influencers
    • 88. IBM Enterprise Content Strategy & Content Experience 88 @aames #LavaCon Building your business case
    • 89. IBM Enterprise Content Strategy & Content Experience 89 @aames #LavaCon 1. Before you begin 2. Specify the issue 3. Depict the outcome 4. Articulate your recommendation 5. Provide justification 6. Identify the team 2 Building a high-level business case
    • 90. IBM Enterprise Content Strategy & Content Experience 90 @aames #LavaCon Building a business caseStep 1: Before you begin—embrace the case The beauty of black-and-white—a business case helps you: Ensure that your strategy is complete and that you’ve thought through every potential issue Fight the battle for content strategy by equipping you with powerful ammunition Transform your message from “I want this” to “These critical data show that…” Demonstrate rigor and professionalism Assert your credibility—it is the lingua franca of the business world Lots of mental roadblocks out there about writing business cases! Let’s demystify business cases a bit! There are lots of approaches and templates out there for building good business cases—but for our purposes today, let’s pare down the content in a typical business to a few key ideas…
    • 91. IBM Enterprise Content Strategy & Content Experience 91 @aames #LavaCon Building a business caseStep 2: Specify the issue Describe the business problem—clearly, briefly, factually What business problem does your content strategy solve? What is the impact of this business problem—today, and tomorrow? Go back to your metrics and stakeholder management plans—state the problem in those terms, mapped directly to business priorities “Management is concerned with decreasing costs and increasing revenue, so state the problem in those terms.” —Jack Molisani “Don’t assume that management can see the ‘pain’ of this problem as clearly as you can.” —Jack Molisani Do not describe how the problem will be addressed—merely define the problem.
    • 92. IBM Enterprise Content Strategy & Content Experience 92 @aames #LavaCon Building a business caseStep 3: Depict the outcome What would an ideal tomorrow-state look like? What would success look like? This is the spot where you help your audience imagine the possibilities that your solution will address! Your vision!
    • 93. IBM Enterprise Content Strategy & Content Experience 93 @aames #LavaCon Building a business caseStep 4: Articulate your recommendation So how do we achieve the outcome you described? Describe your solution and how your solution solves the problem Describe the benefits of your solution (another spot where you can use those metrics and stakeholder management plans) Revenue? Customer satisfaction? Client ROI? Mindshare? Marketshare? Cost reduction or avoidance? You get the idea… Describe how moving forward with your strategy will achieve desirable results. Use your skills as a technical communicator—write your justifications using why?and forwhom? andhow much?
    • 94. IBM Enterprise Content Strategy & Content Experience 94 @aames #LavaCon Building a business caseStep 4: Provide justification Let your audience see how you arrived at this solution: Describe all viable/meaningful alternatives (including doing nothing) Use your metrics plan to evaluate each option Calculate ROI (where you can): amount returned / costs Estimate how long it will take to see those returns on investment Identify any risks and communicate a plan to mitigate those risks Specify why you selected your approach over alternative options
    • 95. IBM Enterprise Content Strategy & Content Experience 95 @aames #LavaCon Building a business caseStep 5: Identify the team Who do you need in order to achieve your vision? Leaders of the project? Sponsors? Stakeholders? What skills do you need? Leadership/strategy/vision Project management Technical End-to-end information experience skills Information development skills Etc. Make a clear and concise request for resources, and be sure that these resources have been accounted for in your cost assessments
    • 96. IBM Enterprise Content Strategy & Content Experience 96 @aames #LavaCon Part 4: Complete! Upon completing this analysis, you now have: – An expectations matrix to help you manage your stakeholders – A complete, robust business case to use to communicate and sell your strategy to sponsors and stakeholders
    • 97. IBM Enterprise Content Strategy & Content Experience 97 @aames #LavaCon Wrap up Themes
    • 98. IBM Enterprise Content Strategy & Content Experience 98 @aames #LavaCon Themes from today’s session 1. The importance of systems thinking—analyze and strategize at the ecosystem- level 2. The importance of metrics—tell the right story in the right way to the right people 3. The value of knowing who you are—play to your strengths 4. The value of knowing who influences your success—identify the real decision-makers 5. The importance of soft skills—communication, evangelism, assertive outreach, networking, breaking down barriers 6. The critical role that communityplays in your success—managing your stakeholders, building relationships with key players in your content ecosystem 7. The wisdom of crawl-walk-run—don’t boil the ocean, but rather envision the run phase, start with crawl, and plan for walk 8. The critical importance of audience analysis—every phase of the content strategy process, every deliverable, every communication
    • 99. IBM Enterprise Content Strategy & Content Experience 99 @aames #LavaCon The whole thing: Complete! …now you’re ready to go forth and conquer! Upon completing this work, you now have: Perspective and skills in analyzing the today-state Perspective and skills in using the right metrics effectively Perspective and skills in building a business case Perspective and skills in creating a compelling, effective communication plan to evangelize your vision A good time at LavaConto cherish in memory (or so I hope!)
    • 100. IBM Enterprise Content Strategy & Content Experience 100 @aames #LavaCon References
    • 101. IBM Enterprise Content Strategy & Content Experience 101 @aames #LavaCon References Ames, Andrea and Alyson Riley. “Strategic information architecture: The information user experience.” Intercom (October 2012). 28-32. Bhapkar, Neil. 8 KPIs Your Content Marketing Measurements Should Include. Content Marketing Institute. Web. 12 April 2013. http://bit.ly/Wnb7Cy Carliner, Saul. Ten tips for building a business case. Intercom (June 2012). Checkland, Peter. Systems Thinking, Systems Practice. 1999. Ecology, Mind, & Systems: ecomind.wikidot.com Ellerby, Lindsay. Analysis, plus synthesis: Turning data into insights. UX Matters (27 April 2009). Web. 12 April 2013. http://bit.ly/C2vQ6 Ellis, David. (1989). A behaviouralmodel for information retrieval system design. Journal of information science, 15 (4/5): 237-247. Johnson, Steve. Writing the market requirements document. Pragmatic Marketing. Web. 12 April 2013. http://bit.ly/SiTrF2 Kalbach, James. “Designing for Information Foragers: A Behavioral Model for Information Seeking on the World Wide Web.” Internetworking, Internet Technical Group newsletter. Web. 20 April 2013. http://bit.ly/11Ryc15
    • 102. IBM Enterprise Content Strategy & Content Experience 102 @aames #LavaCon References Kalbach, James and Aaron Gustafson. Designing Web Navigation: Optimizing the User Experience. Cambridge: MA: O’Reilly Media, 2007. Klipfolio. The KPI Dashboard—Evolved. Web. 12 April 2013. http://bit.ly/LhzeL9 Molisani, Jack. How to build a business case. Intercom (July/August 2008). Muldoon, Pamela. 4 metrics every content marketer needs to measure: Interview with Jay Baer. Content Marketing Institute. Web. 12 April 2013. http://bit.ly/X8IvMJ Plowman, Kerry J. Five pitfalls of requirement writing. Pragmatic Marketing. Web. 12 April 2013. http://bit.ly/RWKbUY Sehlhorst, Scott. Writing good requirements—the big ten rules. Tyner Blain blog. Web. 12 April 2013. http://bit.ly/13Y7t0 Thompson, Rachel. Stakeholder management: Planning stakeholder communication. MindTools. Web. 12 April 2013. http://bit.ly/8UnUdj Wheeler, Benjamin, Gilda Wheeler, and Wendy Church. It's All Connected: A Comprehensive Guide to Global Issues and Sustainable Solutions: www.facingthefuture.org
    • 103. IBM Enterprise Content Strategy & Content Experience 103 @aames #LavaCon andreaames(@aames) thank you