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Women in the military
 

Women in the military

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    Women in the military Women in the military Presentation Transcript

    • Women in the Military
    • Overview • History of contributions of women in the military • Women’s Armed Services Integration Act of 1948 (WASIA) • Contemporary issues • Strategies to effect the full integration of women FLW EO Office 2
    • Historical Contributions • Revolutionary War • Civil War • W.W.I • W.W.II FLW EO Office 3
    • The Women’s Armed Integration Act (WASIA) • Women under 18 couldn't enlist, if less the 21 , required parents consent • Husbands of military women had to prove dependency • Enlisted women could not exceed 2% of enlisted strength. Female Officers, excluding nurse, could not exceed 10% of total female enlisted strength • Officers could not progress beyond O-5 unless appointed Director of Women in their service. Then their attain O-6, however if reassigned, they reverted back to O-5. FLW EO Office 4
    • The Women’s Armed Integration Act (WASIA) • No women could serve in command positions. Women could hold supervisory positions over women only • Army had no provision prohibiting combat. The Secretary of the Army could assign as needed FLW EO Office 5
    • Defense Advisory Committee on Women In The Service (DACOWITS) • To Advise on all matters pertaining to women in take military • To interpret to the public the need for and roles of women in the military and to promote public acceptance of the military as a career for women FLW EO Office 6
    • Public Law 90-130 • Men and women can enlist at 18 without parental consent • Changed proof of dependency • Allow women to request waivers to stay in the service. In 1975, DoD allowed pregnant women to remain in the military unless they asked to get out • Two percent ceiling removed and could be appoint generals FLW EO Office 7
    • Public Law 90-130 • Women could participate in ROTC programs and military academies • Women could serve aboard ships • Women could participate in Aviation • Women could serve in all but direct combatrelated MOSs FLW EO Office 8
    • Vietnam • Mostly served as nurses • 1964, four nurses received Purple Hearts • Eight women are enshrined on the Vietnam Memorial • VA did not recognize female veterans suffering from Post Traumatic Stress Disorder until 1982 FLW EO Office 9
    • Post Vietnam • • • • • • FLW EO Office Oct-78 - Public Law 95-485 ERA Grenada Attack on Libya Operation Just Cause Operation Desert Storm 10
    • Contemporary Issues • Congress eliminated the combat exclusion law in 1993 • Repealed the laws prohibiting women from becoming combat pilots • On October 1, 1994, the Army opened 32,00 ground jobs to women • Army’s most senior leaders are drawn from branches closed to women • Kara Hultgreen-Navy Tomcat pilot • Gender Integrated Training (GIT) • Medical issues and absences FLW EO Office 11
    • Overview • History of contributions of women in the military • Women’s Armed Services Integration Act of 1948 (WASIA) • Contemporary issues • Strategies to effect the full integration of women FLW EO Office 12