Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
9akk105151d0113 5 whys
9akk105151d0113 5 whys
9akk105151d0113 5 whys
9akk105151d0113 5 whys
9akk105151d0113 5 whys
9akk105151d0113 5 whys
9akk105151d0113 5 whys
9akk105151d0113 5 whys
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

9akk105151d0113 5 whys

259

Published on

Published in: Health & Medicine, Business
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
259
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
16
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. ABB Basic Quality Tools Series 5 Whys Basic technique for finding root causes © ABB Group 9AKK105151D0113 15 July 2010, Slide 1
  • 2. 5 Why’s - Content What is it for? • A quick and simple tool for understanding the real root causes of a problem • To push thinking about potential root causes to the root level. Where could I use it? • In the Q2 Analyze phase of an improvement project to understand root causes. • Where a quick tool is required for understanding cause and effect in the field. • Can be used in conjunction with a Fishbone diagram to understand more “bones”. How do I use it? • • • • • Establish the problem – write it down Ask Why the problem is happening –write it down. Ask Why again (to the last answer) and write it down. Keep asking Why until the real root cause is identified. This may take more or less than 5 Whys Risks and how to avoid them Example © ABB Group 9AKK105151D0113 15 July 2010, Slide 2 Why? .Why? ..Why? .. .Why? ... .Why?
  • 3. 5 Why’s - What is it for? Uses of this tool: • As a simple tool that can be used at the problem location to challenge potential root causes . • It can be used together with a Fishbone / Ishikawa diagram to establish more bones. • It can be used in a team to thoroughly interrogate root causes. Expected Benefits: • By continually asking Why? The process encourages a more rigorous investigation of the real root cause. It avoids the temptation to stick with the first answer given. © ABB Group 9AKK105151D0113 15 July 2010, Slide 3
  • 4. 5 Whys - Where could I use it? Background: Uses: • Potential root causes require in depth interrogation. Often the initial root causes proposed are not the real root causes. • Use it to identify root causes for problems which are not clear and may have a deeper real cause. • The 5 Why’s technique pushes and tests the understanding of root causes and avoids superficial causes being accepted. © ABB Group 9AKK105151D0113 15 July 2010, Slide 4 • Use it during the analysis phase to gain a deeper understanding of root cause by pushing understanding of potential root causes.
  • 5. 5 Whys - How do I use it? Procedure and Guidance Notes: • Clarify the problem and write it down It is important that there is clear understanding of the problem before 5 Whys is started. • Ask Why the problem happens (Why 1) Write down the potential cause It can be good practice to use in conjunction with a Fishbone diagram. Ask Why a each “bone.” State the problem Ask Why the problem happens • • Ask Why the problem happens • For the potential cause or outcome identified, ask why it happens (Why 2) Write down this next potential root cause. • For the next potential root cause or outcome, again ask why it happens (Why 3) Write down the new potential root cause Repeat the process until the real root cause is identified. • Record the actual root cause identified. • Keep asking Why Record Root Cause • © ABB Group 9AKK105151D0113 15 July 2010, Slide 5 There is no magical formula about 5 Whys’ Sometimes you may get to the root cause after two or three whys, sometimes you my have to ask more than five times. Stop when you have reached a root cause that the team agree and can act on.
  • 6. 5 Whys - Risks and how to avoid them: Risks : Steps to avoid them : • Not asking Why enough times can lead to a superficial root cause. • Ensure that the process is repeated enough times until the team is happy that a good potential root cause has been identified. © ABB Group 9AKK105151D0113 15 July 2010, Slide 6
  • 7. 5 Whys - Example 1 Q : WHY has machine stopped ? A : Overload tripped out 2 Q : WHY overload trip ? A : Insufficient oil on shaft 4 Q : WHY is pump not efficient ? A : Pump drive shaft worn © ABB Group 9AKK105151D0113 15 July 2010, Slide 7 3 Q : WHY Insufficient oil ? A : Oil pump is inefficient 5 Q : WHY is the pump shaft worn ? A : Oil filter is blocked by metal scrap
  • 8. 5 Whys - Example 1. Define the problem Write down the problem being investigated Flashover during High Voltage Test on MV Transformer 1 Because the bushing socket was loose 2 Because the lock washer for the spring plate was not installed properly 2. Identify potential root cause (Why 1) Consider the potential root cause of the problem ( can be done in conjunction with a fishbone diagram) 3 Because the workman could not fit it in place and left it ou – and did not tell anyone! 4 Because the spring plate was made too thick 3. Write down potential root cause 5 Because the subcontractor made a mistake when transferring the dimensions from the drawing to the CNC program 4. Identify potential root cause (Why 2)s 6 Because XXABB sent drawings, not CAD files to subcontractors Ask Why does the outcome (Why 1) occur? (why 2)  5. Write down potential root cause Continue to ask Why does the previous outcome occur until you’ve reached potential root cause. Which you can record 6. Record the root cause © ABB Group 9AKK105151D0113 15 July 2010, Slide 8 Sustain Solution: Send CAD files instead of drawings. Change work procedure and meet with all sub-contractors affected by change

×