Digital Photography Basics with Jason Barnette

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Digital Photography Basics with Jason Barnette

  1. 1. What is Photography?Jason BarnettePhotojournalist and Travel Photographer
  2. 2. Photography Basics What makes a great photo?  It tells a story  It has meaning  It is powerful  It is unique
  3. 3. Photography Basics
  4. 4. Photography Basics
  5. 5. Photography Basics
  6. 6. Photography Basics
  7. 7. Photography Basics Composition and framing
  8. 8. Photography Basics Composition and framing  Use the space wisely
  9. 9. Photography Basics Composition and framing  Use the space wisely  Keep the camera level
  10. 10. Photography Basics Composition and framing  Use the space wisely  Keep the camera level  Make sure you draw attention to subject of photo
  11. 11. Photography Basics Rule of Thirds
  12. 12. Photography Basics Rule of Thirds  Divide a photo into thirds both horizontally and vertically
  13. 13. Photography Basics Rule of Thirds  Divide a photo into thirds both horizontally and vertically  Horizon line should be on one of the horizontal lines
  14. 14. Photography Basics Rule of Thirds  Divide a photo into thirds both horizontally and vertically  Horizon line should be on one of the horizontal lines  Place main subject in either 1/3 or 2/3 of the frame
  15. 15. Photography Basics Rule of Thirds  Divide a photo into thirds both horizontally and vertically  Horizon line should be on one of the horizontal lines  Place main subject in either 1/3 or 2/3 of the frame  Use “sweet spots” for perfect placement
  16. 16. Photography Basics
  17. 17. How to Choose Camera Equipment Camera Bodies
  18. 18. How to Choose Camera Equipment Camera Bodies Lenses
  19. 19. How to Choose Camera Equipment Camera Bodies Lenses Lighting (Strobes)
  20. 20. How to Choose Camera Equipment Camera Bodies Lenses Lighting (Strobes) Accessories
  21. 21. How to Choose Camera Equipment Camera Bodies - Types  Cellphones  Point & Shoot  DSLR (Digital Single Lens Reflex)  Medium Format  Large Format
  22. 22. How to Choose Camera Equipment Camera Bodies – Brand Names  Nikon  Canon  Pentax  Sigma  Olympus  Sony
  23. 23. How to Choose Camera Equipment Camera Bodies – What to Look For  Fully manual controls  Uses something other than AA batteries  Uses CF or SD memory cards  Replaceable lenses  Resolution is irrelevant
  24. 24. How to Choose Camera Equipment Camera Lenses – Types  Fisheye: 10mm or smaller
  25. 25. How to Choose Camera Equipment Camera Lenses – Types  Fisheye: 10mm or smaller  Wide Angle: 10-30mm
  26. 26. How to Choose Camera Equipment Camera Lenses – Types  Fisheye: 10mm or smaller  Wide Angle: 10-30mm  Normal: 35-70mm
  27. 27. How to Choose Camera Equipment Camera Lenses – Types  Fisheye: 10mm or smaller  Wide Angle: 10-30mm  Normal: 35-70mm  Telephoto: 85-200mm
  28. 28. How to Choose Camera Equipment Camera Lenses – Types  Fisheye: 10mm or smaller  Wide Angle: 10-30mm  Normal: 35-70mm  Telephoto: 85-200mm  Supertelephoto: 200-600mm
  29. 29. How to Choose Camera Equipment
  30. 30. How to Choose Camera Equipment
  31. 31. How to Choose Camera Equipment
  32. 32. How to Choose Camera Equipment
  33. 33. How to Choose Camera Equipment Camera Lenses – Prime vs. Zoom
  34. 34. How to Choose Camera Equipment Camera Lenses – Prime vs. Zoom  Prime lenses use a single focal length
  35. 35. How to Choose Camera Equipment Camera Lenses – Prime vs. Zoom  Prime lenses use a single focal length  Zoom lenses can vary greatly or only slightly
  36. 36. How to Choose Camera Equipment Camera Lenses – Prime vs. Zoom  Prime lenses use a single focal length  Zoom lenses can vary greatly or only slightly  Prime lenses are sharper, lighter, cheaper
  37. 37. How to Choose Camera Equipment Camera Lenses – Prime vs. Zoom  Prime lenses use a single focal length  Zoom lenses can vary greatly or only slightly  Prime lenses are sharper, lighter, cheaper  Prime lenses are often the better choice for portraits, landscapes, products, and marketing
  38. 38. How to Choose Camera Equipment Camera Lenses – Prime vs. Zoom  Prime lenses use a single focal length  Zoom lenses can vary greatly or only slightly  Prime lenses are sharper, lighter, cheaper  Prime lenses are often the better choice for portraits, landscapes, products, and marketing  Zoom lenses are heavier, more expensive, more easily broken
  39. 39. How to Choose Camera Equipment Camera Lenses – Prime vs. Zoom  Prime lenses use a single focal length  Zoom lenses can vary greatly or only slightly  Prime lenses are sharper, lighter, cheaper  Prime lenses are often the better choice for portraits, landscapes, products, and marketing  Zoom lenses are heavier, more expensive, more easily broken  Zoom lenses are better for sports, editorial
  40. 40. How to Choose Camera Equipment Camera Lenses – Fixed Aperture vs. Variable Aperture
  41. 41. How to Choose Camera Equipment Camera Lenses – Fixed Aperture vs. Variable Aperture  Cheaper lenses = variable maximum aperture
  42. 42. How to Choose Camera Equipment Camera Lenses – Fixed Aperture vs. Variable Aperture  Cheaper lenses = variable maximum aperture  Better lenses = fixed maximum aperture
  43. 43. How to Choose Camera Equipment Camera Lenses – Tips on Buying and Using
  44. 44. How to Choose Camera Equipment Camera Lenses – Tips on Buying and Using  Get the right lens for the job
  45. 45. How to Choose Camera Equipment Camera Lenses – Tips on Buying and Using  Get the right lens for the job  Wide angle for tight spaces and large groups
  46. 46. How to Choose Camera Equipment Camera Lenses – Tips on Buying and Using  Get the right lens for the job  Wide angle for tight spaces and large groups  Normal range for individual portraits and most common
  47. 47. How to Choose Camera Equipment Camera Lenses – Tips on Buying and Using  Get the right lens for the job  Wide angle for tight spaces and large groups  Normal range for individual portraits and most common  Telephoto for sports and wildlife
  48. 48. How to Choose Camera Equipment Camera Lenses – Tips on Buying and Using  Get the right lens for the job  Wide angle for tight spaces and large groups  Normal range for individual portraits and most common  Telephoto for sports and wildlife  If you can be flexible during shoots, go with primes
  49. 49. How to Choose Camera Equipment Camera Lenses – Tips on Buying and Using  Get the right lens for the job  Wide angle for tight spaces and large groups  Normal range for individual portraits and most common  Telephoto for sports and wildlife  If you can be flexible during shoots, go with primes  If you don’t have much money to spend, buy one or two zooms (worth three primes)
  50. 50. How to Choose Camera Equipment Camera Lenses – Tips on Buying and Using  Get the right lens for the job  Wide angle for tight spaces and large groups  Normal range for individual portraits and most common  Telephoto for sports and wildlife  If you can be flexible during shoots, go with primes  If you don’t have much money to spend, buy one or two zooms (worth three primes)  Start with 50mm prime
  51. 51. How to Choose Camera Equipment Camera Lenses – Tips on Buying and Using  Get the right lens for the job  Wide angle for tight spaces and large groups  Normal range for individual portraits and most common  Telephoto for sports and wildlife  If you can be flexible during shoots, go with primes  If you don’t have much money to spend, buy one or two zooms (worth three primes)  Start with 50mm prime  Have at least one lens with an aperture of f/1.8 or f/1.4
  52. 52. How to Choose Camera Equipment Lighting (Strobes)  Internal flashes are weak, narrow, consume battery power
  53. 53. How to Choose Camera Equipment Lighting (Strobes)  Internal flashes are weak, narrow, consume battery power  External flashes, also known as Strobes, are more commonly used
  54. 54. How to Choose Camera Equipment
  55. 55. How to Choose Camera Equipment Lighting (Strobes)  Internal flashes are weak, narrow, consume battery power  External flashes, also known as Strobes, are more commonly used  Light modification kits, bounce boards, diffusers
  56. 56. How to Choose Camera Equipment Lighting (Strobes)  Internal flashes are weak, narrow, consume battery power  External flashes, also known as Strobes, are more commonly used  Light modification kits, bounce boards, diffusers  Remotes, such as Pocket Wizards, help fire strobes remotely, but are not required
  57. 57. How to Choose Camera Equipment Lighting (Strobes)  Internal flashes are weak, narrow, consume battery power  External flashes, also known as Strobes, are more commonly used  Light modification kits, bounce boards, diffusers  Remotes, such as Pocket Wizards, help fire strobes remotely, but are not required  Light stands, clamps, special adaptors
  58. 58. How to Choose Camera Equipment Accessories
  59. 59. How to Choose Camera Equipment Accessories  Bags, cases, protection
  60. 60. How to Choose Camera Equipment Accessories  Bags, cases, protection  Tripod, monopod
  61. 61. How to Choose Camera Equipment Accessories  Bags, cases, protection  Tripod, monopod  Filters (UV, CPL, ND)
  62. 62. How to Choose Camera Equipment
  63. 63. How to Choose Camera Equipment
  64. 64. How to Choose Camera Equipment Accessories  Bags, cases, protection  Tripod, monopod  Filters (UV, CPL, ND)  Remotes
  65. 65. How to Choose Camera Equipment Accessories  Bags, cases, protection  Tripod, monopod  Filters (UV, CPL, ND)  Remotes  Sensor and lens cleaning
  66. 66. Camera Basics Camera Basics – Aperture
  67. 67. Camera Basics Camera Basics – Aperture  Aperture determines how much light enters the camera body through the lens
  68. 68. Camera Basics Camera Basics – Aperture  Aperture determines how much light enters the camera body through the lens  Uses a scale called the F-Scale and looks like f/5.6
  69. 69. Camera Basics Camera Basics – Aperture  Aperture determines how much light enters the camera body through the lens  Uses a scale called the F-Scale and looks like f/5.6  The larger the aperture, the smaller the number
  70. 70. Camera Basics Camera Basics – Aperture  Aperture determines how much light enters the camera body through the lens  Uses a scale called the F-Scale and looks like f/5.6  The larger the aperture, the smaller the number  The smaller the aperture (larger the number) the more limited the Depth of Field
  71. 71. Camera Basics Camera Basics – Exposure (Shutter Speed)
  72. 72. Camera Basics Camera Basics – Exposure (Shutter Speed)  Exposure is the amount of time the sensor is exposed to light
  73. 73. Camera Basics Camera Basics – Exposure (Shutter Speed)  Exposure is the amount of time the sensor is exposed to light  Minimum exposure times are required for different situations
  74. 74. Camera Basics Camera Basics – Exposure (Shutter Speed)  Exposure is the amount of time the sensor is exposed to light  Minimum exposure times are required for different situations  Human action: 1/125
  75. 75. Camera Basics Camera Basics – Exposure (Shutter Speed)  Exposure is the amount of time the sensor is exposed to light  Minimum exposure times are required for different situations  Human action: 1/125  Sports: 1/1000-1/2000
  76. 76. Camera Basics Camera Basics – Exposure (Shutter Speed)  Exposure is the amount of time the sensor is exposed to light  Minimum exposure times are required for different situations  Human action: 1/125  Sports: 1/1000-1/2000  Wildlife: 1/500
  77. 77. Camera Basics Camera Basics – Exposure (Shutter Speed)  Exposure is the amount of time the sensor is exposed to light  Minimum exposure times are required for different situations  Human action: 1/125  Sports: 1/1000-1/2000  Wildlife: 1/500  General rule for exposure: shutter speed should be faster than 1 / focal length
  78. 78. Camera Basics Camera Basics – ISO
  79. 79. Camera Basics Camera Basics – ISO  ISO determines how sensitive your sensor is to light
  80. 80. Camera Basics Camera Basics – ISO  ISO determines how sensitive your sensor is to light  Similar to ASA during days of film
  81. 81. Camera Basics Camera Basics – ISO  ISO determines how sensitive your sensor is to light  Similar to ASA during days of film  Lower the ISO, the less sensitive (requires more light)
  82. 82. Camera Basics Camera Basics – ISO  ISO determines how sensitive your sensor is to light  Similar to ASA during days of film  Lower the ISO, the less sensitive (requires more light)  Typical ISO settings:
  83. 83. Camera Basics Camera Basics – ISO  ISO determines how sensitive your sensor is to light  Similar to ASA during days of film  Lower the ISO, the less sensitive (requires more light)  Typical ISO settings:  100 ISO = Sunny days
  84. 84. Camera Basics Camera Basics – ISO  ISO determines how sensitive your sensor is to light  Similar to ASA during days of film  Lower the ISO, the less sensitive (requires more light)  Typical ISO settings:  100 ISO = Sunny days  400 ISO = Cloudy days/indoor with strobe/portraits
  85. 85. Camera Basics Camera Basics – ISO  ISO determines how sensitive your sensor is to light  Similar to ASA during days of film  Lower the ISO, the less sensitive (requires more light)  Typical ISO settings:  100 ISO = Sunny days  400 ISO = Cloudy days/indoor with strobe/portraits  800 ISO = Pre-Dawn, post-dusk, very low light situations
  86. 86. Camera Basics Camera Basics – ISO  ISO determines how sensitive your sensor is to light  Similar to ASA during days of film  Lower the ISO, the less sensitive (requires more light)  Typical ISO settings:  100 ISO = Sunny days  400 ISO = Cloudy days/indoor with strobe/portraits  800 ISO = Pre-Dawn, post-dusk, very low light situations  1600 ISO = Indoor sports
  87. 87. Camera Basics Camera Basics – White Balance
  88. 88. Camera Basics Camera Basics – White Balance  Determines what is white depending on color temperature
  89. 89. Camera Basics Camera Basics – White Balance  Determines what is white depending on color temperature  Most cameras have about 7 pre-set settings
  90. 90. Camera Basics Camera Basics – White Balance  Determines what is white depending on color temperature  Most cameras have about 7 pre-set settings  An incorrect white balance can ruin a photo, but can be corrected with editing software
  91. 91. Photography Law Photography Law - Copyright
  92. 92. Photography Law Photography Law – Copyright  A photograph is automatically protected the moment it is created
  93. 93. Photography Law Photography Law – Copyright  A photograph is automatically protected the moment it is created  You can register photos, but not necessary
  94. 94. Photography Law Photography Law – Copyright  A photograph is automatically protected the moment it is created  You can register photos, but not necessary  U.S. Copyright Office suggests you add the following to all appearances of your photo: Copyright Symbol + Name + Date taken
  95. 95. Photography Law Photography Law – Copyright  A photograph is automatically protected the moment it is created  You can register photos, but not necessary  U.S. Copyright Office suggests you add the following to all appearances of your photo: Copyright Symbol + Date Taken+ Name  Example: © 2011 Jason Barnette
  96. 96. Photography Law Photography Law - Releases
  97. 97. Photography Law Photography Law - Releases  Only required when shooting individual or group portraits, children, or on private property
  98. 98. Photography Law Photography Law - Releases  Only required when shooting individual or group portraits, children, or on private property  Not required for shooting on public property, including streets, sidewalks, parks, beaches, and any government- owned and operated property
  99. 99. Photography Law Photography Law - Releases  Only required when shooting individual or group portraits, children, or on private property  Not required for shooting on public property, including streets, sidewalks, parks, beaches, and any government- owned and operated property  Also not required if photos are used for editorial, educational, or non-profit uses
  100. 100. Photography Law Photography Law - Releases  Only required when shooting individual or group portraits, children, or on private property  Not required for shooting on public property, including streets, sidewalks, parks, beaches, and any government- owned and operated property  Also not required if photos are used for editorial, educational, or non-profit uses  You do not need a release as long as the person has no reasonable expectation of privacy
  101. 101. Photography Law Photography Law – Your Rights
  102. 102. Photography Law Photography Law – Your Rights  You have the right to shoot any photo on public property
  103. 103. Photography Law Photography Law – Your Rights  You have the right to shoot any photo on public property  You can shoot any person on public property
  104. 104. Photography Law Photography Law – Your Rights  You have the right to shoot any photo on public property  You can shoot any person on public property  You do not have to surrender yourself or camera gear to any individual or police officer on public property
  105. 105. Capturing Great Photos Capturing Emotion
  106. 106. Capturing Great Photos Capturing Emotion  Spontaneous
  107. 107. Capturing Great Photos
  108. 108. Capturing Great Photos Capturing Emotion  Spontaneous  Better with a long lens from a distance
  109. 109. Capturing Great Photos Capturing Emotion  Spontaneous  Better with a long lens from a distance  Be gentle, respectful, and use good judgement
  110. 110. Capturing Great Photos Capturing Emotion  Spontaneous  Better with a long lens from a distance  Be gentle, respectful, and use good judgement  Don’t draw attention to yourself
  111. 111. Capturing Great Photos Capturing Emotion  Spontaneous  Better with a long lens from a distance  Be gentle, respectful, and use good judgement  Don’t draw attention to yourself  Mimic the emotions you are capturing
  112. 112. Capturing Great Photos
  113. 113. Capturing Great Photos Telling a Story
  114. 114. Capturing Great Photos Telling a Story  ALL photography is about telling a story
  115. 115. Capturing Great Photos
  116. 116. Capturing Great Photos Telling a Story  ALL photography is about telling a story  Stories have characters, mood, setting, time of day or year
  117. 117. Capturing Great Photos Telling a Story  ALL photography is about telling a story  Stories have characters, mood, setting, time of day or year  Use the environment to tell the story rather than words
  118. 118. Capturing Great Photos Telling a Story  ALL photography is about telling a story  Stories have characters, mood, setting, time of day or year  Use the environment to tell the story rather than words  A great story-telling photo does not need a caption
  119. 119. Capturing Great Photos Photojournalism
  120. 120. Capturing Great Photos Photojournalism  Photojournalism is the art of telling a story with photos instead of words
  121. 121. Capturing Great Photos Photojournalism  Photojournalism is the art of telling a story with photos instead of words  If you can use an action verb to describe a photo, it is photojournalism
  122. 122. Capturing Great Photos Photojournalism  Photojournalism is the art of telling a story with photos instead of words  If you can use an action verb to describe a photo, it is photojournalism  All photos should tell a story, regardless of purpose or intent
  123. 123. Capturing Great Photos
  124. 124. Capturing Great Photos Position
  125. 125. Capturing Great Photos Position  Forget eye-height and experiment
  126. 126. Capturing Great Photos Position  Forget eye-height and experiment  Different positions suggest different moods
  127. 127. Capturing Great Photos Position  Forget eye-height and experiment  Different positions suggest different moods  Standing higher, looking down suggests the subject is small, weak, powerless
  128. 128. Capturing Great Photos Position  Forget eye-height and experiment  Different positions suggest different moods  Standing higher, looking down suggests the subject is small, weak, powerless  Sitting low, looking up suggest the subject is larger than life, dominating, powerful
  129. 129. Capturing Great Photos Position  Forget eye-height and experiment  Different positions suggest different moods  Standing higher, looking down suggests the subject is small, weak, powerless  Sitting low, looking up suggest the subject is larger than life, dominating, powerful  Canted angles should almost always be avoided
  130. 130. Capturing Great Photos
  131. 131. Capturing Great Photos Working with the Greatest Light Source: The Sun
  132. 132. Capturing Great Photos Working with the Greatest Light Source: The Sun  #1 problem in amateur photography: fighting the sun
  133. 133. Capturing Great Photos Working with the Greatest Light Source: The Sun  #1 problem in amateur photography: fighting the sun  Best hours of day to shoot outside: 3 hours after sunrise, 3 hours before sunset
  134. 134. Capturing Great Photos Working with the Greatest Light Source: The Sun  #1 problem in amateur photography: fighting the sun  Best hours of day to shoot outside: 3 hours after sunrise, 3 hours before sunset  Always place sun behind you
  135. 135. Capturing Great Photos Working with the Greatest Light Source: The Sun  #1 problem in amateur photography: fighting the sun  Best hours of day to shoot outside: 3 hours after sunrise, 3 hours before sunset  Always place sun behind you  The sun changes position and inclination in the sky depending on time of year
  136. 136. Capturing Great Photos Working with the Greatest Light Source: The Sun  #1 problem in amateur photography: fighting the sun  Best hours of day to shoot outside: 3 hours after sunrise, 3 hours before sunset  Always place sun behind you  The sun changes position and inclination in the sky depending on time of year  Use an almanac or online sun plotter to determine angle and position of sun
  137. 137. Capturing Great Photos Working with the Greatest Light Source: The Sun  #1 problem in amateur photography: fighting the sun  Best hours of day to shoot outside: 3 hours after sunrise, 3 hours before sunset  Always place sun behind you  The sun changes position and inclination in the sky depending on time of year  Use an almanac or online sun plotter to determine angle and position of sun  Sometimes, waiting on the sun is the most important part
  138. 138. Capturing Great Photos
  139. 139. Amateur vs. Professional A professional is simply someone who earns a living primarily from photography
  140. 140. Amateur vs. Professional A professional is simply someone who earns a living primarily from photography A professional can do something an amateur cannot
  141. 141. Amateur vs. Professional A professional is simply someone who earns a living primarily from photography A professional can do something an amateur cannot A professional knows how to handle all situations
  142. 142. Amateur vs. Professional A professional is simply someone who earns a living primarily from photography A professional can do something an amateur cannot A professional knows how to handle all situations A professional is also a businessperson
  143. 143. Capturing Great Photos
  144. 144. 5 Rules for a Great Photographer Never Set the Camera Down
  145. 145. 5 Rules for a Great Photographer Never Set the Camera Down Never Draw Attention to Yourself
  146. 146. 5 Rules for a Great Photographer Never Set the Camera Down Never Draw Attention to Yourself Don’t Become Part of the Story
  147. 147. 5 Rules for a Great Photographer Never Set the Camera Down Never Draw Attention to Yourself Don’t Become Part of the Story Always Charge Your Batteries
  148. 148. 5 Rules for a Great Photographer Never Set the Camera Down Never Draw Attention to Yourself Don’t Become Part of the Story Always Charge Your Batteries Be Prepared for Anything

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