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  • 1. NETWORK TOPOLOGY
  • 2.
    • PHYSICAL TOPOLOGY
    • What is a Topology?
    • Network topology defines the structure of the network.
    • One part of the topology definition is the physical topology,
    • which is the actual layout of the wire or media.
    • The other part is the logical topology, which defines how the
    • media is accessed by the hosts for sending data.
    • The following sections discuss the physical topologies used
    • in networks.
  • 3. TYPES OF PHYSICAL TOPOLOGIES
    • BUS TOPOLOGY
    • RING TOPOLOGY
    • STAR TOPOLOGY
    • MESH TREE TOPOLOGY
    • EXTENDED STAR TOPOLOGY
    • HIERARCHIAL TOPLOGY
  • 4. TYPES OF PHYSICAL TOPOLOGIES
  • 5. BUS TOPOLOGY A bus topology uses a single backbone cable that is terminated at both ends. All the hosts connect directly to this backbone.
  • 6.
    • A bus topology consists of a main run of cable with a
    • terminator at each end.
    • All nodes (file server, workstations, and peripherals) are
    • connected to the linear cable.
    • Ethernet and Local Talk networks use a linear bus topology.
    BUS TOPOLOGY
  • 7.
    • COMPONENTS REQUIRED FOR BUS TOPOLOGY:
    • CO-AXIAL CABLE
    • BNC CONNECTOR
    • T-CONNECTOR
    • TERMINATE RESISITOR
    • ETHERNET CARD
    • Terminate Resistor - A device that provides electrical
    • resistance at the end of a transmission line. Its function
    • is to absorb signals on the line, thereby keeping them
    • from bouncing back and being received again by the network.
  • 8.
    • Advantages of a Bus Topology
    • Easy to connect a computer or peripheral to a bus Topology.
    • Requires less cable length than a star topology.
    • Disadvantages of a Bus Topology
    • Entire network shuts down if there is a break in the main cable.
    • Terminators are required at both ends of the backbone cable.
    • Difficult to identify the problem if the entire network shuts down.
    • Not meant to be used as a stand-alone solution in a large
    • building.
  • 9. RING TOPOLOGY A ring topology connects one host to the next and the last host to the first. This creates a physical ring of cable.
  • 10.
    • A bus topology consists of a main run of cable with a
    • terminator at each end.
    • All nodes (file server, workstations, and peripherals) are
    • connected to the linear cable.
    • Ethernet and Local Talk networks use a linear bus topology.
    RING TOPOLOGY
  • 11.
    • COMPONENTS REQUIRED FOR RING TOPOLOGY:
    • CO-AXIAL CABLE
    • BNC CONNECTOR
    • T-CONNECTOR
    • ETHERNET CARD
  • 12.
    • Advantages of a Ring Topology
    • Easy to connect a computer or peripheral to a bus Topology.
    • Requires less cable length than a star topology.
    • Disadvantages of a Ring Topology
    • Entire network shuts down if there is a break in the main cable.
    • Terminators are required at both ends of the backbone cable.
    • Difficult to identify the problem if the entire network shuts down.
    • Not meant to be used as a stand-alone solution in a large
    • building.
  • 13. STAR TOPOLOGY A star topology connects all cables to a central point of concentration.  
  • 14. STAR TOPOLOGY
    • A star topology is designed with each node (file server,
    • workstations, and peripherals) connected directly to a
    • central network hub or switch.
    • Data on a star network passes through the hub or switch
    • before continuing to its destination.
    • The hub or switch manages and controls all functions of
    • the network. It also acts as a repeater for the data flow.
    • This configuration is common with twisted pair cable,
    • it can also be used with fiber optic cable also.
  • 15. STAR TOPOLOGY
  • 16.
    • COMPONENTS REQUIRED FOR STAR TOPOLOGY:
    • TWISTED PAIR CABLE
    • RJ45 CONNECTOR
    • ETHERNET CATD
    • HUB OR SWITCH
    • Advantages of a Star Topology
    • Easy to install and wire.
    • No disruptions to the network while connecting
    • or removing devices.
    • Easy to detect faults and to remove parts.
  • 17.
    • Disadvantages of a Star Topology
    • Requires more cable length than a bus topology.
    • If the hub or switch fails, nodes attached are disabled.
    • More expensive than bus topologies because of the cost
    • of the concentrators.
    • The protocols used with star configurations are usually
    • Ethernet or Local Talk. Token Ring uses a similar topology
    • called the star-wired ring.
  • 18.
    • MESH / TREE TOPOLOGY
    • A tree topology combines characteristics of linear bus
    • and star topologies. It consists of groups of star-configured
    • workstations connected to a linear bus backbone cable.
    • Tree topologies allow for the expansion of an existing
    • network and enable schools to configure a network to
    • meet their needs.
  • 19.  
  • 20.
    • Advantages of a Mesh / Tree Topology
    • Point-to-point wiring for individual segments.
    • Supported by several hardware and software venders.
    • Disadvantages of a Mesh / Tree Topology
    • Overall length of each segment is limited by the type of
    • cabling used.
    • If the backbone line breaks, the entire segment goes down.
    • More difficult to configure and wire than other topologies.
  • 21. Extended Star Topology An extended star topology links individual stars together by connecting the hubs and/or switches.This topology can extend the scope and coverage of the network.
  • 22. Hierarchical Topology A hierarchical topology is similar to an extended star.
  • 23.
    • CONSIDERATIONS WHEN CHOOSING A TOPOLOGY
    • Money
    • A linear bus network may be the least expensive
    • way to install a network.
    • 2. Length of cable needed
    • The linear bus network uses shorter lengths of cable.
    • 3. Future growth
    • With a star topology, expanding a network is easily
    • done by adding another concentrator.
    • 4. Cable type
    • The most common cable using in LAN is unshielded
    • twisted pair, which is most often used with star topologies.
  • 24.