Regions in Mindanao
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    Regions in Mindanao Regions in Mindanao Document Transcript

    • REGION X- Northern Mindanao Facts Island group Mindanao Regional center Cagayan de Oro City Area Total :20,132 km2 (7,773 sq mi) Provinces :5 Cities 9 Municipalities 84 Barangays 2,022 Cong. districts 14 Northern Mindanao is a region of the Philippines, designated as Region X. It is composed of five provinces and two cities classified as highly-urbanized, all occupying the north-central part of Mindanao island, and the island-province of Camiguin. The regional center is Cagayan de Oro City. Lanao del North was transferred to Northern Mindanao from Region XII (then called Central Mindanao) by virtue of Executive Order No. 36. Geography and Climate Northern Mindanao has a total land area of 14,032.93 km² of which 6,571 km² is alienable and disposable lands, and the remaining 7,461.99 km². More than 60% of Northern Mindanao's total land area are classified as forest land. Its seas abound with fish and other marine products. Rainfall in Northern Mindanao is evenly distributed throughout the year. Its abundant vegetation, natural springs and high elevation contribute to the region's cool, mild and invigorating climate. The region is composed of five provinces namely Bukidnon, the island province of Camiguin, Lanao del Norte, Misamis Occidental and Misamis Oriental. It also has 2 highly urbanized cities, Cagayan de Oro City and Iligan City. It has seven component cities namely El Salvador City, Gingoog City, Malaybalay City, Oroquieta City, Ozamiz City, Tangub City, and Valencia City. It has 84 municipalities and 2,022 barangays. The regional center is Cagayan de Oro City. Bukidnon Facts Area Total 10,498.59 km2 (4,053.53 sq mi) Area rank 4th out of 80Divisions • Independent cities 0 • Component cities 2 • Municipalities 20 • Barangays 464 • Districts 1st to 4th districts of Bukidnon Bukidnon is a landlocked province of the Philippines located in the Northern Mindanao region. The province borders, clockwise starting from the north, Misamis Oriental, Agusan del Sur, Davao del Norte, Cotabato, Lanao del Sur, and Lanao del Norte The name "Bukidnon" means highlander or mountain dweller. Bukidnon is considered to be the food basket of Mindanao. It is the major producer of rice and corn in the region. Plantations in the province also produce pineapples, bananas and sugarcane.
    • Bukidnon is the home of Mount Dulang-dulang, the 2nd highest mountain in the Philippines with an elevation of 2,938 m located in Kitanglad Mountain Range. Mount Kitanglad(2,899m.), Mount Kalatungan (2,860m.), Mt. Maagnaw (2,742m.), Mt. Lumuluyaw (2,612m.) and Mt. Tuminungan (2,400m.), the 4th, 5th, 8th, 17th and 30th highest mountains in the country respectively, are also found in the province. HISTORY Bukidnon became a part of Misamis in the latter part of 1850. The whole area was then called Malaybalay and the people were known as Bukidnons (highlanders or mountain dwellers). The Philippine Commission, then headed by Commissioner Dean C. Worcester, Secretary of Interior, proposed the separation of Bukidnon from Misamis Province. On August 20, 1907, the Philippine Commission Act No. 1693 was enacted the Province of Agusan and sub- province of Bukidnon. Bukidnon became a regular province on March 10, 1917 by virtue of the creation of the Department of Mindanao and Sulu under Act 2711. In 1942, invading Japanese troops entered Bukidnon. Mt. Capistrano was a civilian evacuation area in the World War II. In 1945, the province was liberated from Japanese occupation by Filipino and American troops with the aid of Bukidnon-based Filipino guerrillas during the Second World War. According to oral history of the indigenous people of Bukidnon, there were four main tribes in Central Mindanao: the Maranao who dwell in Lanao del Sur, and the Maguindanao, Manobo and Talaandig who respectively inhabit the eastern, southern, and north-central portions of the original province of Cotabato. When the civil government divided central Mindanao into provinces at the turn of the 20th century, the groups included in the province of Bukidnon are the Talaandig and the Manobo. The Bisayans, Cebuano, Boholano and Ilonggos migrated into the province followed by various groups from Luzon, namely, the Ilocanos, Batangueños, the Igorots and the Ivatans. All contributed massive acculturation among the indigenous tribes. Most of those who moved to the mountains and forest continued to hold on their ancestors’ cultural heritage. The wide
    • variety of Filipino groups now thrives in the province and contributed immensely in the socio- economic development. GEOGRAPHY Bukidnon is a landlocked plateau in North Central Mindanao. It is bounded on the north by Misamis Oriental and Cagayan de Oro City; on the south by North Cotabato, Davao del Sur and Davao City; on the east by Agusan del Sur and Davao del Norte; and west by Lanao del Sur. Malaybalay City, the capital town, is about 850 km by air from Manila and 91 km by road from Cagayan de Oro City. It has two important landmarks, Mt. Kitanglad and Pulangi River. Mt. Kitanglad is 2,899 m above sea level. Pulangi River, on the other hand, traverses through the northeastern and southern part of the province towards the Rio Grande of Mindanao. Topography Bukidnon is generally characterised as an extensive plateau but the southern and eastern boundaries are mountainous area. The province's average elevation is 915 m above sea level. Two other mountain bodies are found in its southern portion, Mt. Kalatungan and Mt. Tangkulan, which rise to 2, 287 meters and 1, 678 meters, respectively. Gently rolling grassland plateau cut deep and wide canyons of the Cagayan, Pulangi, and Tagoloan Rivers and their tributaries which cover a greater part of the province. • The whole eastern and southern border adjoining the provinces of Agusan, Davao del Norte and Cotabato are covered by lofty and densely forested mountains of the Pantaron Mountain Range (Central Cordillera). The Bukidnon plateau is mainly of volcanic zone consisting of pyroclastic, basaltic and andesitic cones. Bodies of Water A waterfall found within the boundaries of the Kalatungan Mountain Range. Pulangi River The Pulangi River in Brgy. San Jose, Quezon. The Pulangi River, considered the longest river in the province, is a tributary of the Rio Grande of Mindanao. Its headwaters are found in the mountains of Kalabugao, Impasug-ong, Bukidnon. It is the largest as well as the longest river found in the province.
    • It covers the following cities and municipalities of the province: Impasug-ong, Malaybalay City, Cabanglasan, San Fernando, Valencia City, Maramag, Quezon, Don Carlos, Kitaotao, Dangcagan,Kibawe and Damulog. Bukidnon is known as the watershed of Mindanao. It is endowed with six major river systems namely: Pulangi, Tagoloan, Cagayan, Manupali, Muleta, and Bobonawan Rivers. The Tagoloan River has its headwaters in the mountains of Can-ayan, Malaybalay City. It traverses the province northwestward passing through Malaybalay City, Impasug- ong, Sumilao, Manolo Fortich, Malitbog and finally empties into the sea at Tagoloan, Misamis Oriental. The Cagayan River watershed is found mostly in the municipality of Talakag. Its headwaters are found in the Kitanglad Mountain Range in central Bukidnon. The river flows northward through the municipalities of Talakag and Baungon. Its mouth lies at Cagayan de Oro City in Misamis Oriental, where it is the main source of potable water. The Manupali River, a major tributary of the Pulangi River, start in the mountains of Lantapan, Bukidnon, picking up tributaries along the way from the Kalatungan and Kitanglad Mountain Ranges. It forms part of the natural boundary of the Valencia City and Lantapan. It flows eastward towards Malaybalay City, eventually joining the Pulangi River in Valencia City. The Muleta River is found in the southern portion of the province covering the municipalities of Pangantucan, Don Carlos, Kitaotao, Dangcagan, Kibawe, Kadingilan and Damulog. It is another important tributary of the Pulangi River and flows southward. It will join the Pulangi River in the boundary of Bukidnon and Cotabato province. The Bobonawan River, found in the municipality of Cabanglasan, is another tributary of the Pulangi River. It covers most of the parts of the municipality, flowing southward towards Pulangi River. Camuigin "The Island born of fire" Founded 1565 Provincehood June 18, 1966Capital Mambajao Government • Governor Jurdin Jesus M. Romualdo (NPC) • Vice Governor James Ederango (NPC)Area • Total 237.95 km2 (91.87 sq mi)Area rank 79th out of 80 Population (2010) • Total 83,807 • Rank 79th out of 80Divisions • Independent cities 0 • Component cities 0 • Municipalities 5 • Barangays 58 • Districts Lone district of Camiguin Camuigin is an island province of thePhilippines located in the Bohol Sea, about 10 kilometres (6.2 mi) off the northern coast of Mindanao. It is politically part of the Norther Mindanao Region of the country and formerly a part of Misamis Oriental province.
    • Camiguin is the second-smallest in the country both in population and land area after Batanes. Mambajao is the capital of the province and its largest municipality both in area and population.[4] Geography The province consists primarily of Camiguin Island, as well as a few other surrounding minor islets including: White Island, about 5 kilometres (3.1 mi) west of the town of Mambajao Mantigue Island, about 14 kilometres (8.7 mi) south of Mambajao. Camiguin Island is a pearl-shaped island with an area of approximately 238 km2 (92 sq mi). The island is mountainous with the highest elevation reaching over 5,000 ft (1,500 m). Political subdivisions The province of Camiguin is divided into five municipalities, the largest of which is Mambajao. The towns are further subdivided into a total of 58barangays. The five municipalities are: -Catarman- Guinsiliban -Mahinog -Mambajao -Sagay Etymology The name Camiguin is derived from the native word “Kamagong”, a species of the ebony tree that thrives near Lake Mainit in the province ofSurigao del Norte, the region from which the earlier inhabitants of the islands, the Manobos, came. Kinamigin, the local language of Camiguin, is closely related to the Manobo language. An earlier Spanish geography book writes the island as "Camiguing". There is reason to suppose the Spaniards dropped the final g. History Old Spanish documents indicate that the renowned explorers Ferdinand Magellan and Miguel López de Legazpi landed in Camiguin in 1521 and 1565, respectively. The first Spanish settlement was established in 1598 in what is now Guinsiliban. Guinsiliban which comes from the old Kinamiguin word “Ginsil-ipan” which means “to look out for pirates from a watchtower” has an old Spanish watchtower where the Camiguinons kept watch for Moro pirates. In 1901, in the middle of the Philippine-American War, American soldiers landed in Camiguin to assume political control over the island. A group of Camiguinons, armed with bolos and spears, led by Valero Camaro, fought them in a short battle in Catarman. Valero Camaro was killed by a bullet on the forehead and became one of the Camiguin patriots of the early independence movement. In 1903, the first public school in Camiguin was built in Mambajao and in 1904 the first public water system was installed. In 1901, in the middle of the Philippine-American War, American soldiers landed in Camiguin to assume political control over the island.
    • A group of Camiguinons, armed with bolos and spears, led by Valero Camaro, fought them in a short battle in Catarman. Valero Camaro was killed by a bullet on the forehead and became one of the Camiguin patriots of the early independence movement. In 1903, the first public school in Camiguin was built in Mambajao and in 1904 the first public water system was installed. In 1901, in the middle of the Philippine-American War, American soldiers landed in Camiguin to assume political control over the island. A group of Camiguinons, armed with bolos and spears, led by Valero Camaro, fought them in a short battle in Catarman. Valero Camaro was killed by a bullet on the forehead and became one of the Camiguin patriots of the early independence movement. In 1903, the first public school in Camiguin was built in Mambajao and in 1904 the first public water system was installed. On June 18, 1942, the Japanese Imperial Army landed in Camiguin and set up a government in Mambajao. They gutted central Mambajao in reprisal to guerrilla activities in the area. The remains of some of these buildings still exist today. Independence On July 4, 1946, the Philippines gained independence from the US. Camiguin was then part of Misamis Oriental. In 1958, it became a sub-province and was made into a separate province on June 18, 1966, and formally inaugurated in 1968. The People The people of Camiguin are called Camiguingnon or Camiguinon. The dialects widely spoken in the province are Cebuano and Hiligaynon while only a few people still speak Kinamigin, the ancient tribal dialect of Camiguin. Only in the municipality of Sagay is where the people has retained the usage of the Kinamigin language. English is also widely spoken by the local population. Economy The economy is based upon fishing and farming, with copra providing the greatest income contribution. Other agricultural products are abaca, rice, mangoes, lanzones and other fruit trees. The growing tourism industry have improved the economy of the province. Small cottage industries have increased in number to accommodate the influx of visitors. Churches Facade of Santo Rosario Church, in Sagay Interior of Santo Rosario Church in the town of Sagay
    • Churches Interior of San Nicolas de Tolentino Church in the town of Mambajao The Catholic Church of Catarman, Camiguin Churhes Facade of Santo Rosario Church, in Sagay Interior of Santo Rosario Church in the town of Sagay Volcanoes Mount Hibok-Hibok and Mount Vulcan are the northernmost and the only active volcanic vents in Camiguin. Mt. Vulcan, ironically known as the Old Volcano [671 m (2,201 ft)], is actually the youngest volcano in the island, born in 1871 starting as a fissure vent on the northwestern flank of Mount Hibok-Hibok [4,370 feet (1,330 m). As a parasitic cone of Hibok-Hibok, it is still considered part of volcano. Some of the other flank domes of the volcano are Carling Hill ( 9°12′53″N124°40′12″E), Tres Marias Hills ( 9°11′23″N 124°41′14″E) and Piyakong Hill ( 9°12′49″N 124°38′51″E). Ilihan Crater is the site of the 1950 eruption. Mount Timpoong Timpoong is the largest mountain in Camiguin. It is composed of several domes the tallest of which is the Timpoong Peak ( 9°10′42.3″N 124°43′40.4″E), also the highest in Camiguin at 5,294 ft (1,614 m). The peak of Mambajao ( 9°9′48″N 124°43′13″E) is the second tallest at 5,143 ft (1,568 m). A lower central peak ( 9°10′12.7″N 124°43′27.5″E) of 5,015 ft (1,529 m) is located between the two peaks. Some of the flank vents on Mt. Timpoong are Campana Hill ( 9°12′1″N 124°43′2″E) and Minokol Hill ( 9°9′6.6″N 124°44′39.3″E) Volcanoes Mount Butay also known as Mount Uhay, is located between the towns of Mahinog and Guinsiliban. Mount Guinsiliban is located in the town of Guinsiliban. The 1,872-foot (571 m) high mountain is the southernmost volcano and the first seen coming from the port of Balingoan in mainland Mindanao. The Volcanoes of Camuigin Islands Located just a few kilometers off the coast are the two islands of Camiguin. White Island is accessed from Agoho which is about 5 km (3.1 mi) west of the town of Mambajao. Mantigue Island can be reached from Mahinog about 14 kilometres (8.7 mi) south of Mambajao. Springs Ardent Hot Spring. At the foot of Hibok-Hibok Volcano bubble the mineral pools of Ardent Hot Springs. Wisps of steam can be seen rising from the running waters heat by the cauldron of the mountain, the most recently active of the seven volcanoes on the island.
    • Sto. Niño Cold Springs and Bura Natural Soda Water Swimming Pool in Catarman are other popular places to get a relaxing dip on the island. Tangub Hot Spring is an interesting hot spring located on the shore close to the Sunken Cemetery. Most of the spring is submerged and can be partly seen during low tide. The spring can also be examined by scuba diving or snorkeling, as visibility is excellent and it is also a recommended spot for observing underwater life. Sunken Cemetery During the volcanic birth of Mt. Vulcan that lasted from 1871 to about 1875, some areas in the town of Bonbon subsided, sinking the cemetery of the town to below sea level. The place is commemorated by a huge cross erected in 1982. Katibawasan Falls. Located 5 km (3.1 mi) southeast of Mambajao, the Katibawasan Falls cascades 250 ft (76 m) down to a pool surrounded by orchids and ferns. An invigorating dip on the pool is popular especially on warmer days and several hiking trails are within the park. This is also the favorite jump-off point for trekkers and mountaineers in search of adventure on the slopes of Mt. Timpoong. Lanao del Norte “Land of Beauty and Bounty,” Facts Population (2007) • Total 538,283 • Rank 48th out of 80 Divisions• Independent cities 1 • Component cities 0 • Municipalities 22 • Barangays 462including independent city ofIligan: 506 • Districts 1st and 2nd districts of Lanao del Norte Spoken languages Cebuano, Maranao Lanao del Norte is a province of thePhilippines located in the Northern Mindanao region. Its capital is Tubod. The province borders Lanao del Sur to the southeast, Zamboanga del Sur to the west, Illana Bay to the southwest, Iligan Bay to the north, Iligan City to the northeast, and is separated from Misamis Occidental by Panguil Bay to the northwest. According to the 2007 census, the province has a total population of 538,283. Geography and Subdivisions Lanao del Norte is a rugged province that ranges from the coastal shorelines in the north to the high plateaus and mountains in the south. It has also diverse flora and fauna. Lanao del Norte is subdivided into 22 municipalities. Iligan City, though traditionally grouped with the province, administers itself independently as a highly urbanized city. Demographics The people in Lanao del Norte are a mixture of Maranaos and Cebuanos. Historically, immigrants who came from the Christian provinces of Mindanao, Visayas and Luzon tended to settle in the Northern part of Lanao while the Maranaos inhabited the south. There are also a minority of Higaunons settling in the hinterlands of Iligan City. History
    • Republic Act No. 2228 divided Lanao into two (2) provinces giving birth to Lanao del Norte and Lanao del Sur. The new province was inaugurated on July 4, 1959 making Iligan City as the capital. Salvador T. Lluch was the first Governor of Lanao del Norte. Second was Mohammad Ali Dimaporo, from January 1960 to September 1965 when Governor Dimaporo ran and won the congressional seat of the province. By operation of the law of succession, Vice Governor Arsenio A. Quibranza became the third Provincial Chief Executive of the province. By the mandate of the inhabitants, Governor Quibranza was elected Governor in 1967 and almost unanimously re-elected in 1971 and again in 1980. Lanao del Norte is a predominantly Christian, which comprise almost 75% of the province, with a minority of practitioners of Islam (almost 20%). The Maranao is an ethnic group of Malay descent. They settled in the area long before the advent of the Spaniards in the Philippines. They possess their own culture and civilization which makes them quite unique. Their language, customs, traditions, religion, social system, costumes, music, and other features are factors that make Lanao peculiar and distinct from other Philippine provinces. Economy The economy in Lanao del Norte is predominantly based on agriculture and fishing. Factories are mostly based in Iligan City. Lanao del Norte is the home of Agus Power plants 4, 6, and 7 that stretch from Baloi to Iligan City. It serves as the power supply in some parts of Mindanao. Tourism is also a growing economy in the province. Misamis OccidentalMotto: where the color of nature is greener Facts Population (2010) • Total 567,642 • Rank 49th out of 80Divisions • Independent cities 0 • Component cities 3 • Municipalities 14 • Barangays 490 • Districts 1st and 2nd Districts of Misamis OccidentalSpoken languages Cebuano, Subanen,English, Filipino(Tagalog),Meranao Misamis Occidental is a provinc of the Philippines located in the Northern Mindanao region. Its capital is Oroquieta City. The province borders Zamboanga del Norte and Zamboanga del Sur to the west and is separated from Lanao del Norte by Panguil Bay to the south and from Misamis Oriental by Iligan Bay to the east. The province of Misamis was originally inhabited by Subanons whose an easy target by the sea pirates from Lanao. Misamis is taken from the early settlement of the Spaniards at the entrance to the Panguil Bay.
    • The name "Misamis" is believed to have been derived from the Subanen word "Kuyamis" which is a variety of sweeto coconut - the staple food of the early settlers in this place. During the years the name persisted as an inference of the geographical location and upon the advent of the Spanish settlers, the word "kuyamis" easily gave way to the more convenient pronounceable but corrupted word "Misamis". Misamis Occidental comprised the original nine towns of Baliangao, Lopez Jaena, Tudela, Clarin, Plaridel, Oroquieta, Aloran, Jimenez, and Misamis. The original nine municipalities of the province of Misamis Occidental grew into the present three cities of Ozamiz, Oroquieta, and Tangub and the 14 municipalities of Aloran, Baliangao, Bonifacio, Calamba, Clarin, Concepcion, Don Victoriano, Jimenez, Lopez Jaena, Panaon, Plaridel, Sapang Dalaga, Sinacaban, and Tudela Geography Misamis Occidental is located near the narrow strip of land linking Northwestern Mindanao, to the Northcentral part of the island. Shaped like a collapsible fan it is bounded on the northeast by the Mindanao Sea, east by the Iligan Bay, southeast by the Panguil Bay, and the west by theZamboanga del Norte and Sur. The fact that three of its boundaries are bodies of water gives away water life as one of its natural resources and fishing as one of its main industries. Except along the coastal area, hilly and rolling land characterized the provincial terrain. Towards the western border, the terrain is particularly rugged. Misamis Occidental is subdivided into 14 municipalities and 3 component cities. History In 1942, the Japanese Imperial forces landed in Misamis Occidental, beginning their brief occupation of the province as part of World War II. In 1945, combined American and Philippine Commonwealth forces liberated the province, and with the help of the recognized guerilla units, defeated the Japanese forces. People and culture The dense population along the coast consists mainly of migrants from Cebu and Bohol, thus the major dialects are Cebuano and Boholano. The native Subanens live in the interior uplands. Economy The province economy depends firstly on fishing, secondly on coconuts, thirdly on rice. The province has 169 kilometers of coastline fronting the rich fishing grounds of Panguil and Iligan bays. It also has the biggest area of brackish-water fishponds in the region.
    • Tangub City is a fishing port on Panguil Bay famous for seafoods. Coconut is the chief crop. This is processed into oil, desiccated coconut, and coir, most of which are shipped to Cebu. Coconut processing is the main industry in Oroquieta City. Other crops grown are rice, corn, abaca, coffee, cacao and rubber. Resources Wood is the major forest product. Predominant species are the lauan group, apitong, tanguige yakal, and Philippine Mahogany. There is also an abundant supply of bamboo, rattan and various vines. Forest land in the province has an area of 66,002.46 hectares; 53,262 hectares of which are considered a national park (which has legal implications). The province has a considerable deposit of clay especially in the municipalities of Lopez-Jaena and Concepcion. There is also an abundant source of sand and gravel. The province is traditionally a net exporter of various commodities Tourism and Attractions Pas'ungko S'g Mis. Occ. Festival of all Festivals - November Binalbal Festival, Tudela, Misamis Occidental Misamis Occidental Aquamarine Park Hoyohoy Highland Stone Chapel & Adventure Park, Tangub City Fort Santiago, Ozamiz City Immaculate Conception Cathedral Pipe Organ, Ozamiz City Misamis Oriental FACTS Region Northern Mindanao (Region X)Founded 1939Capital Cagayan de Oro City • Governor Yevgeny Vicente B. Emano (N) • Vice Governor Jose Mari G. Pelaez (UNA) Spoken languages Cebuano, Filipino, English Misamis Oriental is one of the five provinces of Northern Mindanao, Philippines. Its strategic location, numerous factories and large international seaports make it the regional business center. Political division: Has three cities-- Cagayan de Oro, Gingoog and El Salvador -- and 23 municipalities. Geography Located in Northern Mindanao, it is bordered by the provinces of Bukidnon to the south, Agusan del Norte to the east and Lanao del Norte to the west. On the north lies Camiguin Island in the Bohol Sea. Subdivisions Misamis Oriental is subdivided into 23 municipalities and 2 component cities. Cagayan de
    • Oro City, the capital, is a highly-urbanized city that governs itself independently from the province. History of Misamis Oriental The name Misamis is said to have been derived from the Subano word kuyamis, a local variety of sweet coconut and a Negrito staple. It is also said to have been derived from the Spanish word misa meaning “mass.” Native converts used to shout Misa! Misa! upon the arrival of a priest. The earliest known settlers of the territory were Negritoes. Centuries later, Malay colonists fought the natives for control of the rich Cagayan River coastal plains. The struggle for possession was finally won by the native Visayans over the Bukidnons. Spanish missionaries first landed near Cagayan de Oro in 1622 and a triangular fort called San Jose was built on the beach. The coastal settlements they founded suffered frequent Moro raids. Misamis used to be a part of the province of Cebu. In 1818, it became a corregimiento comprising four partidos or divisions: Misamis, Cagayan, Dapitan and Catarman. During the later part of the 19th century, Misamis was one of the six districts of Mindanao and later, one of the seven districts of Mindanao and Sulu at the close of the Spanish era with Cagayan de Misamis (now Cagayan de Oro City) as capital. During the Philippine-American War, Filipino forces led by Nicolas Capistrano, Clemente Chacon and Apolinar Pelayo clashed with American forces in Cagayan de Oro. On June 4, 1900, outnumbered and ill-equipped Filipino forces under Maj. Apolinar Velez scored a major victory over vastly superior American forces at Macahambus Cave. During World War II, Gen. Douglas MacArthur and his party from Corregidor landed in Macabalan Port on his way to Australia. On May 3, 1942, Japanese forces landed in Cagayan de Oro. The city was liberated by the U.S. 40th Infantry Division on May 10, 1945. Legislative Act No. 3537, approved November 2, 1929, divided the province of Misamis into two provinces due to lack of geographical contiguity. However, it was not until 10 years later that the division was implemented by an amendment Act No. 3777, adopted on November 28, 1939. People of Misamis Oriental Population in 2000: 1.126 million, the largest among the five provinces in Northern Mindanao. Languages: Local dialect is Cebuano but majority can speak and understand Tagalog and English. Most Chinese descendants speak Fookien. There are Korean and Japanese migrants, very few German. Other dialects are Maranaw, Higaunon (the language of the original settlers), Ilongo, and Waray.
    • Religion: Almost 80 percent of the population are Roman Catholics. The rest are either liberal or conservative Protestants, such as Baptists, Seventh Day Adventists, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, Iglesia Ni Kristo, and Philippine Independent Church. There is a small but growing population of Muslims. Fewer are Buddhists and Hindus. Average annual family income and expenditure in 2003: Php 89,640.00 and PhP 70,989.00, respectively. Labor force: Misamis Oriental is the educational center of Northern Mindanao, with major schools concentrated in Cagayan de Oro. Young, highly skilled workforce is available. A survey by the National Statistics Office in January 2008 gives the following data: Labor force: 2,615,000 Employed: 2,476,000 Unemployed: 139,000 Employment rate: 94.7 percent Unemployment rate: 5.3 percent In Cagayan De Oro Population in 2000: 461,660 (41 percent of the population of Misamis Oriental) Average annual family income and expenditure in 2003: Php 176,552.00 and Php 132,237.00, respectively. Resources in Misamis Oriental Crops, Livestock and Poultry Coconut vendor in Opol, Misamis Oriental. The province is one of the country's major producers of coconut. Crops: Misamis Oriental is self-sufficient in some crops. Forty-three percent of the land is cultivated with cereals, fruit trees, vegetables, root crops, and industrial, non-food plants. The top five agricultural products are coconut, banana, corn, rice, papaya and cassava. The province is one of the country's major producers of coconut. This explains the presence of coco-based factories such as Pilipinas Kao, Inc., Fiesta Brands, IndoPhil Oil Mills, Limketkai and Sons Milling Corporation, and Pacific Activated Carbon Company. Livestock and poultry: Hog population remains highest among livestock. Poultry production is increasing because of the entry of leading multi-national food processors - - like San Miguel Corporation, Swifts Corporation and Purefoods -- that promote contract-growing schemes. To support its expansion, Swifts Corporation has constructed the biggest dressing facility in Mindanao at the PHIVIDEC Industrial Estate. Cagayan De Oro
    • History of Cagayan De Oro According to Dr. Lawrence Reid, a linguist at the University of Hawai'i, the name "Cagayan" is derived from a lost, ancient sound that evolved into "kagayan", "karayan", "kalayan", and others. These derivatives all mean "river". There are three places in the Philippines named Cagayan, namely: Cagayan Province in Northern Luzon, Cagayan Islands in the Sulu Sea and Cagayan de Oro City (formerly Cagayan de Misamis) located in Northern Mindanao. People usually confuse Cagayan de Oro with Cagayan Province or vice versa, hence it is important to emphasize "de Oro" and "city" to distinguish Cagayan de Oro from other Cagayan places. In 1622, when the first Spanish Missionaries arrived, the people of Cagayan had tributary relation to Kudarat, the Muslim Sultan of Maguindanao Empire. Yet the people had not fully embraced Islam. With the encouragement of Friar Agustin, the local natives finally settled down in the area what is now Saint Augustine Cathedral and Gaston Park. On February 27, 1872, the Spanish Governor General issued a decree declaring Cagayan the permanent capital of Segundo Distrito de Misamis. All Spanish politico-military Governors of Misamis Province, who were all Lieutenant Colonels, lived at the Casa Real de Cagayan (now the City Hall). During this era, the town was known as Cagayan de Misamis. After the 1898 Treaty of Paris, Spain ceded the Philippines to the United States. In 1899, conflict between the Filipino Government led by General Emilio Aguinaldo and the American colonizers erupted with the Philippine-American War (Philippine Insurrection). On March 31, 1900, the Americans invaded Cagayan de Misamis. Resistance fighters had already organized before the attack, but only retaliated only on April 7, 1900, led by General Nicolas Capistrano. The fighting erupted in the town center. This was followed by the Battle of Agusan Hill, led by Captain Vicente Roa, who was killed with his men. After years of resistance, the Americans finally colonized the town. Decades of peace and progress ensued. This however was broken when World War II erupted. In 1942, the Japanese detachment from Iloilo sailed to Cagayan and burned most of the town leaving few important buildings. In 1945, Cagayan was liberated by the Americans but suffered heavy bombardment. After the war, the town started rebuilding. Through the efforts of Congressman Emmanuel Pelaez,the town of Cagayan de Misamis became a city on June 15. 1950. The town name was changed to Cagayan de Oro. Congressman Pelaez appended "de oro" to Cagayan in recognition of gold mining activities in the hinterland barrios known to Spanish explorers. Cagayan De Oro
    • Topography: Mainly flat coastal plain along Macajalar Bay. Highland areas are separated by steeply inclined slopes. Lowland is dominantly flat; elevation is not more than 10 meters above sea level. The highlands, consisting of plateaus, terraces, hills, mountains, canyons and gorges bound the city in the south from east to west. Soil: Clay is abundant especially in Bulua, where a pottery industry is flourishing. Sand, loam to clay loam are also present. Climate: In Cagayan de Oro, rains are evenly distributed through out the year. There is more rain from June to October (wet season) and less from November to May (dry season). Land area: 412.80 square kilometers Population: 553,966 Cagayan de Oro Local Culture Cagayan de Oro is a small developing city. It still has a provincial atmosphere where most people are laid back, casual and a bit conservative. Religion affects all aspects of Filipino life. Festivities, gatherings and beliefs are centered on it. This is one reason why Filipinos (especially in rural areas) are superstitious. Most Kagayanons are from the conservative Roman Catholic faith. There is a growing number of Protestants and Muslims coming mostly from Lanao migrating to the city. Unknown to many, there is a Buddhist community thriving in the city but is quite reclusive. The city has a young population with a median age of 22 years old. One would not be surprised to see many children and teenagers around, most of which are influenced by American or Western culture. The mixture of Asian and Western influence has created a unique culture among Kagayanons and Filipinos in general. Kagayanons dress casually in almost all occasions. However in formal affairs such as weddings (if you are part of the entourage), executive meetings, inductions or high government affairs, a "Barong Tagalog" is appropriate. You can also use a Polo Barong which is basically a more casual, less expensive than the Jusi and Piña type Barong. You can buy ready-to-wear Barong at most shopping centers. Unless you are an actress with bodyguards, women should not wear clothing that reveals too much skin or cleavage. This is to avoid unnecessary attention and sexual advancement from local men. Also dress appropriately in Churches and Muslim areas of the city. Filipino Wedding. For foreigners who want to marry in the Philippines, make sure the bride or groom is at least 18 years of age. Philippine laws prohibit marriage below the legal age, with or without parental consent.
    • Depending on the region, there are different marriage traditions in the Philippines. Among Cebuanos and Kagayanons, the groom with his family goes to the bride's house and asks the bride's parents for their daughter's hand in marriage. Usually the groom brings something like food for the brides parents. After the announcement, parents of both sides will discuss plans for the wedding. Unlike western traditions, in the Philippines it is the groom that spends for the entire wedding. However, due to difficult times both bride and groom share wedding expenses. A Philippine wedding has a coin bearer. The groom is supposed to give 13 gold or silver coins (currently people use gold or silver plated coins) to the bride. These coins are called Wedding Coins or Arras. This symbolizes the groom's commitment to the welfare of his wife and children. There are no divorce laws in the Philippines. Annulment is an alternative process but is long and meticulous. Local Language in Cagayan De Oro The Filipino greeting "Mabuhay" which means "To Live" or "Long Live..." is rarely used. This greeting is commonly used for tourism purposes, formal letters, political rallies or to motivate people in a formal or government affair. The Cebuano language is influenced by Spanish. Cebuano dates, time and some numbers are in Spanish. Example: Time - 2 o'clock (Alas Dos), Date - May, Monday (Mayo, Lunez), Numbers - Ten (Diez). Cagayan De Oro Sights and Events City Events The trade fair showcases the different indigenous and home-made products from various parts of Northern Mindanao including Cagayan de Oro City and Misamis Oriental province. Products include woven bags, goat's milk, soap, local wine, processed food and others. It is one of the core activities of the Kagay'an Festival. Agro-Trade Fair Kagay-an Festival in CDO The festivity usually starts in mid August and ends on August 28, the feast day of Saint Augustine, the city's Patron Saint. Highlights of the Kagayan Festival are the Agro-Trade Fair, Miss Kagay'an, Higaonon Street dancing, Golden Float Parade and the Lambaguhan fluvial parade. There are also cultural shows, competitions and concerts. Golden Float Parade in CDO Started in 2007, it includes marching bands from different city schools. It is also participated by local government departments and commercial establishments. It is one of the core events in the Kagay'an Festival. Attractions in CDO Misamis Oriental Heritage Monument
    • A monument honoring the rich cultural heritage of Misamis Oriental Province. Located within the Vicente de Lara Park, the sculptures are designed and created by Filipino artist Eduardo Castrillo, who is also responsible for the Press Freedom Monument. Vicente de Lara Park in CDO Formerly named MacArthur Park in honor of General Douglas MacArthur who landed in Cagayan after escaping from Corregidor enroute to Australia. The park is located in front of the Provincial Capitol Building and is now named after a Provincial Governor, Vicente de Lara. Recently renovated, it has become a favorite place for people to jog and have an evening stroll, Its obelisk monument honors the Filipino soldiers who died in Philippine wars and conflict. White-Water Rafting in CDO Cagayan de Oro is now known as the "Whitewater Rafting Capital of the Philippines". It is the only whitewater rafting destination in the country that has a whole year round of maneuverable rafting courses and is located within the city limit. Last 2003, President Macapagal-Arroyo went whitewater rafting in Cagayan de Oro River to promote tourism in the Philippines. Since then several national competitions have been held. Historical Sites in CDO The monument is both dedicated to Andres Bonifacio, leader of the Philippine-Spanish revolution and the local town heroes. Beneath the monument are the remains of local soldiers including that of Captain Vicente Roa, who died in the battle of Agusan hill during the Philippine-American War. Bonifacio Park, Plaza Divisoria City Museum in CDO Managed by the City Government, the museum is located in a renovated water tower built in 1922. It is located adjacent to the Archbishops Palace in front of Gaston Park. Rizal Park, Plaza Divisoria in CDO Dedicated on June 19, 1917 in perpetual memory of the country's national hero, Dr. Jose Rizal who was executed on December 30, 1896 by the Spanish authorities. Its marble marker is inscribed in Spanish. The monument has survived the ravages of time including World War II. Parks and resorts Iligan Nickname(s): Industrial Center of the South and City of Majestic Waterfalls Highly Urbanized City The City of Iligan is a highly urbanized city in the province of Lanao del Norte,Philippines. It was part of Central Mindanao (Region 12) and now under Northern Mindanao (Region 10).
    • Iligan has a total land area of 813.37 km2 (314.04 sq mi), making it one of the 10 largest cities in the Philippines in terms of land area. It has an estimated population of 322,821 inhabitants as of 2010. Etymology The name Iligan is from the Higaonon word iligan or ilijan' meaning "fortress of defense" against frequent attacks by pirates and other hostile Mindanao tribes. History Iligan City had its beginnings in the village of Bayug, four (4) kilometers north of the present Poblacion. It was the earliest pre-Spanish settlement of native sea dwellers. The monotony of indigenous life in the territory was broken when in the later part of the 16th century, the inhabitants were subdued by the Visayan migrants from the island kingdom of Panglao. In the accounts of Jesuit historian Francisco Combes, the Mollucan King of Ternate invaded Panglao. This caused Panglaons to flee in large numbers to Dapitan, Zamboanga del Norte. In Dapitan, the surviving Prince of Panglao Pagbuaya, received Legazpi's expedition in 1565. Later, Pagbuaya's son Manook was baptized Pedro Manuel Manook. The Christianized Manook subdued the Higaunon village in Bayug and established it as one of the earliest Christian settlements in the country. The settlement survived other raids from other enemies, and, because of their faith in God and in their patron saint, Saint Michael the Archangel, the early Iliganons moved their settlement from Bayug to Iligan. REPUBLIC ACT No. 9724,[5] an Act separating the City of Iligan from the First Legislative District of the Province of Lanao del Norte was approved by Pres. Gloria Macapagal Arroyo last October 20, 2009. Geography Iligan City is bounded on the north by the 3 municipalities of Misamis Oriental (namely Lugait, Manticao and Opol), to the south by the 3 municipalities of Lanao del Norte (Baloi, Linamon and Tagoloan) and the 2 municipalities of Lanao del Sur (Kapai and Tagoloan II), to the northeast by Cagayan de Oro City, to the east by the municipality of Talakag, Bukidnon; and to the west byIligan Bay. To the west, Iligan Bay provides ferry and container ship transportation. East of the city, flat cultivated coastal land gives way to steep volcanic hills and mountains providing the waterfalls and cold springs for which the area is well known. People and Culture Iligan is predominantly Christian (93.61%), with Catholics constitutes the majority of the Christians.
    • Iliganons compose of the Cebuano speaking locals and the minority that compose of the Maranao, Tagalog and some other cultural minorities and immigrants from other places. It is not only rich in natural resources and industries but it is also the home of a mix of cultures, Maranaos of Lanao del Sur, Higaonons of Bukidnon, and many settlers and migrants from other parts of the country. It is known for its diverse culture.
    • SOCCSKSARGEN History is a region of the Philippines, located in central Mindanao, and is officially designated as Region XII. The name is an acronym that stands for the region’s four provinces and one of its cities: South Cotabato, Cotabato,Sultan Kudarat, Sarangani and General Santos City. The regional center is Koronadal City located in the province of South Cotabato. Cotabato City, though geographically within the boundaries of the province of Maguindanao, itself is part of SOCCSKSARGEN, and is independent of that province. Maguindanao province is a part of another special region called the ARMM which has its seat in Cotabato City. SOCCSKSARGEN and the province of Maguindanao were once part of the original Cotabato province. Geography The region has extensive coastlines, valleys and mountain ranges. Known for its river system, the region is the catch basin of Mindanao. The system is a rich source of food, potable water and energy production. Cotabato contains the Rio Grande de Mindanao, which is the longest river in Mindanao and the second longest in the Philippines. The region used to be named kudaan. Prior to the creation of the Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao, these provinces comprised the region: Maguindanao North Cotabato Sultan Kudarat With the creation of ARMM, Lanao del Sur (excluding Marawi City) and Maguindanao (excluding Cotabato City) were removed from the region, leaving Lanao del Norte, North Cotabato and Sultan Kudarat, and Marawi City and Cotabato City as constituent provinces and cities. Lanao del Norte was later transferred to Northern Mindanao, while Marawi City became part of the ARMM. With the addition of South Cotabato and Sarangani, transferred from Southern Mindanao, the region was renamed as SOCCSKSARGEN. The “Central Mindanao” name lives on as a description to the provinces populated by Muslim Filipinos. South Cotabato Centuries ago, the area that would be South Cotabato was sparsely inhabited by Malay Pioneers which later evolved into various ethnic groupings that still exist in the province today. Settlers, who would lay the foundation of what would become a progressive province, started trooping down in 1914. The significant thrust occurred during the term of President Quezon in the late 30’s. The first of waves of settlers that time was led by Gen. Paulino Santos, a man whose undaunted pioneering spirit inspired thousands. After World War II, the final exodus of settlers from Luzon and the Visayas poured into the virgin land of promise. In the early 60’s as population, trade and industries grew in this southern part of Cotabato, a clamor for local self-governance arose. Thus, on July 18, 1966, South Cotabato was finally formed as an independent province raring to push its own development. In 1992, South Cotabato gave birth to a new province. Seven towns in the southern and coastal section of the province now form part of the Province of Sarangani. That was a new challenge. And South Cotabatenos, with their indomitable pioneering spirit have proven once
    • more their ability to face and hurdle diverse challenges and ably went through with the demands of times. In only three decades since its provincehood, South Cotabato has already surpassed dozens of provinces established half a century ahead in almost every aspect of development. In a short span, it become one of the leading provinces in Mindanao. What it got to show today are vivid results of human synergy and the richness of its resources. FACTS Capital : Koronadal CityTerritorial Composition : 2 DistrictsLand area : 370,589 Hectares (3,706 km2 ). FoundedJ- une 18, 1966Spokenlanguages T'boli, English,Tagalog, Hiligaynon,Cebuano GEOGRAPHY South Cotabato is located in the southern part of the island of Mindanao. bounded by the province of Sultan Kudarat in the north and west in the east and south by the city of General Santos and province of Sarangani HISTORY Centuries ago, the area that would be South Cotabato was sparsely inhabited by Malay Pioneers which later evolved into various ethnic groupings that still exist in the province today. Settlers, who would lay the foundation of what would become a progressive province, started trooping down in 1914. The significant thrust occurred during the term of President Quezon in the late 30’s. The first of waves of settlers that time was led by Gen. Paulino Santos, a man whose undaunted pioneering spirit inspired thousands. After World War II, the final exodus of settlers from Luzon and the Visayas poured into the virgin land of promise. In the early 60’s as population, trade and industries grew in this southern part of Cotabato, a clamor for local self-governance arose. Thus, on July 18, 1966, South Cotabato was finally formed as an independent province raring to push its own development. In 1992, South Cotabato gave birth to a new province. Seven towns in the southern and coastal section of the province now form part of the Province of Sarangani. That was a new challenge. And South Cotabatenos, with their indomitable pioneering spirit have proven once more their ability to face and hurdle diverse challenges and ably went through with the demands of times. The new millennium ushers in a new beginning for the province with the coming in of regional offices in the area in consonance with EO 429 dated October 12, 1990 issued by President Corazon C. Aquino and EO No. 36 dated September 19, 2001 issued by President Gloria Macapagal Arroyo, provide for the reorganization of the new Administrative Region in Mindanao and having the city of Koronadal as the regional center of Region XII. --Punta isla - Seven falls Lake -holon Kalsangi golf course -Petals bloom Rice plantation -Pineapple Plantation COTABATO FACTS Capital: Kidapawan CityLand Area: 656,590 sqkm Population: 1,224,600 (2011)No. of Municipalities: 17 No. of Cities: 1 (KidapawanCity)No. of Brgys: 543Political Subdivision: 2 Congressional districts;Dialect/Language: English, Tagalog, Visayan, Ilonggo, Ilocano, Muslim and Manobo Geography Cotabato Province is bounded on the North by the provinces of Bukidnon and Lanao del Sur; on the South by the province of Davao del Sur; on the West by Maguindanao and on the Southwest by the province of Sultan Kudarat.
    • The province of Cotabato derived its name from the Maguindanaon term "Kutawato" meaning stone fort.The early inhabitants of the place were the Manobos, Bagobos and Muslims believed to be descendants of the Indonesian migrants. Their similarities in physical structure and language indicate close racial affinity to their Asian counterparts The arrival of the Spaniards in 1696 was part of the campaign to subdue the Muslim forces. Capt. Rodriguez de Figueroa led the Spaniards and successfully defeated the Muslims. Fort Pikit was built. The fort still stands today as a reminder of the Spanish colonial rule in the province. HISTORY Christianity was then intoruced during the period with the first Christian settlers coming in from Cebu Province who wre then called "colono". The settlers from Luzon and other parts of the Visayas came later. On July 15, 1903, Commonwealth Act. No. 787 created the Moro Province comprising all political subdivisions of Mindanao and Sulu, excluding the two Misamis Provinces andSurigao. Eleven years later on July 23, 1914, Philippine Commission Act No. 2408, established a temporary government for the Department of Mindanao and Sulu which took effect on September 1, 1914. Cotabato was then the biggest province in the country or popularly known as the Empire Province. On November 22, 1973, North Cotabato was created by virtue of Presidential Decree No. 341. Its name was subsequently changed to Cotabato as provided by Batas PambansaBilang 660 which was approved on December 19, 1993. Natural Recourses -Clay Loam Soil -Carmen,- Tulunan,- Pigcawayan - Pikit -Clay Type Soil -Aleosan,- Midsayap,- Banisilan -Magpet, -Pigcawayan -Festivals -Shariff Kabunsuan FestivalDecember 15-19 -Our Lady of Peñafrancia Fiesta3rd Sunday of September -Araw ng Kutabato (June 12-25) -Immaculate Conception FiestaDecember 8 Tourist Attraction FLORTAM HOT SPRING Location: 5 kilometers from the national highway, Makilala, Cotabato Description: A major tourist attraction and dubbed as 'Fountain of Youth' because of its healing power, thus, popular among old folks who have arthritis and rheumatism. SINAPANGAN WATERFALLS Location : Brgy. Sinapangan, Libungan Description : A 10-15 meter high falls which is part of the Mt. Akir-akir watershed areas. SANG-NGAWAN FALLS Location : Batasan-Biangan, Makilala Description : A hot spring blessed with 2 natural pools. TOWSUVAN FALLS Location: Foothills of Mt. Apo in the town of Magpet Description: Crystal-clear water that offer a cool respite to a trek through lush forests, with
    • more or less 20-30 meters drop of water with a natural pool. Its temperature reached up to 6 degrees celcius at night. Food Welcome to Sultan Kudarat !!! Legal Basis : EO 82 on 08-18-1947No. of Barangays -71,151.00Population : 121,166Income Class : 1stMayor: Datu Tucao O. Mastura, CPAVice Mayor: Bai Shajida B. Mastura Capital-Isulan Land Area-5,251.3 sq km Population-675,644 (2007)Cities-Tacurong Number of Towns-11 Geography Sultan Kudarat is located on the southwestern part of the island of Mindanao. It is bounded on the north by the provinces of Maguindanao and Cotabato; on the south by South Cotabato; on the east by Davao del Sur; and on the west by the Celebes Sea. The province's total land area is 4783.1898 square kilometres. The territory that is now the province of Sultan Kudarat was originally part of Cotabato province, which was one of the largest and most resource-rich provinces in the country. During the Spanish colonial era, the land was heavily forested and left largely underdeveloped.Because of the size of the province, it was divided into smaller units. Additionally, conflicting political, social, and economic interests limited the province's progress. HISTORy Cotabato was first split into North Cotabato and South Cotabato. North Cotabato was then split into what is now Maguindanao (from which the new province of Shariff Kabunsuan was created), (North) Cotabato, and Sultan Kudarat and South Cotabato split into South Cotabato and Sarangani. Sultan Kudarat was named after a Sultan of Maguindanao, Sultan Muhammad Dipatuan Kudarat, who reigned from 1623 to 1671. It became a separate province on November 22, 1973. It has a marketable surplus of rice, corn, beef, coffee, and vegetables. It is self-sufficient in poultry, swine, and root crops. ECONOMICS Enjoy the Tourist Attraction of Sultan Kudarat!!! Buluan Lake A large freshwater lake and associated marshes in the upper basin of the MindanaoThe lake is shallow, with a depth of 3-6m, greenish in colour, and has a muddy bottom. River. Waling-Waling Considered so rare today that it is presumed to be nearing its extinction. Waling-Waling is described as the ‘Queen of Philippine Orchids,’ and is one of the largest orchid species in the world. Midpandan Falls Caves at Ninoy Aquino Lagbasan Cave has two huge cathedral-like filled with magnificent array of speleothems or cave formations like dripstones (stalactites and stalagmites),flowstone (drapery) and cave crystals SARANGANI Founded- March 16, 1992Capital- Alabel Total- 3,601.3 km2 Independent cities-0 Component cities- 0 Municipalities- 7 Barangays- 140 Spoken languages English, Tagalog,Cebuano, Hiligaynon,B'laan, Sangirese
    • Geography South Cotabato to the north and Davao del Sur to the east. To the south lies the Celebes Sea, while it sandwiches at the center the highly urbanized city of General Santos. The island of Sarangani was named by Ruy López de Villalobos in 1543 as Antonia, in honor of Antonio de Mendoza y Pacheco who commissioned Villalobos expedition to the Philippines. The early inhabitants who first inhabited Sarangani were the indigenousnatives, called "MunaTo," a native term for "first people. In 1942, the Japanese troops occupied Southern Cotabato (now Sarangani). In 1945, Filipino troops of the 6th, 10th, 101st and 102nd Infantry Division of the Philippine Commonwealth Army and 10th Infantry Regiment of the Philippine Constabulary entered and liberated in Southern Cotabato (now Sarangani) and fought against the Japanese Imperial Army forces during the Battle of Cotabato at the end of World War II under the Japanese Occupation. HISTORY Before its inception in 1992, Sarangani was part of South Cotabato and held its title as the Third District of South Cotabato. The province was created by Republic Act No. 7228 on March 16, 1992, penned by the late Congressman, James L. Chiongbian. His wife, Priscilla L. Chiongbian is the first Governor of Sarangani. They are known as the Father and Mother of Sarangani Province. ECONOMICPROFILE Coconut, corn, rice, banana, mango, durian, rubber, and sugarcane are just some of the major crops now being planted by the Sarangans. General Santos City Tuna Capital of the Philippines Highly-urbanized CityBarangays- 26Incorporated (town)- August 18, 1947Incorporated (city)- 1968 Area Total- 536.01 km2 (206.95 sq mi)Population (2010) - 538,086 Languages- Cebuano, Hiligaynon,Filipino,English F ACTS Geography The city is bounded by municipalities of Sarangani Province namely Alabel in the east, and Maasim in the south, likewise bounded by the South Cotabato municipality of Polomolok and Sarangani Province municipality of Malungon in the north, and the municipality of T'boli in the west. Organized under the National Land Settlement Administration (NLSA) of the Commonwealth Government headed by President Manuel L. Quezon, General Paulino Santos led the relocation of 62 Christian settlers from Luzon to the shores of Sarangani Bay aboard the steam ship “Basilan” of Compania Maritima on February 27, 1939. The 62 pioneers (mostly agricultural and trade graduates) were the first big batch of settlers to land in GenSan with the mission to industriously cultivate GenSan's fertile expanse of land. HISTORY The Blaan people are the original settlers of GenSan which they called Dadiangasduring the time. In March 1939, the first formal settlement in the city was established in ’’Alagao’’ which is now known as Barangay Lagao.
    • One year after the mark of Philippine Independence from the Americans on July 4, 1946, the Municipality of Buayan became a 4th class regular municipality by virtue of the Executive Order Number 82, dated August 18, 1947 by President Manuel Roxas. 6TH year, in June 1954, the Municipality of Buayan was renamed General Santos as a tribute to its great pioneer. This was made possible by Republic Act No. 1107authored by Congressman Luminog Mangelen of Cotabato Province. Finally, on July 8, 1968, upon the approval of Republic Act No. 5412, which was authored by the late Congressman James L. Chiongbian, the Municipality of General Santos was converted into a city while keeping its name. It was inaugurated on September 5 of that year. Antonio C. Acharon became its first city mayor. In 1988, two decades after its inauguration, it was declared as a highly-urbanized city of South Cotabato ECONOMY General Santos City produces export quality high valued crops such as corn, coconut, pineapple, asparagus, banana and rice Experience the beauty of General Santos City Queen Tuna Park It is a public beach developed into a park by the city government. General Santos International Airport The airport is the largest airport in the island of Mindanao and is officially classified an International Airport by the Civil Aviation Authority of the Philippines (CAAP). GenSan Fishport The Fishport Complex in Barangay Tambler has a 750 metres (2,460 ft) quay and a 300 metres (980 ft) wharf for 2,000 GT reefer carriers. The fishport is equipped with modern facilities that comply with international standards on fish catch handling. Plaza Heneral Santos – The Heart of General Santos City One of the best places to spend an early morning or afternoon stroll in General Santos is at the newly developed Plaza Heneral Santos. Considered as one of the busiest parks in General Santos, this P34 million Plaza Heneral Santos was unveiled to the public on September 4, 2009 Festivals and Celebration of Gensan KALILANGAN FESTIVAL is a Maguidanaon term meaning celebration, commemoration or festivities. Coinciding with the City’s founding in 1939, it brings back memory an epic story of the city’s metamorphosis from the doldrums of long ago, into a bustling agro-industrial center that it is now. YAMAN GENSAN CELEBRATION June 23 – July 2. This is devoted for the celebration of the business month in General Santos City . The undertaking is known as the YAMAN_GENSAN Celebration. At center stage during this period are business conferences and meetings, trade fairs and exhibits TUNA FESTIVAL September 1-5. The first week of September breaths life to the tuna industry In General Santos City. The holding of the tuna festival is the people’s way of commemorating the city’s Charter Anniversary. The fishing industry is the main engine of the city’s economy.
    • Davao Region Many historians believe that the name "Davao" actually the mixture of the three names that three different tribes, the earliest settlers in the region, had for the Davao River. The Obos, an aboriginal tribe, referred to the Davao River as Davohoho. Another tribe, the Bagobos, referred to the river as Davohaha, which means "fire", while another tribe, the Guiangan tribe, called the river as Duhwow. Spanish Administration History shows that for centuries the tribes lived in relative peace until the Spanish, under the adventurous Spanish businessman Don Jose Uyanguren, arrived in the region in 1847. At that time, the Moro tribal chieftain DatuBago was in control of the area in what is now Davao City. Don Uyanguren attempted to develop the region. Although the Spanish gained the upper hand when they finally controlled the ports of the region, the population of Davao grew very slowly until the arrival of Christian missionaries in the area. Wartime Japanese Occupation In 1942, during World War II, as the Japanese occupation of the Philippines began, the region was one of the first among the Philippine regions to be subjected by Japanese occupation. After the war, the region eventually passed to the American hands again for at least almost one year before the formal Philippine independence in July 4, 1946; most of the Japanese living in the region were now integrated in the Filipino population. American Administration-Philippine Administration After the Spanish-American War in 1898, the Spanish rule in the region ended. Americans then landed in the region and they subsequently developed the regions communications and transportation systems. During this period, private farm ownership grew in the region. Japanese migration in the region began as two Japanese entrepreneurs, KyosaburoOtta and YoshizoFurokawa, were finding better agricultural lands for building abaca and coconut plantations in the region. DAVAO REGION OR SOUTHERN MINDANAO designated as Region XI located on the south-eastern portion of Mindanao. Davao Region consists of four provinces Compostela Valley Davao del Norte Davao Oriental Davao del Sur The region has a generally uniform distribution of rainfall through the year. It lies outside the typhoon belt. The region encloses the Davao Gulf and its regional centre is Davao City. Region 11 is a melting pot of many cultural groups. Cebuanos, Boholanos, and Ilonggos are the majority groups. Others include Maguindanaos, Maranaos,
    • Manobos, T'bolis, Bagobos, B'laans, Samals, and Agtas. Smaller communities of Ilocanos, Tagalogs, Warays, and Bicolanos are also found. While the region's economy is predominantly agri-based, it is now developing into a center for agro-industrial business, trade and tourism. Tourism is fast becoming an important source of employment. It has many resorts and other eco-tourism sites that are a must for travellers. Agriculture is the main economic activity in the region and Banana is the primary agricultural product produced in many banana plantations. In 2007, the region produced a total of 3.1 metric tons - the highest among the regions. Other farm products include rice, corn, coconut, pineapple, sugarcane, and durian. The region is also a well-known center of the cut flower industry especially in orchid growing. Fishing and raising of poultry, hog, and cattle are some alternative sources of income. Manufacturing in the region is concentrated mostly around Davao City, the largest city in the Philippines outside Metro Manila. Industrial products from the region include construction materials, processed food, and furniture. The Regional Nutrition Committee of Davao Region, Chaired by Director TeogenesBaluma of Department of Health XI has been very proactive in the region's development in terms of social, economic, environment and even political aspect. Davao Oriental has both historical and natural sites Historical sites include Ballestic Island, a fortress built by the Spanish Conquistador Villalobos, and the 17th Century Caraga Catholic Church. . Natural attractions include the hot springs at Kalapagan and Pangyan, the islands of Sigaboy, Waniban and Cabugao and Aliwagwag Falls. The 'TinagongDagat' or Hidden Sea in San Isidro is a unique natural formation situated 1,000 feet above sea level. Sigaboy Floating in Governor Generosa is an island with the shape of a giant whale. White, gray and black sand beaches include Aroma, Bakayan, Bitoon, Manay and Taragona. Davao del sur The beginnings of both Davao Region and Davao del Sur was associated with that of the foundation of Davao, which is the first town to be founded South of the island of Mindanao in 1848, following the conquest of the area by Don Jose Uyanguren of Guipuzcoa, Spain. In 1849, Nueva Guipuzcoa province was founded in the region conquered by Don Uyanguren in what is now Davao Region, with Davao, then called Nueva Vergara, as the provincial capital. Don Uyanguren, then the provincialgovernadorcillo, made some efforts to develop the areas he conquered, but failed. Davao del Sur is an ethnic mix of Mindanaoans, Visayans, Tagalogs, Chinese, Japanese and Spanish with a number of indigenous tribes scattered in more than 2,300,000 inhabitants spread across a vast 244,000-hectare land. Davaoeño, a variant of Cebuano, is the main and official language of the province, although English and Filipino are widely spoken. Davao del Sur rich in agriculture and farms.
    • Natural attractions include Balut Island, Tudaya Falls, Mariscal Beach, Mt. Apo and the SibulanRiver. Davao city Davao City's land, totaling about 2,444 square kilometers, is hilly in the west (the Marilog district) and slopes down to the southeastern shore. Its highest point is Mount Apo, at 3,412 metres (11,194 ft) known as the "grandfather of Philippine mountains"[citation needed] The highest peak in the Philippines, it is located at the city's southwestern tip. Mount Apo National Park (the mountain and its surrounding vicinity), was inaugurated by PresidentManuel Quezon (in Proclamation 59 of May 8, 1936) to protect the flora and fauna of the surrounding mountain range. Davao has a tropical rainforest climate (Köppen climate classification Af), with little seasonal variation in temperature. Average monthly temperatures are always above 26 °C (78.8 °F), and average monthly precipitation is above 77 millimetres (3.03 in). This gives the city a tropical climate, without a true dry season; while there is significant rainfall in winter, most precipitation occurs during the summer months Davao City the center of travel and trade in the Southern Philippines. known for the exotic fruit 'durian' the Waling-Waling orchid, the Philippine Eagle and Mt. Apo, the highest peak in the country. Natural attractions include caves, waterfalls, rapids and mountains. Cultural sites include the Davao Museum, UP Mindanao Cultural Center, General Luna Art Gallery, and the T'Boli Weaving Center. Compostella valley The name originally proposed for the province was Davao Del Norte, the former name, or so it was thought, of the mother province. However, the House of Representatives’ Reference and Research Bureau which conducted the research and legal work on the creation of the province found out that the mother province continues to be officially referred to as Davao Del Norte in most official documents including the 1987 Philippine Constitution despite the passage of RA No. 6430 on June 17, 1972 renaming it as Davao Province. Tedious technical and legal issues need to be resolved before the name could be adopted, the proposal was thus, shelved and the name finally agreed upon was Compostela Valley, referring to the great fertile plain in the heartland of the province. The origin of the province’s inhabitants came from the ethnic tribes of the Mansaka, Mandaya, Manobo Compostela Valley mainly agricultural while the eastern part is mostly mountainous. Natural attractions include cold springs, cascading falls, butterflies and exotic wildlife. White sand beaches include Copiat Island. The Mansakas, the indigenous natives in Compostela Valley, are known for their native dances, tribal jewelry, and unique musical instruments. Davao Del Norte Davao del Norte and Compostela Valley, together with Davao Oriental, and Davao del Sur used to be a whole province simply known asDavao. This original province was split into three: Davao del Norte, Davao Oriental, and Davao del Sur when Republic Act No.
    • 4867[1] (authored by Representative Lorenzo S. Sarmiento, Sr.) was signed into law on May 8, 1967 by President Ferdinand Marcos. The principal crops of the province include rice, maize, banana, coconut, abacá, ramie, coffee, and a variety of fruit and root crops. Davao del Norte is the country's leading producer of bananas, with many plantations run by multinationals Dole and Del Monte, and local producers such as Lapanday, TADECO, and Marsman. Davao del Norte is also one of Mindanao's leading producer of rice. Davao del Norte has 32 rivers including the Agusan River. It is home to various cultural minorities including the Mandaya, Nansaka and Dibabaon Tribes, the MaragusanMansaka at San Mariano, the Dunggas Muslim Village and Aeta settlements at Kapalong. Natural sites include the islands of Talicud, Ligid and Palma Gil, and the Caliclic and TalicudCaves. Davao Region Many historians believe that the name "Davao" actually the mixture of the three names that three different tribes, the earliest settlers in the region, had for the Davao River. The Obos, an aboriginal tribe, referred to the Davao River as Davohoho. Another tribe, the Bagobos, referred to the river as Davohaha, which means "fire", while another tribe, the Guiangan tribe, called the river as Duhwow. Spanish Administration History shows that for centuries the tribes lived in relative peace until the Spanish, under the adventurous Spanish businessman Don Jose Uyanguren, arrived in the region in 1847. At that time, the Moro tribal chieftain DatuBago was in control of the area in what is now Davao City. Don Uyanguren attempted to develop the region. Although the Spanish gained the upper hand when they finally controlled the ports of the region, the population of Davao grew very slowly until the arrival of Christian missionaries in the area. Wartime Japanese Occupation In 1942, during World War II, as the Japanese occupation of the Philippines began, the region was one of the first among the Philippine regions to be subjected by Japanese occupation. After the war, the region eventually passed to the American hands again for at least almost one year before the formal Philippine independence in July 4, 1946; most of the Japanese living in the region were now integrated in the Filipino population. American Administration-Philippine Administration After the Spanish-American War in 1898, the Spanish rule in the region ended. Americans then landed in the region and they subsequently developed the regions communications and transportation systems. During this period, private farm ownership grew in the region. Japanese migration in the region began as two Japanese entrepreneurs, KyosaburoOtta and YoshizoFurokawa, were finding better agricultural lands for building abaca and coconut plantations in the region. DAVAO REGION OR SOUTHERN MINDANAO
    • designated as Region XI located on the south-eastern portion of Mindanao. Davao Region consists of four provinces Compostela Valley Davao del Norte Davao Oriental Davao del Sur The region has a generally uniform distribution of rainfall through the year. It lies outside the typhoon belt. The region encloses the Davao Gulf and its regional centre is Davao City. Region 11 is a melting pot of many cultural groups. Cebuanos, Boholanos, and Ilonggos are the majority groups. Others include Maguindanaos, Maranaos, Manobos, T'bolis, Bagobos, B'laans, Samals, and Agtas. Smaller communities of Ilocanos, Tagalogs, Warays, and Bicolanos are also found. While the region's economy is predominantly agri-based, it is now developing into a center for agro-industrial business, trade and tourism. Tourism is fast becoming an important source of employment. It has many resorts and other eco-tourism sites that are a must for travellers. Agriculture is the main economic activity in the region and Banana is the primary agricultural product produced in many banana plantations. In 2007, the region produced a total of 3.1 metric tons - the highest among the regions. Other farm products include rice, corn, coconut, pineapple, sugarcane, and durian. The region is also a well-known center of the cut flower industry especially in orchid growing. Fishing and raising of poultry, hog, and cattle are some alternative sources of income. Manufacturing in the region is concentrated mostly around Davao City, the largest city in the Philippines outside Metro Manila. Industrial products from the region include construction materials, processed food, and furniture. The Regional Nutrition Committee of Davao Region, Chaired by Director TeogenesBaluma of Department of Health XI has been very proactive in the region's development in terms of social, economic, environment and even political aspect. Davao Oriental has both historical and natural sites Historical sites include Ballestic Island, a fortress built by the Spanish Conquistador Villalobos, and the 17th Century Caraga Catholic Church. . Natural attractions include the hot springs at Kalapagan and Pangyan, the islands of Sigaboy, Waniban and Cabugao and Aliwagwag Falls. The 'TinagongDagat' or Hidden Sea in San Isidro is a unique natural formation situated 1,000 feet above sea level. Sigaboy Floating in Governor Generosa is an island with the shape of a giant whale. White, gray and black sand beaches include Aroma, Bakayan, Bitoon, Manay and Taragona. Davao del sur The beginnings of both Davao Region and Davao del Sur was associated with that of the foundation of Davao, which is the first town to be founded South of the island of Mindanao in 1848, following the conquest of the area by Don Jose Uyanguren of Guipuzcoa, Spain. In 1849, Nueva Guipuzcoa province was founded in the region conquered by Don Uyanguren in what is
    • now Davao Region, with Davao, then called Nueva Vergara, as the provincial capital. Don Uyanguren, then the provincialgovernadorcillo, made some efforts to develop the areas he conquered, but failed. Davao del Sur is an ethnic mix of Mindanaoans, Visayans, Tagalogs, Chinese, Japanese and Spanish with a number of indigenous tribes scattered in more than 2,300,000 inhabitants spread across a vast 244,000-hectare land. Davaoeño, a variant of Cebuano, is the main and official language of the province, although English and Filipino are widely spoken. Davao del Sur rich in agriculture and farms. Natural attractions include Balut Island, Tudaya Falls, Mariscal Beach, Mt. Apo and the SibulanRiver. Davao city Davao City's land, totaling about 2,444 square kilometers, is hilly in the west (the Marilog district) and slopes down to the southeastern shore. Its highest point is Mount Apo, at 3,412 metres (11,194 ft) known as the "grandfather of Philippine mountains"[citation needed] The highest peak in the Philippines, it is located at the city's southwestern tip. Mount Apo National Park (the mountain and its surrounding vicinity), was inaugurated by PresidentManuel Quezon (in Proclamation 59 of May 8, 1936) to protect the flora and fauna of the surrounding mountain range. Davao has a tropical rainforest climate (Köppen climate classification Af), with little seasonal variation in temperature. Average monthly temperatures are always above 26 °C (78.8 °F), and average monthly precipitation is above 77 millimetres (3.03 in). This gives the city a tropical climate, without a true dry season; while there is significant rainfall in winter, most precipitation occurs during the summer months Davao City the center of travel and trade in the Southern Philippines. known for the exotic fruit 'durian' the Waling-Waling orchid, the Philippine Eagle and Mt. Apo, the highest peak in the country. Natural attractions include caves, waterfalls, rapids and mountains. Cultural sites include the Davao Museum, UP Mindanao Cultural Center, General Luna Art Gallery, and the T'Boli Weaving Center. Compostella valley The name originally proposed for the province was Davao Del Norte, the former name, or so it was thought, of the mother province. However, the House of Representatives’ Reference and Research Bureau which conducted the research and legal work on the creation of the province found out that the mother province continues to be officially referred to as Davao Del Norte in most official documents including the 1987 Philippine Constitution despite the passage of RA No. 6430 on June 17, 1972 renaming it as Davao Province. Tedious technical and legal issues need to be resolved before the name could be adopted, the proposal was thus, shelved and the name finally agreed upon was Compostela Valley, referring to the great fertile plain in the heartland of the province. The origin of the province’s inhabitants came from the ethnic tribes of the Mansaka, Mandaya, Manobo Compostela Valley
    • mainly agricultural while the eastern part is mostly mountainous. Natural attractions include cold springs, cascading falls, butterflies and exotic wildlife. White sand beaches include Copiat Island. The Mansakas, the indigenous natives in Compostela Valley, are known for their native dances, tribal jewelry, and unique musical instruments. Davao Del Norte Davao del Norte and Compostela Valley, together with Davao Oriental, and Davao del Sur used to be a whole province simply known asDavao. This original province was split into three: Davao del Norte, Davao Oriental, and Davao del Sur when Republic Act No. 4867[1] (authored by Representative Lorenzo S. Sarmiento, Sr.) was signed into law on May 8, 1967 by President Ferdinand Marcos. The principal crops of the province include rice, maize, banana, coconut, abacá, ramie, coffee, and a variety of fruit and root crops. Davao del Norte is the country's leading producer of bananas, with many plantations run by multinationals Dole and Del Monte, and local producers such as Lapanday, TADECO, and Marsman. Davao del Norte is also one of Mindanao's leading producer of rice. Davao del Norte has 32 rivers including the Agusan River. It is home to various cultural minorities including the Mandaya, Nansaka and Dibabaon Tribes, the MaragusanMansaka at San Mariano, the Dunggas Muslim Village and Aeta settlements at Kapalong. Natural sites include the islands of Talicud, Ligid and Palma Gil, and the Caliclic and TalicudCaves. Today, more than half a century later, Jack's Ridge is filled with reminders of its historic past. Caves dug by the Japanese pockmark the area, and once in a while people still find bullets and other war materials in the rocky soil. Jack's Ridge was built to offer a completely new experience to dinners, and its not over yet, more development are under way to make it the premier dining resort in Davao City. The land on which Jack's Ridge now stand once formed part of the headquarter of the retreating Japanese forces towards the end of the World War II. The Americans had landed in Davao on May 1, 1945.  Mt. Apo, tallest peak in the country at 10,311 feet above sea level  The volcanic peak Apo meaning grandfather of all Philippine mountains dominates a vast area of 72,769 hectares.  Climbing Mount Apo takes four days  Before climbing, contact the Department of Tourism Office in Davao (Magsaysay Park Complex, Tel. (82) 221-0070/221-6955) or the Mt. Apo Climbers Association of Davao City.  Once known as the monkey-eating eagle; it is endemic(found only) to the eastern portion of the Philippine comprising the Sierra Madre mountains in Eastern Luzon and the heavily forested area of Mindanao.  The largest eagle, standing to about three and a half feet (3 1/2)  the Pearl Farm Beach Resort is a precious get-away where guests can revel in tropical pleasures, relish life's flavors and feast on nature's bounties .
    •  The Pearl Farm Beach Resort lies in a secluded cove on Samal Island off the coast of Davao City.  This 11-hectare.  A jar of water and a coconut shell dipper are placed near the entrance to each house so that guests may wash away the sand after a day of barefooting on the beach. In local custom, this gesture is also symbolic of a cleansing of the spirit. Attractions: Davao City's oldest church named after San Pedro, the patron saint of Davao. The church was built in the year 1847 during the Spanish period led by Don Jose Uyanguren, the Spanish Conquestador of Davao. The old altar of then San Pedro Church is preserved at the right wing of the cathedral featuring old/antique images of saints and that of Saint Peter. The only crocodile park in the region provides home to locally bred crocodiles including the country's biggest crocodile named "Pangil" (or fangs) measuring over 18 feet in length. One can take pleasure from viewing, horseback riding around the park, or feeding the young fierce reptiles. The GAP Farm has deluxe cottages and campsites, Olympic size swimming pool, picnic area, horseback riding facilities, convention hall, and a World War II cave among others. Its garden is filled with exotic flowers and tropical fruits.
    • Autonomous region of muslim mindanao ARMM Gallery Geography The ARMM spans two geographical areas: Lanaodel Sur and Maguindanao (except Cotabato City) in south western Mindanao, and the island provinces of Basilan (except Isabela City), Sulu and Tawi-Tawi in the Sulu Archipelago. The region covers a total of 12,288 km² History For the most part of Philippines' history, the region and most of Mindanao has been a separate territory, which enabled it to develop its own culture and identity. The region has been the traditional homeland of Muslim Filipinos since the 15th century, even before the arrival of the Spanish who began to colonize most of the Philippines in 1565. Muslim missionaries arrived in Tawi-Tawi in 1380 and started the conversion of the native population to Islam. In 1457, the Sultanate of Sulu was founded, and not long after that the sultanates ofMaguindanao and Buayan were also established. At the time when most of the Philippines was under Spanish rule , these sultanatesmaintained their independence and regularly challenged Spanish domination of the Philippines by conducting raids on Spanish coastal towns in the north and repulsing repeated Spanish incursions in their territory. It was not until the last quarter of the 19th century that the Sultanate of Sulu formally recognized Spanish sovereignty, but these areas remained loosely controlled by the Spanish as their sovereignty was limited to military stations and garrisons and pockets of civilian settlements in Zamboanga and Cotabato,[5] until they had to abandon the region as a consequence of their defeat in the Spanish-American War. ARMM's precursors In the 1970s, escalating hostilities between government forces and the Moro National Liberation Front prompted Ferdinand Marcos to issue a proclamation forming an Autonomous Region in the Southern Philippines. This was however, turned down by a plebiscite. In 1979, Batas Pambansa No. 20 created a Regional Autonomous Government in the Western and Central Mindanao regions Establishment of the ARMM The Autonomous Region of Muslim Mindanao region was first created on August 1, 1989 through Republic Act No. 6734 (otherwise known as the Organic Act) in pursuance with a constitutional mandate to provide for an autonomous area in Muslim Mindanao ARMM Organizational Structure The ARMM Regional Building in Cotabato City Executive Executive Council Legislative ARMM powers and basic principles RA 9054 provides that ARMM "shall remain an integral and inseparable part of the national territory of the Republic." The President exercises general supervision over the Regional Governor. The Regional Government has the power to create its own sources of revenues and to levy taxes, fees, and charges, subject to Constitutional provisions and the provisions of RA 9054. The Shariah applies only to Muslims; its applications are limited by pertinent constitutional provisions (prohibition against cruel and unusual punishment
    • Basilan Basilan is home to three main ethnic groups, the indigenous Yakans, and the later- arriving Tausugs and Chavacanos. The Yakans and Tausugs are predominantly Muslim, while the Chavacano are mainly Christian. There are also a number of smaller groups. Although the official languages are Filipinoand English, the major language is Yakan, but other languages are well represented, including Tausug, Samal, and ZamboangueñoChavacano Geography Basilan is located between latitudes 6°15' and 7°00', and longitudes 121°15' and 122°30'. The island is bordered by the Basilan Strait to the north, the Sulu Sea to the northwest and west, the Moro Gulf to the northeast, and the Celebes Sea to the south, southeast and east. It is one of the 7,107 islands that make up the Philippine archipelago. Province of Lanao del Sur is a province of the Philippines located in theAutonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao (ARMM). The capital is the Islamic City of Marawi and it borders Lanao del Norte to the north, Bukidnon to the east, andMaguindanao and Cotabato to the south. To the southwest lies Illana Bay, an arm of theMoro Gulf. Found in the interior of Lanaodel Sur is Lanao Lake, the largest lake inMindanao. Sultanate of Lanao Lanao comes from the word ranao, meaning "lake." Lanao centers on the basin of Lake Lanao; thus, it is the land of the Maranaos, the "people of the lake." Lanao is the seat of the Sultanate of Lanao. When the Spaniards first explored Lanao in 1689, they found a well-settled community named Dansalan at the lake's northern end. Dansalan became a municipality in 1907 and a city in 1940 Joining the ARMM In a 1989 plebiscite, Lanaodel Sur voted to join the Autonomous Region of Muslim Mindanao (ARMM), but Marawi City elected to remain outside ARMM. It later joined ARMM in 2001 following the plebiscite that sought to expand the autonomous region. Tawitawi is an island province of the Philippines located in the Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao (ARMM). The capitals of Tawi-Tawi are Bongao and PanglimaSugala. The province is the southernmost of the country sharing sea borders with the Malaysian State of Sabah and the Indonesian North Kalimantan province. To the northeast lies the province of Sulu and to the west is Sabah in Malaysia. Tawi-Tawi also covers some islands in the Sulu Sea to the northwest, the Cagayan de Tawi-Tawi Island and theTurtle Islands, just 20 kilometers away from Sabah. Tawi-Tawi was previously part of the province of Sulu. On September 11, 1973, pursuant to Presidential Decree No. 302, the new province of Tawi-Tawi was officially created, separate from Sulu. The seat of the provincial government was established in Bongao. The name of Tawi-Tawi is a projection of the Malay word "jauh" meaning "far." Prehistoric travelers from the Asian mainland would repeat the word as "jaui-jaui" to mean "far away" because of the distance of the islands from the continent of Asia. The word "Tawi-Tawi" was picked up to later become the official name of the province. Economy
    • Agriculture, fishing, and agar-agar farming are the leading source of livelihood of the people of Tawi-Tawi, with quite a number engaged in the barter trade business. Copra is the top agricultural product, followed by root crops, fruits, and vegetables Maguidanao Maguindanao is a province of the Philippines located in the Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao (ARMM). Its capital is ShariffAguak. It borders Lanaodel Sur to the north, Cotabato to the east, and Sultan Kudarat to the south Government Maguindanao is divided into two congressional districts, which elect members to the House of Representatives. For the brief period that the province of ShariffKabunsuan existed, Maguindanaobecame a lone-district province. Since the appointment of a new set of provincial officials for the reunified province of Maguindanao by the ARMM Governor in January 2009 , the provincial government has reverted to the SangguniangPanlalawigan setup (coterminous with the restored 1st and 2nd Congressional districts of Maguindanao) from before ShariffKabunsuan was created. Having elected to join the Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao (ARMM), Maguindanao also sends six representatives (three per district) to the ARMM Regional Legislative Assembly that convenes in Cotabato City. 2009 election violence On November 23, 2009, a 2010 gubernatorial election caravan supporting EsmaelMangudadatu, vice mayor of Buluan, was attacked.[3] Fifty-seven people were killed, including Mangudadatu's wife and sisters, supporters, local journalists, and bystanders.[4] On December 4, 2009 a number of homes belonging to the Ampatuan political family were raided in connection with the massacre Sulu is an autonomous island province of the Philippines located in the Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao (ARMM). Its capital is Jolo and occupies the middle group of islands of the Sulu Archipelago, between Basilan and Tawi-Tawi. History The peaceful advent of Islam around 1138 through merchants and traders had a distinct influence on Southeast Asia. The coming of Arabs, Persians and other Muslims paved the way for the arrival of religious missionaries, traders, scholars and travelers to Sulu and Mindanao in the 12th century Economy The province of Sulu is predominantly agricultural with farming and fishing as its main livelihood activities. Its fertile soil and ideal climate can grow a variety of crops such as abaca, coconuts, oranges, and lanzones as well as exotic fruits seldom found elsewhere in the country such as durian and mangosteen. Fishing is the most important industry since the Sulu Sea is one of the richest fishing grounds in the country. The province also have an extensive pearl industry. Pearls are extensively gathered and a pearl farm is established at Marungas Island. The backs of sea turtlesare made into beautiful trays and combs. During breaks from fishing, the people build boats and weave mats. Other industries includecoffee processing and fruit preservation Tourist spot of ARMM
    • Houses on Stilts A typical fishermen’s village at Sapa-Sapa, Tawi-Tawi. The Sama and Tausug houses are built on stilts The Bajau (/ˈbædʒ ɔ ˈ/, also spelled Badjao, Bajaw,Bajao, Bajo, Badjau, or Badjaw), are an indigenous ethnic group of Maritime Southeast Asia. Bajau continue to live a seaborne lifestyle, making use of small wooden sailing vessels (such as the perahu and vinta). They are also known as Sama or Samal. Benolen Hot Spring Refreshing and medicinal, the hotspring is often visited mostly by students from nearby state college Ligawasan Marsh Ligawasan Marsh is the largest swamp and marsh area in Mindanao and one of the largest in the Philippines, covering an area of about 288,000 hectares. It is a conglomeration of three marshes: Ligawasan, Libungan and Ebpanan. It is a vast complex of river shannles, small freshwater lakes, ponds, and arable land subject to seasonal flooding in the basin of Mindanao Seit Lake, Panamao, Sulu The month of February has always been tagged as the Month of Love especially on the 14th as the Valentine’s Day where lovers and even those who are singles find most the value of Romantic Love. Luckily, the Philippines is rich with destinations to fulfill the calling of LOVE both for lovers and romantic enthusiasts Bunbun Beach Powdery white beach sand, pristine waters and a breathtaking view at Bunbun Beach, Patikul, Sulu
    • REGION XIII (CARAGA) "Land of the Brave and Fierce People" Provinces Capitals Agusan del Norte-Cabadbaran City Agusan del Sur-Prosperidad Surigao del Sur-Tandag City Surigao del Norte-Surigao City Dinagat Island-San Jose History The word Caraga originated from the Visayan word "Kalagan": "Kalag" meaning soul or people and "An" meaning land. The "Kalagans have a long history of being brave and fearless. CARAGA (called "Caragans" "Kalagans" by the Spaniards) is an administrative region of the Philippines, on the northeastern portion of the island of Mindanao, also called REGION XIII. The "Kalagans", called "Caragans" by the Spaniards occupied the district. GEOGRAPHY Caraga Region, situated in the northeast section of Mindanao, is between 8 00' to 10 30' N. latitude and 125 15' to 126 30' E. longitude. It is bounded on the north by the Bohol Sea; on the south by the provinces of Davao, Compostela Valley and Davao Oriental of Region XI; on the west by Bukidnon and Misamis Oriental of Region X; and on the east by the Philippine Sea and the Pacific Ocean. The region has a total land area of 18,846.97 km². This represents 6.3% of the country's total land area and 18.5% of the island of Mindanao. 47.6% of the total land area of the region belongs to the province of Agusan del Sur. Of the total land area, 71.22% is forestland and 28.78% is alienable and disposable land. Major land uses include forestland comprising 31.36% and 23.98% of agricultural and open spaces. Provinces 5 Cities 6 Municipalities 70 Barangays 1,310 Cong. districts 7 Languages Surigaonon Cebuano Butuanon, Manobo other minority languages The region is characterized by mountainous areas, flat and rolling lands. Mountain ranges divide Agusan and Surigao provinces and sub-ranges separate most of the lowlands along the Pacific Coast. The most productive agricultural area of the region lies along the Agusan River Basin. Among the lakes in the region, Lake Mainit is the widest. It traverses eight municipalities: Alegria, Tubod, Mainit and Sison in the Province of Surigao del Norte and Tubay, Santiago, Jabango and Kitcharao in Agusan del Norte. CLIMATE Caraga Region has Type II kind of climate, with no pronounced wet and dry season. It has been observed that during the months of November to February, occurrence of heavy rains is usually experienced in the region. CULTURAL GROUPS The majority of the inhabitants of the region are of Visayan heritage. The province is home to several minority groups, totaling 675,722 in 1995, representing 34.7% of the region's population.
    • Most numerous were the Manobos with 294,284 or 43.55% of the total population of ethnic minorities. Other cultural groups in the region with significant population were the Kamayo, Higa-onon, Banwaon, Umayamnon, and Mamanwa. Most members of these cultural groups reside in the province of Agusan del Sur. Agusan Del Norte rice, coconut, corn, mango, bananas, palm oil, vegetables, and prawns Agusan Del Sur Gold Surigao Del Norte Ironwood, nickeliferous laterite ore, gold, chromite, lode ore, and laterite ore; limestone, silica deposits, guano, rock phosphate, sand, and gravel; chromate; Marlin, tuna, lapu-lapu, mollusks, crabs, even squids, stingrays, and octopuses Surigao Del Sur palay, corn, coconut, abaca, soybeans, coffee, and other high value crops; prawns, milkfish, and crabs; are Narra, red and white Lauan, Mayapis, Almon, Apitong, Yakal, Bagtikan, Tanguile, Rattan and Bonbon Kahimunan Festival Sumayajaw Festival Marang Festival Santikan Festival Naliyagan Festival DINAGAT ISLANDOn February 11, 2010 the Supreme Court of the Philippines declared the creation of Dinagat Islands Province null and void on grounds of failure to meet land area and population requirements for the creation of local government units. is a municipality on Dinagat Island in the province of Dinagat Islands, Philippines. Dinagat Province is the newest province of the Philippines- making the list 80 after the Supreme Court reversed its decision making Dinagat islands a province out of Surigao del Norte. The provinces DINAGAT is known as “Mystical Islang of Love”, where you can find different wonders with its natural and fascinating beauty and loving people. Capital: San Jose City Cities: 2 Municipalities 12 Barangays: 252 Land Area: 2,590.3 sq. km. Population: 314,027 at the 2007 Language: Cebuano GEOGRAPHY Situated at the Southeast of the Municipality of San Jose, Province of Dinagat Islands, Northeast part of the province of Surigao del Norte, the Municipality of Dinagat is 16 Nautical miles away from the major urban growth center of Surigao City. To reach Dinagat, one takes a motorized banca and enjoys an-hour long ride passing small islands and beautiful sceneries. The island of Dinagat borders the province of Surigao del Norte and Leyte. It is bounded by the Municipality of San Jose in the South, the Municipality of Cagdianao in the East, Nonoc Island in the South and Surigao Sea in the West. HOLY LAND BONSAI FOREST DIVINE MASRE SHRINE ISLANDER CASTLE PBMA SHRINE PUNTA VILLA BEACH RESORT KISSES ISLETS ISLETS IN DINAGAT PROVINCE SAN JOSE CATHEDRAL AGUSAN DEL NORTE
    • Agusan was first referred to by its Malay settlers as “agasan”, a word in the dialect meaning “where water flows”. This alluded to the presence of a mighty river that traversed the whole area. With the coming of the Spanish conquistadores, the area where flowed a mighty river came to be known as “Agusan” to the civilized world. (Hilagang Agusan) is a province of the Philippines located in the Caraga, a region in Mindanao. Its capital is Cabadbaran City and it borders Surigao del Norte to the north, Surigao del Sur to the east, Agusan del Sur to the south, and Misamis Oriental to the west. It faces Butuan Bay, part of the Bohol Sea, to the northwest. The economy of Agusan del Norte is dominantly AGRICULTURAL, and it is the nation's leading producer of rice. Agusan del Norte is outside the typhoon belt. There is no definite dry season. Rainfall is pronounced throughout the year with maximum rainfall occuring from November to January. Capital: Cabadbaran City Cities: 2 Municipalities 12 Barangays: 252 Land Area: 2,590.3 sq. km. Population: 314,027 at the 2007 Language: Cebuano, Tagalog, English, Surigaonon GEOGRAPHY Located in the northeastern part of Mindanao, it is bounded on the north by Butuan Bay and Surigao del Norte; east by Surigao del Sur; west by Misamis Oriental; and south and southeast by Agusan del Sur. Agusan del Norte occupies a total land area of 2,503.9 sq. kilometers. ATTRACTIONS NUESTRA SENORA DE-CANDELARIA CHURCH - NASIPIT PORT - MT. HILONG-HILONG -LAKE MAINIT -GAZEBO RESORT -DIOSDADO MACAPAGAL BRIDGE -CASA ALBURO -BUTUAN BAY - BOLIJON BEACH -ALMONT LAKESIDE BEACH RESORT - MAGELLANES MARKER -AGUSAN RIVER AGUSAN DEL SUR is essentially linked with that of its sister province, Agusan del Norte, for most of their historical existence, they were but one province under one governor or under one local civil government. Agusan del Sur, in the Caraga Region, occupies the upper valley of the Agusan River on the island of Mindanao. It now comprises fourteen towns, of which Prosperidad is the capital, the land is mostly forested, and the economy is mostly agricultural, the chief crops being maize, rice, coconuts, and bananas. Lumbering is a distant second. Industry is limited to wood-working and food-processing. There is some mining. GEOGRAPHY Agusan del Sur occupies an accoastal portion of Northeastern Mindanao, bounded on the North by Agusan del Norte, on the South by Compostela Valley, on the West by /misamis Oriental and Bukidnon and on the East by Surigao del Sur. The province is landlocked and can be reached only by land transportation trough the Davao-Butuan National Highway. Three minor roads also provide access for travelers coming from Tandag, Lianga, Barobo, and Bislig City in Surigao del Sur, and one road connects the southwestern part of the province with Asuncion, Compostela Valley province. All four roads, however intersect the National Highway at the different points. Although Agusan River is a potential route towards the province, no existing ferry facilities regularly operate from Butuan City or ComVal Province.
    • ECONOMY Human resources Agriculture Poultry and Livestock Fish ATTRACTIONS---AGUSAN MARSH -CARMEN DIVE SPOT -SUHOTON CAVE -LUMONDO WATERFALLS SURIGAO DEL NORTE Surigao del Norte, in Caraga Region, occupies the northernmost part of Mindanao and well over a hundred offshore islands, divided among one city--Surigao, the capital--and twenty- seven towns. There is much to draw tourists, particularly watersports on the outer islands, whose spectacular scenery and many miles of pristine beaches were apparently unknown to the natives until recently. Came from the Mamanua who thought that these fishermen wanted to occupy the hut by force said “Agaw”, the term which was later given a prefix “Suri” by an immigrant. GEOGRAPHY Surigao del Norte is located at the northeastern part of Mindanao between 125º15’ to 126º15’ east longitude and 9º18’ to 10º30’ north latitude. It is bounded on the north and east by the Pacific Ocean, on the south by the provinces of Agusan del Norte and Surigao del Sur, and on the west by the Surigao Strait. It is one of the four provinces of the Caraga Region MABUA BEACH SURIGAO DEL SUR was created as the 56th Philippine province on June 19, 1960 by virtue of RA 2786 and was formally organized or separated from its mother province, Surigao del Norte, on September 18, 1960. was created by the division of the Province of Surigao in 1960. The land slopes from the Diwata Range in the west down to a deeply indented coast, and then further down to the Mindanao Deep. Forty-five percent of the land is agricultural. The remainder is largely forest, and industry is largely limited to logging and wood-processing, including paper-making, although Surigao del Sur reportedly sits on enormous reserves of iron ore. CRYSTAL CAVE SIARGAO ISLAND ATTRACTIONS SURFING SIARGAO-reputed as the surfing capital of the Philippines, and hosts an annual international surfing event. Its waves combine the best features of top-rated waves of Hawaii's fabled "pipeline" and the top-billed waves of Indonesia. ISLAND-HOPPING Hop from island to island while you discover the picturesque landscapes and feast on the rich marine delights like the fresh blue marlin, crabs, squids, seaweeds, giant clams and lobsters. Once in Caraga, you can take your pick of which to visit. The alluring islets and islands of Guyam, Daku, Naked or Pansukian, La Janosa, Pig-ot, Dinagat, Bucas Grande,Britania and the
    • General island in Cantilan have white-sand beaches and are ringed by teeming coral reefs that are ideal for swimming and snorkelling. MOUNTAIN-BIKING Great trails run all around the Cities of Butuan and Surigao, Surigao del sur, Agusan del Norte and Siargao. There are regular cross-country and downhill competitions done in these areas which are participated by local and international bikers. TREKKING Mt. Mas-ai and Mt. Hilong-Hilong are the best sites for trekking or mountain climbing. The views from the mountains are superb, taking in the full scope of the vast lower Agusan Valley. Close to Mt. Mas-ai lies the picturesque Lake Mainit, which is considered the fourth-largest lake in the country, with a total land area of 147 km². SCUBA DIVING Scuba diving is a new sport in the region, the coasts of Surigao offer interesting dive site while the islands of Sagisi and Corregidor are excellent for snorkelling activities. SPELUNKING Located within the towns of Tagbina and Bislig, Banbow and Tatol caves (which are ranked the 6th and 9th longest caves in the Philippines) have recently been declared by the Japanese cave explorers as the third longest cave in the country.