Overview of HR monitoring, fact finding and documentation

  • 198 views
Uploaded on

Overview of HR monitoring, fact finding and documentation

Overview of HR monitoring, fact finding and documentation

  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
    Be the first to like this
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
198
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0

Actions

Shares
Downloads
7
Comments
0
Likes
0

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. OVERVIEW OF MONITORING, FACT-FINDING AND DOCUMENTATION
  • 2. MONITORING, FACT-FINDING & DOCUMENTATION MONITORING -- the close observation of a situation or individual case carried out so as to determine what further action needs to be taken. FACT-FINDING -- identifying the violations in one event, and establishing the facts relevant to these violations. Fact-finding and investigation are terms that are used interchangeably. DOCUMENTATION -- the systematic recording of the results of the investigation of an event Monitoring usually involves the investigation and documentation of a large number of events.
  • 3. MONITORING is the close observation of a situation or individual case carried out so as to determine what further action needs to be taken.
  • 4. ELEMENTS OF MONITORING • carried out over an extended period of time • involves collecting or receiving a large quantity of data or information • done through constant or periodic investigation and documentation of developments • standards or norms are used to assess the situation • it results in a report • the report provides a basis for further action
  • 5. EXAMPLE OF A NORM RIGHT: right to liberty INTERNATIONAL STANDARD: "Everyone has the right to liberty and security of person. No one shall be subjected to arbitrary arrest or detention. No one shall be deprived of his liberty except on such grounds and in accordance with such procedure as are established by law.” (Article 9 paragraph 1 of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights)
  • 6. EXAMPLE OF A NORM RIGHT: right to liberty NATIONAL STANDARD: “… penalties shall be imposed upon the public officer or employee who shall detain any person for some legal ground and shall fail to deliver such person for the proper judicial authorities within the period of: twelve (12) hours, for crimes or offenses punishable by light penalties, or their equivalent; eighteen (18) hours, for crimes or offenses punishable by correctional penalties, or their equivalent; and thirty-six hours (36) hours, for crimes or offenses punishable by afflictive or capital penalties, or their equivalent. (Article 125 of the Revised Penal Code of the Philippines)
  • 7. EXAMPLE OF A NORM RIGHT: children’s right to liberty NATIONAL STANDARD: immediate release of a child 15 years of age or under accused of minor crimes (R.A. 9344)
  • 8. UNIVERSAL STANDARDS DOMESTIC STANDARDS DOMESTIC APPLICATION Monitoring is done to see whether there are gaps between universallyaccepted standards and those set through domestic (national) legislation. . . . . . or between domestic standards and how they are applied or met in reality.
  • 9. WHY MONITOR The most common general purpose of monitoring is to be able to pinpoint what is wrong with a situation or a case and to indicate what steps can be taken to remedy it. Monitoring is also undertaken to see whether steps that have been taken to improve a situation are working.
  • 10. What are the purposes for which information is used? • • • • • • • Immediate assistance Relief and rehabilitation Legal action (redress and prevention) Education Campaigns and other forms of advocacy Policy advocacy and reform Monitoring compliance with standards, policies, laws, rules
  • 11. TWO MAIN METHODOLOGIES IN MONITORING: • THROUGH THE USE OF INDICATORS • DOCUMENTATION OF ACTS OF VIOLATIONS
  • 12. INDICATORS-BASED METHODOLOGY INDICATOR shows where something is, what direction it is leading to and how far it is from the objective. It can be a result indicator or a process indicator. Example of result indicator – enrolment rate Example of process indicator – number of schools built
  • 13. ACTS-BASED METHODOLOGY involves • investigating events • determining the acts within the events which are violations themselves or which lead to violations These acts may be: • acts of commission (for example, beating of a person, payment of substandard wages) • acts of omission (for example, failure to compel companies to pay appropriate wages)
  • 14. INDICATORS-BASED METHODOLOGY RIGHT TO EDUCATION ACTS-BASED) METHODOLOGY
  • 15. INDICATORS-BASED METHODOLOGY ENROLMENT RATE ACTS-BASED) METHODOLOGY CASES OF NONADMISSION, EXPULSION, ETC. RIGHT TO EDUCATION
  • 16. INDICATORS-BASED METHODOLOGY ENROLMENT RATE SURVEYS, CENSUS ACTS-BASED) METHODOLOGY CASES OF NONADMISSION, EXPULSION, ETC. RIGHT TO EDUCATION INVESTIGATION AND DOCUMENTATION OF EVENTS
  • 17. TWO MAIN PROBLEMS WITH THE EVENTS METHODOLOGY 1. The monitoring body may not hear of all events for example: - lack of local contacts - "private matter" thus unreported 2. It is unable to investigate and document all the events that it learns about for example: - unwillingness of actors to be interviewed
  • 18. FACT-FINDING AND DOCUMENTATION These involve collecting information on: - the acts committed (whether single or multiple), including updates on developments - the victims (whether individual or group) - the perpetrators (whether individual or group), including the respective levels of involvement - also, organisations may opt to document the interventions carried out on behalf of victims
  • 19. documentation -- a process consisting of several activities, namely: a) determining what information is needed and establishing means for acquiring it; b) recording the discovered information and storing such in appropriate containers (called documents) or collecting already-existing documents containing the needed information; c) organising the documents to make them more accessible; and d) actually providing the documents to users who need the information.
  • 20. There are different tools and techniques that can be used to carry out information work effectively: - Interviewing techniques and other forms of data gathering - Standard forms - Lists of standard terms - Storage devices - Computers - Filing systems - Retrieval devices - Record numbering systems Processing – action taken on data, usually with the use of a certain tool, so that the data become more informative and thus useful
  • 21. Through processing, one body of information is transformed into another type. For instance: • separate accounts and pieces of evidence can be weighed and consolidated to produce a case report • narrative information can be divided into pieces of data and entered into a form • statistics generated from a database can be analyzed and packaged into an annual comprehensive report