Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Google Quality Score & the PPC Black Hole
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Google Quality Score & the PPC Black Hole

916

Published on

Published in: Technology, Design
0 Comments
4 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
916
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
65
Comments
0
Likes
4
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Google Quality Score & The PPC Black Hole
  • 2.
    • Got on the Internet in 1986
    • Working online with search since 1996
    • Paid & Natural Search – all aspects
    • Worked in house within Ecommerce, Publishing & High Tech
    • Moved to i-level in 2008
    • Worked with Orange, Sony, COI
    • SEO Chick
    • Freelance through Seshet Consulting
    Who am I?
  • 3. Agenda
    • Quality Score
    • Deep Linking
    • Position Preference
    • Campaign Structure
    • Match Types & Ad Copy
    • Ongoing Optimisation
  • 4. What is quality score?
    • "a dynamic variable assigned to each of your keywords. It’s calculated using a variety of factors and measures how relevant your keyword is to your ad group and to a user's search query." 
    • --- Google
  • 5. Why should you care?
    • Quality Score influences your ads' position on Google and the Google Network. It also partly determines your keywords' minimum bids.
  • 6. Cracking open the black box of QS
    • QS is multiple math formulas -  one each for calculating:
    • a) ad position on search
    • b) minimum bid
    • c) eligibility & position on a content site
    • d) Other relevance factors
    • When determining both minimum bid and positioning:
    • 1) Google looks at CTR on Google, NOT the Google Network
    • 2) Google looks at both the keyword's CTR and the account's overall CTR
  • 7. DANGER! The Drop Zone The Drop Zone If you bid between the average CPC and the minimum bid, your position will drop like a stone so if position is important, bid more. You won’t pay more unless bidding increases.
  • 8. Restructuring an Account
    • Move, don’t delete accounts to keep QS
    • Changing ad copy changes QS
    • Changing destination URL changes QS
    • QS is measured in context – don’t panic if changes aren’t instant
  • 9. CTR
    • Is it too low?
    • Is it too high?
    • Does it seem to have changed?
  • 10. Quality Score
    • Has it changed?
    • Is it OK, Poor or Great?
    • Is the ad showing no matter what the QS
  • 11. What is “Deeplinking”?
    • “ Linking to a page of content within a website that bypasses the home page, or lie several layers within the site infrastructure.”
  • 12. Why should you care?
    • Landing page relevancy to the whole adgroup influences your ads' position on Google and the Google Network. Relevancy of this page determines cost and quality of user experience.
  • 13. Landing Page
    • Where are you landing people?
    • Is there anything on page relating to KW/ad?
    • Does ad relate to KW/landing page?
    • Does the page convert?
    • GOOGLE IS WATCHING! If user backs out (browser back button) you lose QS points – make that LP relevant!
  • 14. Factors that Influence Cost
    • The keyword's clickthrough rate (CTR) on Google; CTR on the Google Network is not considered
    • The relevance of the keyword to its ad group
    • The quality of your landing page
    • The historical performance of your account, which is measured by CTR across all your keywords
    • Other relevance factors
  • 15. Game It
    • Bid high – higher position & CTR – lower cost later
    • CTR across *ALL* keywords is measured – break down those big ad groups
    • Bring together semantic variances in single ad group – move the rest (aviation, dentist both in same group?)
    • Clear bad results/KW
  • 16. What is Bid Placement
    • more control over the positioning of ads
    • Can set for single spot, range of high or low
    • No guarantees
    • Can lower CPC
    • Maintain optimal exposure – minimal bid
  • 17. How Bid Placement Works
    • Activate it at campaign level
  • 18. This will activate it for all ad groups on default setting of “any” for position preference
  • 19. Set the position preference you wish
  • 20. When to use Position Preference
    • When position doesn’t matter but budget is tight
    • When conversions increase when positioned in a certain slot
    • To target visibility to match organic result
  • 21. Campaign Structure
    • Logical
    • Focused
    • Following structure of destination if feasible
    • Enables top line analysis
    • Changes or underperforming campaigns easy to spot
    • Easy to apply optimisation later
  • 22. Campaigns
    • AdGroups focused singally, grouped in Campaign
    • AdGroups can have thousands of keywords but all related to tightly focused group
    • Fast check on performance
  • 23. Ad Copy
    • Use website/publication for relevant copy
    • Analyse other relevant ad copy
    • Check sections related to AdGroup
  • 24. Ad Copy
    • Clear call to action
    • Concise, targeted title
    • URL linked to focus of AdGroup
    • Keyword insertion where practical
    • Semantic variations of keywords employed
    • More than one creative per adgroup to ensure copy well optimised
    • Pause underperforming ads, create new ones from well performing ones
  • 25. Ad Copy – Beware of...
    • Vague descriptions
    • Weak call to action
    • Pure description
    • Irrelevant copy to adgroup
  • 26. PPC Match Types
    • Broad
    • Phrase
    • Exact
    • Negatives
  • 27. Broad Match
    • Default option
    • Matches anything – including similar words – in any order
    • E.g. – ‘tall dark and handsome’ might also match ‘big (tall) black (dark) cab (handsome)’
    • Good for research or less fussy daters – can capture unexpectedly related search terms
  • 28. Phrase Match
    • Matches terms in order they appear, with any text before or after
    • Good for shorter keyphrases of two or so words
    • E.g. – ‘hot tub’ will match ‘hot tub lover’ but not ‘hot sauna tub’
    • If keyword research done and confident with it or for the dater who has core requirements in their date, but is open to variety
  • 29. Exact Match
    • Specific phrase in that order with no additional words
    • The least impressions but most targeted clicks
    • E.g. ‘likes long walks, dogs, Heisenberg’s uncertainty principle and good coffee’ will not match unless all keywords in that order present
    • Good for specifically targeted ads avoiding less targeted traffic or the date who knows exactly what they want and will settle for nothing more or less
  • 30. Negative Keywords
    • Does not match when that keyword present
    • E.g. – “gorilla” – So if “hairy” is included as negative, ad will show for “Cadbury gorilla” but not “hairy gorilla”
    • Good to ensure no ad shown for undesirable/low conversion searches, keywords in other campaign, or for the date who knows what they absolutely don’t want in a date
  • 31. Optimise your performance
  • 32. Don’t pay for keywords that aren’t relevant… … use the search query report to find and negative match them
  • 33. Create additional adgroups containing new targeted terms… … or add them to existing campaigns to increase relevance & lower cost
  • 34. Focus, change, add, and remove ad creative… … don’t just let it ride
  • 35. Wash, Rinse, Repeat Shine 
  • 36. THANK YOU! [email_address] http://www.seshet.co.uk http://www.linkedin.com/profile?viewProfile=&key=10335408 http://www.seo-chicks.com http://www.twitter.com/JudithLewis

×