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Horizon 2013 Procurement & Supply Chain's Journey toward Organizational Effectiveness & Accountability - Improving value proposition to meet the challenges of system funding, budgets & healthcare reform
Horizon 2013 Procurement & Supply Chain's Journey toward Organizational Effectiveness & Accountability - Improving value proposition to meet the challenges of system funding, budgets & healthcare reform
Horizon 2013 Procurement & Supply Chain's Journey toward Organizational Effectiveness & Accountability - Improving value proposition to meet the challenges of system funding, budgets & healthcare reform
Horizon 2013 Procurement & Supply Chain's Journey toward Organizational Effectiveness & Accountability - Improving value proposition to meet the challenges of system funding, budgets & healthcare reform
Horizon 2013 Procurement & Supply Chain's Journey toward Organizational Effectiveness & Accountability - Improving value proposition to meet the challenges of system funding, budgets & healthcare reform
Horizon 2013 Procurement & Supply Chain's Journey toward Organizational Effectiveness & Accountability - Improving value proposition to meet the challenges of system funding, budgets & healthcare reform
Horizon 2013 Procurement & Supply Chain's Journey toward Organizational Effectiveness & Accountability - Improving value proposition to meet the challenges of system funding, budgets & healthcare reform
Horizon 2013 Procurement & Supply Chain's Journey toward Organizational Effectiveness & Accountability - Improving value proposition to meet the challenges of system funding, budgets & healthcare reform
Horizon 2013 Procurement & Supply Chain's Journey toward Organizational Effectiveness & Accountability - Improving value proposition to meet the challenges of system funding, budgets & healthcare reform
Horizon 2013 Procurement & Supply Chain's Journey toward Organizational Effectiveness & Accountability - Improving value proposition to meet the challenges of system funding, budgets & healthcare reform
Horizon 2013 Procurement & Supply Chain's Journey toward Organizational Effectiveness & Accountability - Improving value proposition to meet the challenges of system funding, budgets & healthcare reform
Horizon 2013 Procurement & Supply Chain's Journey toward Organizational Effectiveness & Accountability - Improving value proposition to meet the challenges of system funding, budgets & healthcare reform
Horizon 2013 Procurement & Supply Chain's Journey toward Organizational Effectiveness & Accountability - Improving value proposition to meet the challenges of system funding, budgets & healthcare reform
Horizon 2013 Procurement & Supply Chain's Journey toward Organizational Effectiveness & Accountability - Improving value proposition to meet the challenges of system funding, budgets & healthcare reform
Horizon 2013 Procurement & Supply Chain's Journey toward Organizational Effectiveness & Accountability - Improving value proposition to meet the challenges of system funding, budgets & healthcare reform
Horizon 2013 Procurement & Supply Chain's Journey toward Organizational Effectiveness & Accountability - Improving value proposition to meet the challenges of system funding, budgets & healthcare reform
Horizon 2013 Procurement & Supply Chain's Journey toward Organizational Effectiveness & Accountability - Improving value proposition to meet the challenges of system funding, budgets & healthcare reform
Horizon 2013 Procurement & Supply Chain's Journey toward Organizational Effectiveness & Accountability - Improving value proposition to meet the challenges of system funding, budgets & healthcare reform
Horizon 2013 Procurement & Supply Chain's Journey toward Organizational Effectiveness & Accountability - Improving value proposition to meet the challenges of system funding, budgets & healthcare reform
Horizon 2013 Procurement & Supply Chain's Journey toward Organizational Effectiveness & Accountability - Improving value proposition to meet the challenges of system funding, budgets & healthcare reform
Horizon 2013 Procurement & Supply Chain's Journey toward Organizational Effectiveness & Accountability - Improving value proposition to meet the challenges of system funding, budgets & healthcare reform
Horizon 2013 Procurement & Supply Chain's Journey toward Organizational Effectiveness & Accountability - Improving value proposition to meet the challenges of system funding, budgets & healthcare reform
Horizon 2013 Procurement & Supply Chain's Journey toward Organizational Effectiveness & Accountability - Improving value proposition to meet the challenges of system funding, budgets & healthcare reform
Horizon 2013 Procurement & Supply Chain's Journey toward Organizational Effectiveness & Accountability - Improving value proposition to meet the challenges of system funding, budgets & healthcare reform
Horizon 2013 Procurement & Supply Chain's Journey toward Organizational Effectiveness & Accountability - Improving value proposition to meet the challenges of system funding, budgets & healthcare reform
Horizon 2013 Procurement & Supply Chain's Journey toward Organizational Effectiveness & Accountability - Improving value proposition to meet the challenges of system funding, budgets & healthcare reform
Horizon 2013 Procurement & Supply Chain's Journey toward Organizational Effectiveness & Accountability - Improving value proposition to meet the challenges of system funding, budgets & healthcare reform
Horizon 2013 Procurement & Supply Chain's Journey toward Organizational Effectiveness & Accountability - Improving value proposition to meet the challenges of system funding, budgets & healthcare reform
Horizon 2013 Procurement & Supply Chain's Journey toward Organizational Effectiveness & Accountability - Improving value proposition to meet the challenges of system funding, budgets & healthcare reform
Horizon 2013 Procurement & Supply Chain's Journey toward Organizational Effectiveness & Accountability - Improving value proposition to meet the challenges of system funding, budgets & healthcare reform
Horizon 2013 Procurement & Supply Chain's Journey toward Organizational Effectiveness & Accountability - Improving value proposition to meet the challenges of system funding, budgets & healthcare reform
Horizon 2013 Procurement & Supply Chain's Journey toward Organizational Effectiveness & Accountability - Improving value proposition to meet the challenges of system funding, budgets & healthcare reform
Horizon 2013 Procurement & Supply Chain's Journey toward Organizational Effectiveness & Accountability - Improving value proposition to meet the challenges of system funding, budgets & healthcare reform
Horizon 2013 Procurement & Supply Chain's Journey toward Organizational Effectiveness & Accountability - Improving value proposition to meet the challenges of system funding, budgets & healthcare reform
Horizon 2013 Procurement & Supply Chain's Journey toward Organizational Effectiveness & Accountability - Improving value proposition to meet the challenges of system funding, budgets & healthcare reform
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Horizon 2013 Procurement & Supply Chain's Journey toward Organizational Effectiveness & Accountability - Improving value proposition to meet the challenges of system funding, budgets & healthcare reform

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In this session, Tony Hall, CPO at University of Missouri has provided a high level overview of the challenges faced by the university & health system (current & anticipated) and delve into impact of …

In this session, Tony Hall, CPO at University of Missouri has provided a high level overview of the challenges faced by the university & health system (current & anticipated) and delve into impact of the shared services procurement model on organizational effectiveness. Attend this session and learn more about the organizational and environmental dynamics that drive the need to move from a centralized to a shared services procurement delivery model and the associated change management strategies involved in the transition.

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  • 1. Procurement & Supply Chain’s journey toward Organizational Effectiveness & Accountability Improving our value proposition to meet the challenges of system funding, budgets & healthcare reform Tony A. Hall, Chief Procurement Officer University of Missouri System Stacy Jones, Client Relations Manager Missouri S&T
  • 2. Agenda   Quick snapshot of the organization Focusing On Value     Impact of State Budgets & Appropriations Healthcare Reform How we prepare for the future?    Timeline associated with the development of the Shared Services model for Procurement Phases to our reconstruction (Introduction of the Health System and our MOU model) Introduction & timing of the automation used by the University today Key automated platforms used to deliver value   Zycus, Show Me Shop, @par & PeopleSoft Inventory Innovative processes used to deliver value       Summit Team Focus Groups Collaboration Value Analysis Process Improvements and Structured Project Management
  • 3. Learning Objectives      High level overview of the challenges faced by the University & Health System (current and anticipated) An understanding of the organizational & environmental dynamics that drive the need to move from a decentralized to a centralized program and then to our current shared service procurement model. Knowledge of the phases, associated challenges and change management strategies in our multi year transition and move to MOU’s An understanding of the elements of the shared services procurement model and how it is designed to achieve the highest level of organizational effectiveness. The strategic programming changes that include our SUMMIT team, a proactive Value Analysis program, the pending financial challenges and the change management strategies
  • 4. Deliverables – If we do our job today You are NOT being presented with the solutions to all your issues ; we are presenting ‘our’ program as ONE example designed for:    Sharing, Introducing topics for discussion & Growing the networking & interactions between our organizations. However – Seeing the information on the University of Missouri’s strategic evolution, one should leave with a sense of:   How the organization is organized and operates today; and How we believe it is positioned and designed to strategically lead us successfully into the future against significant financial odds.
  • 5. SNAPSHOT One of the most comprehensive health-care networks in Missouri, our multiple hospitals and numerous clinics are all staffed by University Physicians. As a teaching hospital we also provide education for future health-care providers and participate in important research. The bulk of our business units include:  University Hospital (Level 1 Trauma Center)  Women’s and Children's Hospital  Ellis Fischel Cancer Center  Missouri Psychiatric Center  Missouri Rehabilitation Center  Missouri Orthopedic Institute  University Physicians (owned)  University Clinics  Missouri Center for Outpatient Surgery  Nearly 50 Clinics  Telemedicine Outreach People Medical staff Other staff Volunteers Volunteer Hours 626 5,200 530 83,110 Patient Services Patients transported by helicopter Births Cardiac catheterization procedures Patient admissions Major surgical operations Emergency and trauma center visits Patient days of care Radiologic exams and treatments Clinic visits (all sites) Laboratory tests Pharmacy orders Staffed Beds University Hospital (includes Ellis Fischel Cancer Center) Women’s and Children’s Hospital Missouri Rehabilitation Center Missouri Psychiatric Center Missouri Orthopaedic Institute Intensive care beds (all facilities) Acute care beds (all facilities) Total Beds 977 1,728 3,968 22,108 22,774 51,632 120,985 271,177 553,300 1,825,480 5,996,036 253 144 63 58 18 182 354 536
  • 6. Our Scope • With more than 28,000 faculty and staff and more than 75,000 students, the University of Missouri is one of the nation’s largest higher education and Missouri’s only public research and doctoral-level institution. • UM Health System has approximately 5000 Staff, 400+ physicians, and offers primary, secondary & tertiary health-care services as well as serves as a Level 1 Trauma Center while also providing education and research for future health-care providers as a teaching hospital. • Our Span of Influence or Responsibility includes $700M+- over: – – – 4 campuses (Columbia, Kansas City, Rolla and St. Louis). UM System (our administrative operations umbrella) and, UM Health System.
  • 7. Introducing the Team UM Procurement Services UM System, MU Campus, Missouri S&T, UMSL & UMKC campuses UM Procurement Operations MUHC Sourcing and Supply Chain (SSC) Software Reports scorecards Hotline 24x7x365
  • 8. How We are Organized CPO Director MUHC Sourcing and Supply Chain Team Wonder Woman UM Procurement Services UM Procurement Operations MUHC Supply Chain …and a team of nearly 100 champion level Managers and Staff
  • 9. What makes us Special  NOTHING REALLY - However, we do believe that our model is unique and appears to be working (Blending the University and Health System team, Shared Service approach, MOU based performance measures, et al).  The demands on the organization are not unique to this University or University Health System  Our design and the supporting technologies focus heavily on our efforts toward accountability and customer service  Our Objectives are Strategic in nature and ALL designed and operating towards becoming Best or World Class   Our focus is on our Total Value Proposition (loosely defined as a strategic approach to increasing ROI). Now, while this all sounds like the same stuff you are doing as our program matures    We find increasingly greater levels of organizational effectiveness; and So grows our visibility, credibility and program efficacy, which in turn Delivers results to the tune of $100M in under four years.
  • 10. Let’s Get Started We’ll begin by discussing the drivers of our objectives for the next two years & beyond:   Impact of State Budgets and Appropriations Impact of Healthcare Reform
  • 11. Pressures on University are increasing the ‘organizational focus’ on Procurement “Any proposal that significantly decreases state revenue is going to have consequences on higher education, and the choices we could face to make up for such cuts in funding could be pretty severe...”. “Options would include things like sharply raising tuition, cuts in financial aid programs, limited course offerings and laying off staff. These are not the kind of choices we would like to see for the University of Missouri or higher education in general in our state.” - Tim Wolfe, President, University of Missouri System i.e., Procurement’s Value Proposition must grow exponentially; and yesterday.
  • 12. The era of declining or flat state funding… Fiscal Year FY2000-01 FY2001-02 FY2002-03 FY2003-04 FY2004-05 FY2005-06 FY2006-07 FY2007-08 FY2008-09 FY2009-10 FY2010-11 FY2011-12 FY2012-13 FY2013-14 Recurring State Appropriations 442,027,843 457,052,843 411,147,559 388,738,932 400,819,361 401,819,361 412,991,189 430,936,819 451,476,165 451,476,165 427,957,662 405,634,997 400,000,626 419,511,996 Recurring State Appropriations Withheld 13,260,835 80,134,786 26,178,632 11,662,168 12,024,585 12,054,581 11,192,210 11,822,017 13,544,285 13,544,285 12,838,730 20,900,069 12,000,019 12,585,361 % Withholding (d) 3.0% 17.5% 6.4% 3.0% 3.0% 3.0% 2.7% 2.7% 3.0% 3.0% 3.0% 5.2% 3.0% 3.0% Recurring Percent Increase/ Decrease Recurring State Appropriations Received 428,767,008 376,918,057 384,968,927 377,076,764 388,794,776 389,764,780 401,798,979 419,114,802 437,931,880 437,931,880 415,118,932 384,734,928 388,000,607 406,926,635 (b) (c) E 5.3% -12.1% 2.1% -2.1% 3.1% 0.2% 3.1% 4.3% 4.5% 0.0% -5.2% -7.3% 0.8% 4.9%
  • 13. In the healthcare system, Era of Accountability has arrived In a recent email from our new CEO to our team of 5,500 regarding our new “What is being created here and now is tomorrow’s University of Missouri Health Care — a world-class academic medical center, rising to ever better meet the needs of our community and our world.” His point… “This is our moment to rise — and yours.”
  • 14. Why the shift? “Healthcare reform has acted as an accelerant to already intense supply chain initiatives nationwide. As providers anticipate declining reimbursement, historical preferences for items based on good vendor relationships, physician preference or history are diminishing as decision makers are now moving their focus almost entirely on total value.” - Mitch Wasden, CEO/COO University of Missouri Health System The traditional healthcare supply chain model now must focus on total value…
  • 15. Impact of healthcare reform The University expects both substantial changes in reimbursement methodologies and payment reductions over the next 4 to 5 years. These include changes from "fee for service" to "population health" models that reimburse and incent providers to manage costs and potentially avoid high costs services. These models will reward physicians and health systems that avoid high costs service by inclusion in narrow networks and financial incentives. Therefore, health systems that manage costs effectively will be rewarded and the converse is true as well. Complicating this includes the State Legislators who had the opportunity to expand the Medicaid insured population but voted down therefore negating any potential offsets for the Medicare DSH payment reductions. Effective October 1st, 2014. The areas at risk include; pertain to: Reductions to Medicare sequestration of 2% (cost $2-3 M) Reductions to Medicare DSH payments (Cost $1M) Reduced payments for hospital based clinics Reductions in payments for Outpatient radiology Expansion of the Medicaid Program accompanied with reductions in reimbursement Incentives for stringent quality standards and increasing scrutiny and penalties for readmission Reductions due to “Market Basket” payment increases (money we pay back for overcharges) Declining Reimbursement by adjusting bed counts …the list goes on… Pay for performance a.k.a. The Midnight Rule Guidelines for medical necessity & ancillary services New guidelines for Medical Necessity with limits to certain classes of Medicaid pmts. • In essence we will be paid for performance. • Health systems that manage costs aggressively will have the greatest chance of survival (equated to breaking even or making money).
  • 16. To understand where we are going, you need a little information from whence we came…
  • 17. Multi-Campus ‘Centralization’ Introduced 2010-2012 2007-08 After a consulting engagement 2002 Moved from 7 purchasing modalities to 2 2001 Campuses go from Directors to Managers • SciQuest enablement began • Procurement Support Team is created • Commodity Specialist positions created • Implemented EMarketplace (Show Me Shop) now 3 modalities 2009 Health System Sourcing and Supply Chain joins UM System through our first MOU Final Reorganization of Procurement Services & Procurement Operations Multi-campus ‘MOU’ Introduced Multi-Campus MOU SLAs, KPIs Shared Governance Service Level Metrics Dashboard Hotline Implemented Program Expansion continues with development of more Shared Services, like: MOU with MoreNet MOU with Information Systems
  • 18. Our path to Shared Services (2001 onwards) Challenges faced as far back as 2001 • • • • • • 01 Poorly Organized 7 different purchasing modalities Limited to no accountability & no written objectives Challenges in working collaboratively Variations in interpretation of policies Off the radar organizationally (health care side) 02 04 07 08 09 12 The Value Proposition for delivering a successful Model   Gain of a projected 20% on transactional costs (staffing and processes) Reduction in cost in the range of 8-12% on commodities (UM System only initially)
  • 19. The phases required to complete our transformation to a Strategic Model
  • 20. Phase I …back to the evolution of Procurement Discussions were held in 2009 around the efficacy of the Supply Chain remaining independent from the UM System Procurement program resulting in development of a Memorandum Of Understanding (MOU)    The MOU essentially served to transfer the entire supply chain for the Health System under the control of the Chief Procurement Officer for UM System  This includes Purchasing, Contracting, Distribution, and Clinical Resource Management The content and context of the MOU served to outline  Services to be provided and high level deliverables and restrictions  A Scorecard that outlined  Service Level Expectations  Key Performance Indicators In 2011 the dual role of CPO and Director of MUHC Sourcing and Supply Chain was created
  • 21. Phase II Building a Strategic Sourcing Model The challenge was to find a way to operate more efficiently with fewer resources, budget restrictions, and a “vision” to become a centralized strategic sourcing model.   In Fiscal 2010 the UM Procurement Department Reorganized Roles that make our program work efficiently today  Client Relations Manager  Responsible for understanding Customers’ needs, coordinating with all areas of procurement to deliver world class service  Moving from being Re-active to Pro-active by understanding Clients’ needs on a one-to-one basis  Responsible for bringing together necessary resources to solve client problems  Assist in driving contract compliance  Strategic Sourcing Specialist  Bids and RFP’s over $10,000  Development of Strategic Contracts  Sourcing Specialist  Process PO’s under $10,000
  • 22. Phase III The final phase of reorganization allowed us to truly and strategically centralize In an effort to bring value to all business units, strategic centralization was necessary. In 2010 a true shared service center was developed in order to demonstrate accountability.  A Multi Campus MOU was developed in 2010 that included many elements of the original Health System MOU, including:  Service line deliverables  Service level expectations  Key Performance indicators  It also included elements not present but well suited to the University environment including:  Shared Governance  Dashboard vs. Scorecard  The Health System reports most things in a Red, Yellow, Green Scorecard methodology  The Campus setting was more suited to measuring and reporting service levels and key performance indicators as graphs and statistics, comparing each campus against predetermined goals
  • 23. Our path has been supported by similar growth in our Automation/Technologies 2008 Implemented J.P. Morgan’s Single-Use Accounts (SUA) program. 2007 PeopleSoft’s eProcurement module was implemented 2002 University of Missouri implemented PeopleSoft as our ERP system •In addition we implemented Show Me Shop with: “Spend Director” Cataloging function & Electronic Order Distribution •Our contracted vendors that were a part of Show Me Shop had been paid by pCard. The additional invoices were having a negative impact on AP. •We were able to implement the SUA solution and integrate it with PeopleSoft. This allowed for the elimination of individual P-Card w/o increasing AP work. •Vendors were paid promptly & reconciliation was automated. Our corporate card rebate increased owing to the use of SUAs. 2010 -2011 Hospital Supply Chain implemented the PeopleSoft modules for Inventory & eProcurement •SMS and tools for electronic information management like GHX for EDI •Implemented Contract and Strategic Sourcing modules across the entire procurement operation. •University System implements Zycus for Spend Analytics (the beginning of our data mining capabilities)
  • 24. The Tools we use… The University of Missouri has deployed key automated platforms to support procurement efforts in an era of increasing financial odds. Examples include: Zycus Spend Analytical application: Used to identify areas of opportunity for increased financial contributions.  Identifying strategic sourcing commodities – For contract development & negotiations  Monitoring contract compliance – To impact real dollar & transactional savings  Spend Analytic Reporting - To highlight savings potential & monitoring spend habit @Par and PeopleSoft Inventory: At Par is integrated with PeopleSoft using Handheld technology to streamline the ordering & tracking of warehouse supplies. Supply Chain rolled out the Optimization report in the fall of 2012. This tool identifies supply levels for PAR areas using order history to determine appropriate inventory levels which helps in cost reduction. Show Me Shop Application: Show Me Shop (SMS), was implemented in 2007 with the Single-Use accounts solution added in 2008.
  • 25. The model is producing a high ROI HOW WE REPORT THIS DATA Total Revenue Generation and Expense Reduction was measured in FY 13 at $28,802,034.26 for UM Procurement & Supply Chain. MUHC Sourcing & Supply Chain recorded a total of $14,065,457.52 Particulars PROCESS SAVINGS Value in $ RFP/B Resulting in a PO/Contract 331,080.31 Cost Avoidances 903,903.10 Cost Avoidance using UHC/Novation Subtotal 7,787,898.21 Reduction in previous price paid 4,134,586.77 Contract negotiated savings NEGOTIATED SAVINGS 6,552,914.80 1,023,677.79 Par/Inventory Reduction Savings Subtotal REBATES 130,758.00 5,289,022.56 Manufacture & Standardization Rebates 322,536.75 UHC Patronage Equity Credits 522,580.00 PHS Indigent Drug & Device Recovery 143,420.00 Subtotal 988,536.75
  • 26. Definitions Revenue Enhancement: The creation of new hard dollars coming into the University as a result of Strategic Sourcing efforts. This could include but is not limited to p-card rebate, marketing dollars, signing bonuses, rebates etc. Expense Reduction: Obtaining value in an agreement that exceeds the value of the current agreement. This includes but is not limited to reduction in previous price paid, negotiated savings and improvement in utilization efficiencies (use less stuff). Cost Avoidance: A “soft” cost saving, usually taking the form of a more intangible cost avoidance, which does not show on the balance sheet, but long term can materially impact the bottom-line cost which includes but is not limited to: Inflation readiness Long-term contracts with price protection Substitution with Lower cost item Value added services Employee Time Value
  • 27. What’s in the Pipeline for FY 14
  • 28. Supplier Summit Team / Think Tank PURPOSE To move the “historical” supplier review model to a model of value added planning & promote proactive discussions resulting in a mutually inclusive accountability program. VISION “Develop a best in class alliance based on transparency, trust and accountability” MISSION “Build sustainable partnerships by sharing applicable business intelligence, improving communication and removing ‘we vs. they’ from our initiatives”  Membership includes key suppliers from both the health system and university side as well as procurement and supply chain staff members  Key objectives: Defining factors impacting performance, foster a culture for mutual sharing of business intelligence, developing goals for success of suppliers & University and determining criteria for measurement of success.
  • 29. Focus Groups During FY13 the University hosted a series of focus group meetings across all campuses. This “tool” was used to provide insight on strategic topics through conversations with a targeted audience.  Listening vs. Talking sessions. Facilitation strategy used to encourage conversation among the participants and not to direct their conversation.  Discuss Strategic Topics. Gather groups only for critical topics where user participation will help develop or improve processes.  Identification of focus group participants is critical. Identify those that are intimately involved in the processes / topics being discussed and those that will participate with constructive and useful feedback.
  • 30. Collaboration Procurement for 4 distinctively different campuses & a world-class Health System requires a substantial amount of teamwork in order to achieve total value.  Procurement Services & MUHC Supply Chain work together on joint strategic efforts  Leverage spend through conversion of previous ‘campus specific’ agreements to ‘system-wide’ agreements  Contract management tools are centralized for development of a comprehensive database
  • 31. Value Analysis    Traditional strategies for controlling costs are no longer enough. Value Analysis should be customer focused (Physician driven), process oriented and data driven. Executive Sponsorship is Mission Critical for high returns. The methodology we selected is a systematic, organized approach to making decisions about products and services in the context of cost effective, high value, safety, quality and impact on total organizational resources while fulfilling our obligation to maintain or improve the quality of patient care. The program utilizes a collaborative approach (with interdisciplinary involvement) in determining the appropriate supplier and most effective sourcing method for acquisition of goods and services. The process is designed to be dynamic and sustainable through effective design, implementation and with support by an Executive Team while involving Physicians.
  • 32. Focus on Process Improvement Process Mapping  Developing Best Practice Process Maps  Accounts Payable Improve the current structure for positive impact in future  Shared governance  Umbrella initiatives  Building on synergies, collaboration across campuses  Making the Healthcare system and University operate as a unit.  Ever growing Accountability Expansion of our Shared Services via the MOU model Delighting the Customer  Focus Groups Hazards to avoid  Poor communication  Lack of project management outline, charter, etc  Luke warm buy in Building our future  Leadership Development  Career ladders  Secession planning  Experiment with Value Analysis on the University level Still shooting for that magical deal (expense reductions continue)
  • 33. Structured Project Management We ALWAYS repeat PROVEN tactics like          Map the Current process Map the Future state Create a timetable and project plan Enlist an executive sponsor & representative project team etc You MUST have a Charter that your Executive Sponsors support  Stakeholders must mutually agree on the project direction  The project must stay within the boundaries of the Charter, OR the Sponsors must be involved in the change Continuous communication and a prescribed methodology for problem resolution; including but not limited to  Executive Team updates  Problem resolution methodology On-Time and On-Budget track record Obtain senior management support and clearly identify a committed Executive Sponsor Obtain organizational buy-in; early and often….
  • 34. Thank you. Questions? A very special thanks to all of my team members who contributed to the content of this presentation and suffered through its many iterations! (Especially Teresa Vest, Client Relations Manager, Columbia Campus, who was unable to attend today)

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