The Use of Standards in SOA

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The Use of Standards in SOA

  1. 1. The Use of Standards in SOA Peter Roden Director of Technology Development The 2nd Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) and Web Services Best Practices Chicago, IL Oct. 18, 2005
  2. 2. OPEN STANDARDS
  3. 3. What is an Open Standard? s An open standard is: q publicly available in stable, persistent versions q developed and approved under a published, transparent process q open to public input: public comments, public archives, no Non-Disclosure Agreements (NDA) q subject to explicit, disclosed (Intellectual Property Rights) IPR terms s Anything else is proprietary q That's not a pejorative, it's a description q Using a single company's method, or joint work from several companies, may be fine: but it has a different set of risks and qualities than the official output from a genuine open standards process © OASIS, 2005 3
  4. 4. Standards ROI s Normalizing data, processes and users costs time and money s ROI can come from operational savings and outweigh the costs, if those savings are stable and persistent s This requires: q Established versioning q Reliable, fixed terms of availability (some protection against withdrawal or “embrace-and extend”) q INTEROPERABLE standards q CONVERGING standards © OASIS, 2005 4
  5. 5. Regulatory case for Open Standards s Increasingly, it matters to government regulators and implementers whether standards are developed under an open, fair, vendor-neutral process. q WTO Technical Barriers to Trade Agreement s http://www.wto.org/english/docs_e/ legal_e/final_e.htm q United States criteria s http://www.whitehouse.gov/omb/circulars/a119/ a119.html) s Industry users care about the same issues © OASIS, 2005 5
  6. 6. Interoperating with the world s Cooperation, liaison and harmonization with other standards organizations is a strategic OASIS priority q Working to reduce duplication and promote interoperability q Gaining sanction/authority & adoption for OASIS Standards s Formal working relationships with: q ISO, IEC, ITU, UN-ECE MoU for E-Business q ISO/IEC JTC1 SC34, ISO TC154 (Cat. A Liaison) q ITU-T A.4 and A.5 Recognition q IPTC, LISA, SWIFT, UPU q ABA, ACORD, AIAG, HL7, HR-XML, ISM, MBAA, NASPO, European ICTSB, CEN/ISSS, EC SEEM, PISCES, LRC q Asia PKI, CNNIC, EA-ECA, ECIF, KIEC, PSLX, Standards-AU q BPMI, CommerceNet, GGF, IDEAlliance, OAGi, OGC, OMA, OMG, RosettaNet/UCC, W3C, WfMC, WSCC, WS-I, ANSI © OASIS, 2005 6
  7. 7. Standards Adoption s To be successful, a standard must be used s Adoption is most likely when the standard is q Freely accessible q Meets the needs of a large number of adopters q Flexible enough to change as needs change q Produces consistent results q Checkable for conformance, compatibility q Implemented and thus practically available s Sanction and traction both matter © OASIS, 2005 7
  8. 8. Standards: Traction vs. Sanction TRACTION XML W3C Market Adoption SOAP v1.2 SOAP v1.1 W3C WSDL v1.2 WSDL v1.1 W3C ebXML(x4) ISO OASIS 15000 WS-S WS-Security OASIS UDDI v2,3 UDDI v2,3 UDDI.org OASIS SGML ISO WS-BPEL BPEL4WS OASIS JOINT STANDARDS PROPRIETARY COMMERICAL CONSORTIA DEVELOPMENT VENTURE ORGANIZATION SANCTION Open Standardization © OASIS, 2005 8
  9. 9. INTEROPERABILTY
  10. 10. What is interoperability? s The harmonization of e-business standards s Sometimes there is more than one way to fulfill a need: © OASIS, 2005 10
  11. 11. Multiple Standards may co-exist s Different legacy systems or business requirements may require different methods SIMPLE COMPLEX Lightweight code Heavyweight code, more functionality Limited Use Case Highly scalable Easier to build, deploy Bigger tools, higher cost Loose Coupling More exclusive © OASIS, 2005 11
  12. 12. Interoperability & Convergence s Multiple filters make it happen 1 2 3 6. Open standards process 7. Proximity breeds comparison & convergence … and users drive convergence & optimization 8. Methods find their place in the marketplace © OASIS, 2005 12
  13. 13. Functional Categories to Track Standards Work ORCHESTRATION DATA & MANAGEMENT CONTENT SECURITY SOA DESCRIPTION & ACCESS MESSAGING DISCOVERY COMMON MESSAGE (XML) COMMON TRANSPORT © OASIS, 2005 13
  14. 14. Technical Projects (12/04) ORCHESTRATION DATA & MANAGEMENT CONTENT SECURITY SOA DESCRIPTION & ACCESS Approval Levels MESSAGING DISCOVERY COMMON MESSAGE (XML) COMMON TRANSPORT © OASIS, 2005 14
  15. 15. Technical Projects (9/05) ORCHESTRATION DATA & MANAGEMENT CONTENT New Work SECURITY SOA DESCRIPTION & ACCESS Approval Levels MESSAGING DISCOVERY COMMON MESSAGE (XML) COMMON TRANSPORT © OASIS, 2005 15
  16. 16. Technical Standards ASAP, BTP, ebXML-BP, CIQ, CGM, DocBook, WSBPEL, WSCAF OpenDocument, UBL ORCHESTRATION DATA AVDL, eGOV, Election, eProc, & MANAGEMENT CONTENT Emergency, Legal XML, Materials, PLCS, PPS, TaxML, DCML (x3), WSDM, TransWs, WAS, XLIFF, (Auto WSRF, WS-Notification Repair) SPML, XACML, ABCM, (Conformance), ebSOA, (DSML) FWSI, SOA Blueprints, SOA-RM SECURITY SOA DESCRIPTION & ACCESS ebXML CPPA, HumanML, UIML, WSRP DSS, PKI, SAML, WS-Security, XCBF DITA, EntityRes, Topic Maps, Pub. Subj, XDI, XRI ebXML, RegRep, UDDI MESSAGING DISCOVERY ebXML MSG, ebXML IIC, WS-Reliability, WS-RX Relax NG, XSLT Conformance COMMON MESSAGE (XML) COMMON TRANSPORT © OASIS, 2005 16
  17. 17. Modularity: all the things that we use must work together © OASIS, 2005 17
  18. 18. Multiple Standards in the Real World HTML IMAP / POP3 SMTP Typical ASCII / Unicode e-mail URIs TCP IP © OASIS, 2005 18
  19. 19. Real-world installations are composed of multiple standards DATA ORCHESTRATION & MANAGEMENT UBL CONTENT ebXML BP XForms Example: The OASIS SECURITY & ACCESS XACML SOA ebXML CPA DESCRIPTION Disease Control Interoperability Demo at XML 2003 ebXML ebXML MSG Registry MESSAGING DISCOVERY COMMON MESSAGE (XML) COMMON TRANSPORT © OASIS, 2005 19
  20. 20. Interoperability requires flexibility We use many diverse methods and legacy systems. All of the methods we use must be: MODULAR INTEROPERABLE MANAGEABLE STANDARDIZED © OASIS, 2005 20
  21. 21. OASIS STANDARDS
  22. 22. Technical trends in OASIS work s Infrastructure work is maturing s The action is moving up ORCHESTRATION DATA the "stack" to content & MANAGEMENT CONTENT and semantics SECURITY & ACCESS SOA DESCRIPTION s Stronger emphasis on service orientation: interoperability and MESSAGING DISCOVERY COMMON MESSAGE (XML) modularity COMMON TRANSPORT s End users are providing more of the content © OASIS, 2005 22
  23. 23. OASIS: Infrastructure Discovery s ebXML Registry s UDDI Spec ORCHESTRATION DATA & MANAGEMENT CONTENT Messaging SECURITY SOA DESCRIPTION s ebXML Messaging & ACCESS s ebXML IIC MESSAGING DISCOVERY s WSRM TC (WS-Reliability) s WS-Reliable Exchange XML Methods COMMON MESSAGE (XML) COMMON TRANSPORT s RELAX-NG s XSLT Conformance © OASIS, 2005 23
  24. 24. OASIS: Security & Access Control s Digital Signature Services s PKI s Provisioning Services (SPML) ORCHESTRATION DATA Security Services (SAML) & MANAGEMENT CONTENT s SECURITY SOA DESCRIPTION s Web Services Security & ACCESS s XACML (Extensible Access MESSAGING DISCOVERY Control ML) s XCBF (Common Biometric COMMON MESSAGE (XML) Format) COMMON TRANSPORT s DSML [completed] © OASIS, 2005 24
  25. 25. Service Orientation 2005 What is SOA? SOA Central concept ... but: s Registry centric? s Web services centric? ORCHESTRATION DATA & MANAGEMENT CONTENT s ebXML centric? SECURITY SOA DESCRIPTION s EDI on steroids? & ACCESS s CORBA on steroids? MESSAGING DISCOVERY s XML centric? COMMON MESSAGE (XML) s OO centric? COMMON TRANSPORT s Model centric? Internet WWW s Semantics centric? 1995 © OASIS, 2005 25
  26. 26. Service Orientation and Data Harmonization s Today's WS-this, EB-that and UM-the other may be tomorrow's something else ORCHESTRATION & MANAGEMENT DATA CONTENT s But the functional data models will outlive any single SECURITY & ACCESS SOA DESCRIPTION implementation MESSAGING DISCOVERY s IF they are: q MODULAR COMMON MESSAGE (XML) q INTEROPERABLE COMMON TRANSPORT q MANAGEABLE q STANDARDIZED © OASIS, 2005 26
  27. 27. OASIS: SOA Domain s BCM ORCHESTRATION DATA s ebSOA & MANAGEMENT CONTENT s Framework for WS SECURITY & ACCESS SOA DESCRIPTION Implementation MESSAGING DISCOVERY s SOA Adoption Blueprints s SOA Reference Model COMMON MESSAGE (XML) COMMON TRANSPORT s Conformance [completed] © OASIS, 2005 27
  28. 28. OASIS: Service and Data Description s ebXML CPP/A s HumanMarkup ORCHESTRATION DATA s User Interface ML (UIML) WSRP (Portlets) & MANAGEMENT CONTENT s SECURITY & ACCESS SOA DESCRIPTION s DITA s Entity Resolution Published Subjects (Topic MESSAGING DISCOVERY s Maps) COMMON MESSAGE (XML) COMMON TRANSPORT s XDI s XRI © OASIS, 2005 28
  29. 29. OASIS: Data Content s AVDL s CGMO WebCGM s CIQ s DocBook s eGov s ElectionML s Emergency Mgmt (Common Alerting) s EPS (Procurement) ORCHESTRATION DATA & MANAGEMENT CONTENT s LX-Court Filing s LX-eContracts s LX-eNotary SECURITY & ACCESS SOA DESCRIPTION s LX-Integ Justice s IHC (Health) s Materials MESSAGING DISCOVERY s OBIX s OpenDocument s Product Lifecycle (PLCS) COMMON MESSAGE (XML) COMMON TRANSPORT s PPS s TaxXML s Trans WS s UBL s WAS s XLIFF s [Auto Repair] © OASIS, 2005 29
  30. 30. OASIS: Orchestration & Management s ASAP s Business Transactions s CAM ORCHESTRATION DATA s ebXML-BP & MANAGEMENT CONTENT s SOA-RM s WSBPEL SECURITY & ACCESS SOA DESCRIPTION s WS-CAF s DCML-Adoption DCML-Apps & Services MESSAGING DISCOVERY s s DCML-Framework COMMON MESSAGE (XML) COMMON TRANSPORT s WSDM (Mgmt) s WS-Notification s WS-Resource Framework © OASIS, 2005 30
  31. 31. WHY OASIS?
  32. 32. What is OASIS? s OASIS = Organization for the Advancement of Structured Information Standards s OASIS has been developing e-Standards since 1993 s OASIS is a member-led, international non-profit standards consortium concentrating on structured information and global e-business standards. s Over 6000 members and 650 organizations s Supports over 60 technical committees producing royalty-free and RAND standards in an open process. “The largest standards group for electronic commerce on the Web” © OASIS, 2005 32
  33. 33. OASIS Member Distribution 50% Technology Providers s Software vendors s Industry organisations 15% s Individuals / small Government & developers Academic s Governments s Universities s Research centres & related nonprofits 35% Users and influencers • User companies • Vertical industry organisations • Individuals / small consultancies © OASIS, 2005 33
  34. 34. OASIS Membership Expanding Globally North America Asia-Pacific 2004 2000 Europe 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% % of Members © OASIS, 2005 34
  35. 35. OASIS Technical Work s The OASIS technical agenda is set by our members; bottom-up approach s A Technical Committee (TC) is formed by a proposal of our members s Each Technical Committee sets its own scope, schedule, and deliverables s More than 60 Technical Committees in a variety of topic areas q E-business q Security q Web services q Public sector © OASIS, 2005 35
  36. 36. OASIS Standards Process s Specifications are created under an open, democratic, vendor-neutral process q Any interested parties may either participate or comment q No one organization can dictate the specification q Ensures that specifications meet everyone’s needs, not just those of the largest players s All discussion is open to public inspection and comment s Bi-level approval process q TC approves Committee Draft q OASIS members approve OASIS Standard s Resulting work is representative broad range of industry, not just any one vendor’s view © OASIS, 2005 36
  37. 37. Technical Work Process 1. Any three or more OASIS members propose creation of a Technical Committee (TC) 2. Existing technical work submitted to TC; or TC starts work at the beginning. TC conducts and completes technical work; open and publicly viewable 3. TC votes to approve work as an OASIS Committee Draft 4. TC conducts public review, and three or more OASIS members must implement the specification 5. TC revises and re-approves the specification 6. TC votes to submit the Committee Draft to OASIS membership for consideration 7. OASIS membership reviews, approves the Committee Draft as an OASIS Standard © OASIS, 2005 37
  38. 38. Focused Content s www.oasis-open.org s www.xml.org q egovernment.xml.org q finance.xml.org q healthcare.xml.org q hr.xml.org q insurance.xml.org q localisation.xml.org q publishing.xml.org q security.xml.org s xml.coverpages.org s www.cgmopen.org s www.dcml.org s www.legalxml.org s www.pkiforum.org s www.uddi.org © OASIS, 2005 38
  39. 39. Membership Benefits s Influence s Information s Participation s Education s Co-ordination s Credibility s Visibility s Openess © OASIS, 2005 39
  40. 40. Software Vendor Benefits s Form a committee to standardize current proprietary processes or schemas s Influence the direction of an existing committee by submitting materials to the committee s Influence the direction by articulating preferences s Gain early feedback on new concepts and ideas s Access to early drafts of new specifications s Actively participate in interoperability tests s Find partners and develop joint solutions s Become part of a ”bigger picture”; especially important for small – medium software vendors s Promote your company with events and information channel sponsorship s Meet and work with end user organisation as well as industry organisation s Identify potential customers with a real and expressed needs © OASIS, 2005 40
  41. 41. End-User Company Benefits s Educate employees on trends and developments of technology s Learn and adopt best practices s Influence direction and priorities of standards development by providing business requirements s Evaluate and observe vendors in their implementation and product directions s Participate in interoperability demos by providing business scenarios s See practical implementations from multiple vendors for given scenarios © OASIS, 2005 41
  42. 42. Government Benefits s Educate staff to learn about general e-Business frameworks s Influence software vendors to develop solutions for your government q Increases number of competitive solutions q Lowers cost of implementations for your agencies s Enable cross-government adoption s Participate in inter-government standards activities s Learn and adopt best practices s Coordinate complimentary standards activities – minimise overlap s Speed up development and adoption of new technologies and emerging standards s Minimize risk in evaluation of new technology directions s Monitor open standards and marketplace adoptions for recommendation in government structure s Monitor and evaluate best practises for recommendations to industries and companies within your country or region © OASIS, 2005 42
  43. 43. University and Research Center Benefits s Monitor ”state of the art” in technology and standards development s Propose new ideas and receive feedback to those ideas s Reduce the ”time to market” from concept to wide spread adoption s Create a broader market for adoption of development from your research projects s Gain visability for your project efforts s Establish closer ties with more industry and government organisations © OASIS, 2005 43
  44. 44. What should a user do? s Bring your use cases to the standards table s Be prepared to compromise s If you can participate as an active contributor, do so s If you don’t have the bandwidth to contribute actively, be a good observer s Understand the ground rules s Expect conformance s Be a good citizen: share your experience © OASIS, 2005 44
  45. 45. Peter Roden Director of Technology Development OASIS 630 Boston Road Billerica, MA 01821 USA +1 978 667 5115 Ext. 210 (Voice) +1 978 761 1648 (Mobile) +1 978 667 5114 (Fax) Peter.Roden@oasis-open.org © OASIS, 2005 45

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