SOA Market and Products 2006: Current State, Future Directions

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SOA Market and Products 2006: Current State, Future Directions

  1. 1. SOA Market and Products 2006: Current State, Future Directions A Research Report Prepared by EMA April 2006
  2. 2. Table of Contents Executive Summary ..............................................................................................................................................................................1 Methodology ..........................................................................................................................................................................................1 Summary of Conclusions ....................................................................................................................................................................2 SOA-specific Semantics and Concepts .............................................................................................................................................2 Big Challenges, Big Opportunities ....................................................................................................................................................3 Components as Building Blocks ..................................................................................................................................................4 Virtualized Business Services .......................................................................................................................................................4 Machine to Machine Communications .......................................................................................................................................7 Heterogeneity...................................................................................................................................................................................7 Orchestration ...................................................................................................................................................................................8 SOA Runtime ...................................................................................................................................................................................8 Computing Beyond Organizational Borders .............................................................................................................................9 Critical Web Services Standards Still in Development ...................................................................................................................10 Product Categories ................................................................................................................................................................................12 Product Briefs ........................................................................................................................................................................................12 Altiris Product Brief .............................................................................................................................................................................13 Context and Market Focus ............................................................................................................................................................13 Concept, Product Information and Description ......................................................................................................................13 Distinguishing Features and Key Benefits..................................................................................................................................14 Target Verticals ................................................................................................................................................................................16 Multi-Vendor and Standards Directions .....................................................................................................................................16 EMA’s Perspective ...........................................................................................................................................................................17 AmberPoint Product Brief ..................................................................................................................................................................18 Context and Market Focus ............................................................................................................................................................18 Concept, Product Information and Description ......................................................................................................................19 Distinguishing Features and Key Benefits..................................................................................................................................20 Target Verticals ................................................................................................................................................................................20 Multi-Vendor and Standards Directions .....................................................................................................................................21 EMA’s Perspective ...........................................................................................................................................................................22 SOA Market and Products 2006: Current State, Future Directions ©2006 Enterprise Management Associates, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
  3. 3. CA Product Brief ..................................................................................................................................................................................23 Context and Market Focus ............................................................................................................................................................23 Concept, Product Information and Description ......................................................................................................................23 Distinguishing Features and Key Benefits..................................................................................................................................24 Target Verticals ................................................................................................................................................................................25 Multi-Vendor and Standards Directions .....................................................................................................................................25 EMA’s Perspective ...........................................................................................................................................................................26 CodeMesh Product Brief ....................................................................................................................................................................27 Context and Market Focus ............................................................................................................................................................27 Concept, Product Information and Description ......................................................................................................................27 Distinguishing Features and Key Benefits..................................................................................................................................28 Target Verticals ................................................................................................................................................................................29 Multi-Vendor and Standards Directions .....................................................................................................................................29 EMA’s Perspective ...........................................................................................................................................................................29 eG Innovations Product Brief ............................................................................................................................................................30 Context and Market Focus ............................................................................................................................................................30 Concept, Product Information and Description ......................................................................................................................30 Distinguishing Features and Key Benefits..................................................................................................................................31 Target Verticals ................................................................................................................................................................................32 Multi-Vendor and Standards Directions .....................................................................................................................................32 EMA’s Perspective ...........................................................................................................................................................................33 Forum Systems Product Brief ...........................................................................................................................................................34 Context and Market Focus ............................................................................................................................................................34 Concept, Product Information and Description ......................................................................................................................34 Distinguishing Features and Key Benefits..................................................................................................................................35 Target Verticals ................................................................................................................................................................................36 Multi-Vendor and Standards Directions .....................................................................................................................................37 EMA’s Perspective ...........................................................................................................................................................................38 Hewlett-Packard Product Brief ..........................................................................................................................................................39 Context and Market Focus ............................................................................................................................................................39 Concept, Product Information and Description ......................................................................................................................39 Distinguishing Features and Key Benefits..................................................................................................................................42 Target Verticals ................................................................................................................................................................................42 Multi-Vendor and Standards Directions .....................................................................................................................................42 EMA’s Perspective ...........................................................................................................................................................................43 SOA Market and Products 2006: Current State, Future Directions ©2006 Enterprise Management Associates, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
  4. 4. IBM Product Brief ................................................................................................................................................................................44 Context and Market Focus ............................................................................................................................................................44 Concept, Product Information and Description ......................................................................................................................44 Distinguishing Features and Key Benefits..................................................................................................................................45 Target Verticals ................................................................................................................................................................................45 Multi-Vendor and Standards Directions .....................................................................................................................................46 EMA’s Perspective ...........................................................................................................................................................................46 Infravio Product Brief ..........................................................................................................................................................................47 Context and Market Focus ............................................................................................................................................................47 Concept, Product Information and Description ......................................................................................................................47 Distinguishing Features and Key Benefits..................................................................................................................................49 Target Verticals ................................................................................................................................................................................49 Multi-Vendor and Standards Directions .....................................................................................................................................49 EMA’s Perspective ...........................................................................................................................................................................50 LogicLibrary Product Brief .................................................................................................................................................................51 Context and Market Focus ............................................................................................................................................................51 Concept, Product Information and Description ......................................................................................................................51 Distinguishing Features and Key Benefits..................................................................................................................................51 Target Verticals ................................................................................................................................................................................52 Multi-Vendor and Standards Directions .....................................................................................................................................52 EMA’s Perspective ...........................................................................................................................................................................53 Mindreef Product Brief .......................................................................................................................................................................54 Context and Market Focus ............................................................................................................................................................54 Concept, Product Information and Description ......................................................................................................................54 Distinguishing Features and Key Benefits..................................................................................................................................55 Target Verticals ................................................................................................................................................................................56 Multi-Vendor and Standards Directions .....................................................................................................................................56 EMA’s Perspective ...........................................................................................................................................................................56 OpTier Product Brief ...........................................................................................................................................................................57 Context and Market Focus ............................................................................................................................................................57 Concept, Product Information and Description ......................................................................................................................57 Distinguishing Features and Key Benefits..................................................................................................................................58 Target Verticals ................................................................................................................................................................................59 Multi-Vendor and Standards Directions .....................................................................................................................................59 EMA’s Perspective ...........................................................................................................................................................................60 SOA Market and Products 2006: Current State, Future Directions ©2006 Enterprise Management Associates, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
  5. 5. Reactivity Product Brief .....................................................................................................................................................................61 Context and Market Focus ............................................................................................................................................................61 Concept, Product Information and Description ......................................................................................................................61 Distinguishing Features and Key Benefits..................................................................................................................................62 Target Verticals ................................................................................................................................................................................63 Multi-Vendor and Standards Directions .....................................................................................................................................63 EMA’s Perspective ...........................................................................................................................................................................64 SOA Software Product Brief ..............................................................................................................................................................65 Context and Market Focus ............................................................................................................................................................65 Concept, Product Information and Description ......................................................................................................................65 Distinguishing Features and Key Benefits..................................................................................................................................66 Target Verticals ................................................................................................................................................................................68 Multi-Vendor and Standards Directions .....................................................................................................................................68 EMA’s Perspective ...........................................................................................................................................................................69 Symantec Product Brief ......................................................................................................................................................................70 Context and Market Focus ............................................................................................................................................................70 Concept, Product Information and Description ......................................................................................................................70 Distinguishing Features and Key Benefits..................................................................................................................................71 Target Verticals ................................................................................................................................................................................71 Multi-Vendor and Standards Directions .....................................................................................................................................71 EMA’s Perspective ...........................................................................................................................................................................72 VersionOne Product Brief ..................................................................................................................................................................73 Context and Market Focus ............................................................................................................................................................73 Concept, Product Information and Description ......................................................................................................................73 Distinguishing Features and Key Benefits..................................................................................................................................74 Target Verticals ................................................................................................................................................................................75 Multi-Vendor and Standards Directions .....................................................................................................................................75 EMA’s Perspective ...........................................................................................................................................................................75 webMethods Product Brief .................................................................................................................................................................76 Context and Market Focus ............................................................................................................................................................76 Concept, Product Information and Description ......................................................................................................................76 Distinguishing Features and Key Benefits..................................................................................................................................77 Target Verticals ................................................................................................................................................................................79 Multi-Vendor and Standards Directions .....................................................................................................................................79 EMA’s Perspective ...........................................................................................................................................................................80 SOA Market and Products 2006: Current State, Future Directions ©2006 Enterprise Management Associates, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
  6. 6. Additional Vendors of Interest – Thumbnail Sketches .................................................................................................................81 Vendor Generations: Architecture, Genetics and the Future .......................................................................................................84 Conclusions/Looking ahead ...............................................................................................................................................................85 SOA Market and Products 2006: Current State, Future Directions ©2006 Enterprise Management Associates, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
  7. 7. Executive Summary EMA’s foray into the Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) solutions space builds on years of research covering the evolution of Information Technology (IT). The past ten years have been a particularly interesting time span as they have ushered in the Internet era, the proliferation of business web applications, the emergence of company websites as the primary storefront for many leading technology companies and, finally, the integration era. Due to technology advance- ments over time and business requirements driven by the need to interact electronically with customers, vendors and business partners, integration has become key to doing business in today’s highly interactive business climate. The integration space has actually developed in tandem with the rest of technology. During the mid 90’s and early 2000’s, complex technology integrations were accomplished via custom coding, middleware and proprietary platforms. These early efforts, viewed primarily as one-off projects and usually requiring custom consulting by integration specialists, were both time-consuming and expensive. Many of these projects were centered around Electronic Data Interchange (EDI) implementations, enabling companies to exchange documents such as orders and invoices. Once the conduit between companies was opened, it was too late to mend the hole in the dike. The information flow between companies grew from a trickle to a torrent and the industry began to see that it was simply too expensive to tackle each integration as a separate and unique project. So the first serious steps on the long road to standards develop- ment were almost parallel to these integration efforts. SOA is the logical next step in this natural evolution. Technology needed an easier way to integrate and SOA has proved to be a serious contender in the scramble for an answer. The first paper in this series, entitled Service Oriented Architectures: Coming of Age in the Enterprise and the Marketplace, pub- lished by EMA during the first quarter of 2006, discussed this evolution in detail. This is the second paper in the series and will continue where that paper left off. In this paper, we will detail the particular challenges that SOA brings to the product marketplace and highlight how today’s products are answering these challenges. As examples of what is current in this market, this paper includes in-depth product briefs on a representative sample of products. The third and final paper in the series, entitled SOA: a View From the Trenches, will be available early Q3, 2006. It will explore the maturity level of SOA from the enterprise IT perspective, and will present early-adopter case studies as well as roadmaps for SOA adoption and product evolution. One of the major themes of this series is the convergence of technologies into a single integrated fabric. Technologies that were previously considered to be separate, siloed entities, such as Unix and Windows, databases and networks, load balancers and web servers, have become a single evolving entity. This convergence has initiated massive changes in terms of the people, processes and technologies required to manage the integrated ecosystem. This ecosystem is the foundation for SOA. SOA starts where technology ends and, although there are certainly touch points between the two, they are transparent to the vast majority of users benefiting from SOA’s agility and flexibility. This paper addresses those touch points – they are key factors in determining the products and solution sets that are required to address SOA in the marketplace. It also discusses the challenges that SOA brings to the technology marketplace in detail, and hopefully sheds light on both the issues that need to be addressed and how today’s technology solutions are solving them. Today’s IT industry is increasingly progressing beyond technology and impacting the life of the average non-technical user as never before. In an extraordinarily short time span, IT has moved beyond being intrinsic to business and has become intrinsic to life as we know it. To continue this evolution and insure that today’s ubiquitous technology systems are always there and always on requires a sound technology base. The vendors included in this brief help provide that base and the technology they deliver enables this evolution to continue. Methodology To gather information for this series, EMA talked with over 30 vendors in depth and had related discussions with many more. In an effort to present a broad overview of the technologies being used to enable and manage SOA, we Page SOA Market and Products 2006: Current State, Future Directions ©2006 Enterprise Management Associates, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
  8. 8. have included vendors whose products touch all points in the SOA lifecycle. We have covered a range of products that address the SOA component development lifecycle, operational functionality such as Enterprise Service Buses (ESBs), Extensible Markup Language (XML) acceleration and security offerings, and application and performance management products and suites. Two key areas we have not addressed in detail are Configuration Management Database (CMDB) and security products. EMA sees the CMDB as being increasingly fundamental to SOA availability and performance management, and we will discuss the reasons why in some detail later in this paper. However, EMA has covered CMDB products extensively in previous research reports, most notably the landmark three-part CMDB series published during 2005. Providing more detail on these products in this paper would be largely redundant. Security is also a fundamental issue and the challenges to securing SOA business services will be enormous. So, although we will touch on security products in the vendor briefs, we believe that SOA security is an important topic on its own that deserves its own analysis at a later date. Summary of Conclusions • Although Web Services are now mainstream, with most companies using at least some Web Services standards and technologies in-house, SOA is still early state. However, the wave is cresting, has momentum built behind it, and will become a flood in the next few years. • A convergence of technology disciplines is enabling the emergence of SOA. Enterprise management vendors have to address this convergence, as well as the fluid relationships between SOA services and technology, to be successful in the “new” enterprise management marketplace. • A dichotomy exists between traditional enterprise management vendors and newer, standards based entries to the marketplace due to differences in architecture, standards adoption and product interoperability philosophies. • Vendors writing or rewriting their applications as SOA and/or Web Services implementations will be best positioned to manage composite transactions going forward. SOA-specific Semantics and Concepts The first paper in this series set the stage for the remaining papers by establishing a base starting point for many of the concepts that are foundational for the remainder of the series. Since that foundation has already been laid, this paper won’t repeat that material in detail. However, because the concepts outlined in that paper are so critical to understanding many of the key ideas presented in this one, we’ll highlight those that are germane to the discussion that follows. These highlights will establish a semantic basis for the remainder of the paper. • Software components, also called services, are the building blocks of SOAs: SOA transactions are composed of components (services) that are connected together, or orchestrated, into SOA business transactions and applications. • From the SOA perspective, services are abstracted from technology: SOA can be described as a sort of “virtualized” ecosys- tem in that the technical complexity underlying business services is abstracted from the services themselves. This is probably the primary identifier of SOA implementations. Many Web Services applications are tightly bound, or coupled, to the underlying technology, typically by IP addresses. True SOA services are not. They are loosely coupled and discovered by consumers via queries to a centralized registry. • SOA and Web Services two different animals: Web Services is a catch-all term that is currently being used to cover everything but the proverbial kitchen sink. Definitions cover the spectrum between simple application services running as part of a web transaction to full implementation of an SOA-based business service. The term is also being used to describe a set of standards in various stages of specification that are designed to support compos- ite and heterogeneous transactions running over the web. From our perspective, Web Services refer to a set of standards as well as to web-based business applications that leverage these standards. SOA Market and Products 2006: Current State, Future Directions Page 2 ©2006 Enterprise Management Associates, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
  9. 9. In terms of real-life implementation, however, there can be Web Services implementations of SOA as well as SOA implementations built with Web Services. However, both can be built without the other. For example, SOA implementations don’t have to run over Web Services standards – they can be built over Common Object Request Broker Architecture (CORBA) or Message-Oriented Middleware systems such as the IBM MQ Series. In fact, ESBs are the implementation methodology of choice for many of today’s production grade SOAs and many ESBs have evolved from older Enterprise Application Integration (EAI) platforms that emerged before Web Services standards were viable. Likewise, many Web Services-based business applications are tightly coupled to underlying technology and lack the fluidity characteristic of SOA services. Regarding standards, although specific Web Services standards, such as XML, have been significant enablers of SOA, others, such as Software Component Architecture (SCA) are on the drawing board but not yet ready for prime time. • SOAs are primarily designed for machine-to-machine communications: Typically, no humans are in the SOA business service loop per se, although the output from a SOA-based business service may be presented in a human-readable graphical interface when the transaction is complete. • SOA services are built over multiple heterogeneous technologies and are fined-grained: SOA implementations are, in effect, virtualized environments and are designed to execute across diverse and heterogeneous technolo- gies. Unfortunately, this diversity is not necessarily designed into the underlying technology. So, for example, programs written in .NET and those written in Java can’t natively “talk” to one another. For this reason, SOA rollouts require some way to “translate” between technologies. Software products that perform these transla- tions are called adapters. In addition, as part of their design, software components should be fine-grained, meaning that they perform a well-defined, discrete function. This maximizes the potential for component reuse. For example, a software routine with one simple function, such as converting Julian dates to Gregorian dates, is more easily reused than a long-running service that determines whether a customer is eligible for a mortgage. • Some way of assembling components into business services is required: Because they are fine-grained, SOA components are virtually useless on their own. Because of this, there has to be some way of assembling fine- grained services into multi-step business functions, such as determining mortgage eligibility. Orchestration is the process of connecting components into SOA business transactions. • Execution of business services in an SOA requires unique platforms and technologies: For an SOA to actu- ally execute in an operations environment, all of the functionality described has to work together in context. Assuring optimal performance and availability for each SOA component as well as for business services built using those components requires a new approach to managing enterprise services. • SOA execution can go beyond the borders of an organization’s IT reach: We have been moving in this direc- tion for years, starting in the 90’s with EDI and later with EAI and Business to Business (B2B). However, SOA takes this characteristic to a new level, because business services built over SOA can include components that exist outside a company’s sphere of control. So, if an SOA transaction includes 75 discrete SOA services linked together, or orchestrated, into a single business transaction, any number of these discrete SOA services can be outside a particular organization’s IT infrastructure. Currently, this is often impractical for performance reasons; however it will likely increasingly become the case as integrations become more and more robust. Big Challenges, Big Opportunities SOA brings with it tremendous opportunities in a wide-open marketplace. Estimates are that SOA spending worldwide on technology and services will be between $15 and $40 billion dollars, depending on who is estimating, during the next five years. Vendors and consulting firms alike are gearing up for a slice of this pie and there will clearly be a lot of room for both, with between 30% and 70% of organizations, again depending on who is doing the counting, indicating that Page SOA Market and Products 2006: Current State, Future Directions ©2006 Enterprise Management Associates, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
  10. 10. they plan to roll out SOA initiatives during 2006. SOA clearly brings with it enormous revenue potential, and vendors, including giants such as HP and IBM, are girding their loins to fight it out in the marketplace. Established vendors and upstarts alike see SOA as the next great opportunity. The Internet infrastructure is now produc- tion grade, networks are world class, software development is disciplined, and most organizations have hardened their processes to incorporate IT Infrastructure Library (ITIL) concepts and Sarbanes-Oxley requirements. Everything is poised and ready, and consensus across the board is that the SOA market will continue to expand over the next several years. So let’s look deeper into how SOA’s specific characteristics translate into product requirements and opportunities. Components as Building Blocks At their simplest, SOA business services are collections of software components orchestrated sequentially to perform a business process. The components that are the granular basis for SOAs are still, for the most part, created in-house by an organization’s own development team, possibly in conjunction with services organizations. The entire development process around SOA components has its own unique challenges. In SOAs, development processes have to be more disciplined than they have been in the past, primarily because SOA implementations can quickly spiral out of control if not governed. SOA components need to be timed correctly, since for the lack of one component, it may be impossible to complete a business service roll-out. This implies a requirement for products such those supplied by VersionOne, profiled in this paper, that help organizations plan, track and report on each step in the iterative development lifecycle. One of the big selling points for Service Oriented Architectures is that they enable companies to reuse their legacy code by “wrapping” it in a metadata “wrapper.” Wrapped code can then be used as SOA services/components. However, this wrapping process isn’t simple and the process of determining which pieces of a 500,000 line COBOL program should be wrapped and which should be discarded isn’t a trivial task. HP has addressed this opportunity with a combination of products and services packaged as HP Application Modernization Services. HP Consulting works with companies to help them prioritize the value of legacy programs, analyze key code, and determine which software routines provide the best business value as wrapped code and which routines should simply be rewritten. Release management, the process of releasing software into the production environment, also has implications unique to SOA. Release of new or modified components has to be very closely tracked so they are timed to coincide with the contracts that exist between SOA services. As SOA components bind with one another, they share their contracts, which typically include a service lease. The lease specifies that the service will be available in its specified form for the duration of that time period. So it is critical that service leases and contracts be visible to the development and deployment cycles so that new releases are timed to coincide with lease expirations. Companies that have already addressed release manage- ment in ITIL initiatives will have a foundation for this new requirement. Those who have not may require consulting services as well as products that address the release management function. Virtualized Business Services This characteristic is a key one in understanding SOA management challenges, as well as in understanding why the CMDB is, and will continue to become, increasingly significant from the enterprise management perspective. The short story is that most of today’s management products are designed to manage applications that are tightly coupled to underlying infrastructure. Tight coupling makes mapping applications to technology, and thereby enabling management of “applications” as collections of “devices,” relatively simple. However, the introduction of fluid business transactions composed of components that can, in fact, migrate all over the technology map without affecting the high level business service, is a major gap in these products. Although SOA business transactions have only a virtualized relationship to underlying technology, management products have to understand the physical relationship. Without an understanding of application to technology mappings, manage- ment tools can manage technology, but not business services. Business Service Management (BSM) goes beyond simple SOA Market and Products 2006: Current State, Future Directions Page ©2006 Enterprise Management Associates, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
  11. 11. management of devices. It provides a foundation for transaction performance, fault, and service level management and gives IT the capability to see the IT ecosystem from the user’s perspective. BSM has gone beyond being simply a buzz- word and is now the bar against which enterprise management products are measured. Without the ability to model the critical connection between IT and the business, management of SOA ecosystems isn’t possible. Many traditional enterprise management products solve this problem – the mapping of applications to technology – by requiring technicians to manually map these relationships. This works in tightly bound systems, but becomes unmanage- able as SOA implementations proliferate. The task of manually mapping transactions to technology becomes impractical when the transactions consist of execution steps that are mapped at runtime. In large IT environments with thousands of server nodes, manual mapping is almost impossible. Virtually all of the long-established enterprise management vendors have engineered their products for the relatively static business service environments of the past. In other words, most enterprise management products on the market today rely on a defined, tightly coupled relationship between applications and the servers they are running on. However, vendors clearly understand this problem and some are beginning to address it. The need to add this transaction context dimension to traditional vertical (device-oriented) and horizontal (transaction-oriented) dimensions of the infrastructure for management purposes introduces the concept of a multidimensional, transaction-aware fabric. Some of the newer entries in the marketplace squarely tackle this problem, and are solving it in some ingenious ways. These products “watch” transactions as they traverse infrastructure, then use application signatures and other applica- tion discovery technologies to identify applications and transaction types. They then automatically create mappings of transactions to underlying infrastructure and display them in various graphical views. Products in this category include AmberPoint, Collation, OpTier, Tideway, mValent, Relicore, and Troux. It isn’t a coincidence that there have been multiple acquisitions in this market the past 6-9 months, as established enter- prise management vendors are well aware of this requirement. Collation and Relicore have recently been acquired by IBM and Symantec respectively, and products in this category will continue to be prime acquisition targets for exactly the reasons outlined above. This same driver will also cement the place of the CMDB as the repository of record for SOA management. Although there are multiple ways to monitor end-to-end SOA transactions, including via intelligent agents, the analysis of XML messages, and packet sniffing, the end result is that information gathered in this way has to go somewhere, and that will likely be the federated CMDB. The increasing importance of the CMDB will justify the ITIL assertion that the CMDB is central to providing optimal IT services. Many industry observers have debated whether this requirement was “real” or not, but as SOA continues to grow, vendors that provide tools to populate CMDBs, such as Altiris and others, will see their solutions being increasingly used for this purpose. Page SOA Market and Products 2006: Current State, Future Directions ©2006 Enterprise Management Associates, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
  12. 12. Figure 1 describes the concept of a transaction-aware fabric in more detail, in the context of the EMA Semantic Model. This model describes EMA’s view of relationships between the many levels of technology that comprise the IT ecosys- tem. It incorporates the idea of a centralized data store populated by metrics from infrastructure monitoring devices. Traditionally, in this model, the flow of information has been from the device management software upwards into the data store, or CMDB. SOA introduces the need for intelligence to also be pushed from the business process layer down, in effect connecting business services to underlying infrastructure. Transaction-oriented application management products such as those described above collect intelligence from automated business processes to create end-to-end transaction maps and, ideally, to push that intelligence downward into the CMDB as well. Business External IT Services Management Customer Management Transaction context data collected via: XML Parsing Application Signatures Application Autodiscovery Management Information Presentation Intelligent Correlation, etc. Business Processes IT Service Business Policies Policies Object Data Store Data DBMS Infrastructure Integration with Infrastructure Instrumentation External Systems Auto Discovery Infrastructure Metrics Infrastructure EMA Semantic Model with Transaction Context Information Figure 1: Transaction-aware fabric From the EMA perspective, this requirement could spawn new products that are, in effect, massive CMDB correlation engines. These products would intelligently correlate desktop configuration data from the Altiris CMDB, for example, with device information from IBM Tivoli’s Confederated CMDB (CCMD), with transaction information from OpTier into a powerful, real-time application mapping engine. Such products would provide an always-accurate model of the relationships between business services and technology in an automated fashion. This would be the ideal foundation for SOA monitoring and it is likely that marketplace leaders see this as well. However, EMA has not encountered any such products as of yet. SOA Market and Products 2006: Current State, Future Directions Page 6 ©2006 Enterprise Management Associates, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
  13. 13. Machine to Machine Communications Traditional interactive business applications mix human interaction with technology. In these models, even if an organi- zation lacks tools to manage their applications, “human application monitors” will undoubtedly pick up the phone and let IT know when there is a problem. If the payroll department can’t run payroll checks, for example, it is very obvious to the payroll clerk on payday. Even if IT doesn’t have tools in place to proactively monitor the payroll system, the clerk can, and undoubtedly will, call the Service Desk to report the problem. For some companies, the telephone is still the enterprise management product of choice. SOA business applications, on the other hand, are roughly similar to traditional batch applications, in the sense that they are designed to interact with one another, not with humans. An example might be an SOA transaction running on Amazon.com. When we place an order for a book, we navigate through a series of screens to place our order and, once the order is actually complete, we see a confirmation screen. The processes that happen “behind the scenes” between the time the order is placed and the time the confirmation is displayed, in other words the processing we don’t see, can be implemented via SOA. In models like this, without products to detect the fact that the transaction hasn’t successfully completed, a company might never know that customers can’t buy stocks through their web portal. In fact, one of the vendors interviewed for this paper reported that one of their customers, Ajax hotels (name changed to protect the innocent), had exactly this problem and wasn’t aware of it until they installed the vendor’s monitoring products. Ajax reservations come into the central reservation system via multiple channels, one of which is their distributed hotels. When Ajax installed software to monitor their composite transactions, they noticed a peculiar gap in the reservation stream. Although Ajax received a fairly constant stream of new reservations from their Orlando, San Francisco and Washington D.C. hotels, there were no reservations coming into the central system from their Denver hotel. Investigation proved that the transactions from the Denver hotel were being routed across a server that was no longer in their infra- structure. Reservations had not been working from that particular office for over six months. How much business and customer goodwill did they lose in that time span? The point here is that since the inner workings of SOA are opaque to the human observer, the potential exists for perfor- mance and availability problems to go undetected virtually indefinitely. To mitigate this risk, these systems require enter- prise management solutions that can take the place of humans and telephones as the ultimate technology watchdogs. Heterogeneity SOA business transactions are carefree. They aren’t concerned about whether the components comprising them are run- ning on Windows or Linux or are written in COBOL or .NET. They don’t have to care because the middleware running underneath the services translates between technologies. ESBs provide one way to do these translations. ESBs have built-in adapters for many applications and technologies, such as SAP, Java beans, or C++ components. ESB specifications include lists of products they integrate with, and these integrations are a major reason why ESBs are so popular in the marketplace – they significantly reduce the time and technical expertise required to bring SOA implementations to production. Companies such as webMethods and IBM, both profiled in this paper, market ESB products. There are integration options other than ESBs, however, particularly for companies with skilled development staff. Vendors such as CodeMesh, also profiled in this paper, market pre-built adapters that reduce the need for custom coding. Alternatively, technology bindings can be custom-created by highly skilled integration programmers. At some point, standards will be in place to address this issue, and, as a matter of fact, IBM, BEA Systems, Oracle and SAP are currently collaborating on just such a standard. The SCA standard will provide adapters that enable diverse technologies to communicate with one another. However, this standard is still early state, and in the short to mid-term, this translation process will continue to rely on either custom coding or vendor provided, pre-built software adapters specifically written for this purpose. Page SOA Market and Products 2006: Current State, Future Directions ©2006 Enterprise Management Associates, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
  14. 14. Orchestration The orchestration function is where components are assembled into business processes. In the long term, as Web Services standards grow more robust, both SCA and Business Process Execution Language (BPEL) will make the assembly process easier and less technical. Currently, however, this function is a laborious technical task requiring either in-depth integration talent or an Enterprise Service Bus. ESB functionality typically includes business process assembly tools. This process adds to our list of vendor product requirements. As previously discussed, software components in SOA systems are designed to perform well-defined, discrete functions so they can be re-used by multiple business services. Realistically, however, one of the major issues around component reuse is that once developed, they are often used only once. One reason for this is that companies lack good indexing products that help technology analysts understand: • What components are available • What each component does • What data the component requires for input • What data the component returns This introduces an additional requirement for products, including indexes and repositories, with human-readable visibility to available components and their functionality. This could consist of a graphical view of SOA registries and repositories, which in turn could be part of the federated CMDB. Assembly tools are also part of this wish list. These products would give Business Analysts the ability to copy and paste components into business service execution streams, and then export the streams into ESBs or lightweight SOA runtime frameworks. SOA Runtime Once all of the pieces of an SOA are in place, there has to be some way to convert business service specifications into running, viable SOA services. We have already discussed ESBs in terms of their relationship to the translation function and to orchestration. Today, ESBs are key runtime platforms. ESBs are all-encompassing products that are “SOA in a box” solutions. They incorporate all of the pieces required to actually bring SOA to production, and will be discussed in detail later in this section. There are other operational products of interest here as well, however. Registries, sometimes also called brokers or directories, are network-accessible information stores listing available com- ponents along with their contracts and service leases. They are foundational to real-time SOA business applications because they provide the foundation for discovery and loose coupling. Using UDDI, SOA services can locate one another by reading published Web Services Description Language (WSDL) information. This inherent discovery process enables fluid transactions with minimal visibility to the specifics of infrastructure. SOA Software, Infravio, Systinet and LogicLibrary all produce registry products. A repository stores runtime metadata such as policies. Policies act as parameters that tailor the way in which a given service component functions. Policy-based repositories can be key SOA enablers because they enable the reuse of com- ponents for different purposes. They help tailor the component to function within similar but slightly different business process scenarios. Infravio and LogicLibrary are examples of repository products profiled in this paper. SOA Market and Products 2006: Current State, Future Directions Page ©2006 Enterprise Management Associates, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
  15. 15. The complex process of actually running an SOA is roughly analogous to the operating system underlying traditional applications. Like Outlook, or SAP, or an internet browser, SOA applications require technology that brings all of its ele- ments together and coordinates them to perform as a single entity. There are multiple ways to achieve this. Many produc- tion grade SOAs today run over ESBs, because they incorporate a pre-built platform that provides service connectivity, translation, and orchestration functionality out of the box. A simplified ESB is illustrated in Figure 2. In this hypothetical stock order, the request is sent into the ESB via an HTTP request from a Web browser. The ESB acts as a connector that binds the services together in sequence. The first step in the sequence is to translate the request into messages that can be understood by the various components in the transaction. Then, the ESB orchestrates the transac- tion by executing each component in turn as a separate step, starting with the account balance check and ending with the confirmation. Timing is enforced as the ESB verifies that each step completes before the next is started. The ESB marks the transaction as complete once a confirmation is generated. Although this process seems quite simple, without an ESB or a similar product, each of these steps would have to be coded by an integration programmer, and further, any similar transactions would have to be manually coded as well. With an ESB, the coding is already done and additional transactions can be assembled simply by adding them to another business process flow on the ESB. Hypothetical Stock Trading Transaction Deduct from Log Translation Account Transaction Stock 1 2 3 4 5 6 HTTP Purchase Request/Reply Order ESB Account Purchase Generate Balance Stock Confirmation Check Figure 2: ESB Other products in the runtime operations category are XML accelerators, such as the Reactivity products profiled in this paper, and security products such as those provided by Forum Systems. Computing Beyond Organizational Borders Traditional monitoring and management products are designed to address a single organization’s infrastructure, and most solutions in the marketplace today were designed to this scope. SOA introduces a new wrinkle to this problem, in that SOA transactions can and do execute across the extranet. This introduces a whole array of challenges including: • Security, authentication and related issues: As an industry, we are still far from solving the issue of securing the enterprise. With the additional requirement of managing execution environments outside the organization’s sphere of control, security becomes even more problematical. Earlier in this paper, we mentioned that security is a major issue for SOAs and that the subject warrants its own paper. Deferring that discussion until a later date isn’t a cop-out; it is an unfortunate reality as this subject is far too complex to adequately discuss in a paper of this length. Page SOA Market and Products 2006: Current State, Future Directions ©2006 Enterprise Management Associates, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
  16. 16. That being said, significant security functionality is being provided by companies like Forum System. Forum uses very sophisticated XML parsing algorithms to monitor messaging within SOA environments and provides trust management, threat protection and information assurance capabilities. In addition, with Forum’s acquisition of Kenai in February of 2006, Forum also acquired the capability to test the security of an organization for poten- tial security threats. • Billing for component usage: This same concept will drive new billing systems, as companies subscribe to “com- ponents for hire.” Certain specialized services may become available as SOA services on a fee per access basis. The introduction of such a model will require billing systems similar to those already in existence for cell phone services, with the ability to account for fractions of a given transaction that run over fee-based components. • Managing transactions across organizational borders: Obviously the successful execution of a business transac- tion in which 75 components must execute in concert with one another depends on optimal performance and availability of all 75 components. The question as to how SOA business services distributed across infrastructure managed by multiple companies are to be managed is still unanswered. Critical Web Services Standards Still in Development In the first paper of this series, we discussed Web Services standards, particularly those standards that are currently in common use, in detail. These included WSDL, Universal Description, Discovery, and Integration (UDDI), Simple Object Access Protocol (SOAP), Extensible Markup Language (XML) and other Web Services standards that are in vary- ing stages of development. In this paper, we’ll talk about some promising standards that aren’t yet ready for prime time. Standards development is a key issue because standards will theoretically simplify SOA deployment and enable future technology advances Unfortunately, it seems that standards development is still too often a cat fight. There is a lot of noise, the fur flies, and all you can see is a big cloud of dust. Eventually, a standard, or two competing standards, emerge from the chaos and the industry takes another halting step forward. Despite the lessons of history, we still see vendor cartels insisting on developing and supporting their own standards regardless of what the rest of the industry is doing. That being said, standards continue to progress and vendors as a whole have a much more significant investment in standards development than in past years. This is especially true for vendors that have emerged fairly recently, particu- larly since the mid to late 90’s. For the most part, these vendors have a very significant investment in standards and partnerships. Infravio, for example, one of the vendors profiled later in this paper, has been heavily involved in standards develop- ment and an Infravio senior executive is the Chair of the Organization for the Advancement of Structured Information Standards (OASIS) SOA Adoption Blueprints Technical Committee. Reactivity, another vendor profiled, is co-author of WS-Security, WS-Trust, WS-Federation and many other standards. Even long established vendors are realizing that, for the most part, customers are no longer investing in proprietary products simply because a big vendor tells them that’s the best choice. Products that are not standards-based and don’t interoperate with other products just aren’t a good invest- ment in today’s diverse technology marketplace. Three key standards currently under review include specifications for standardized technology adapters, exchange of data between services with dissimilar data formats, and orchestration. These standards include: • Service Component Architecture (SCA): Today, the chore of actually assembling an SOA business service is complex. Services may be composed of hundreds of technology components scattered across a company’s IT infrastruc- ture and, in many cases, in the extranet as well. The actual “knitting together” of components into business processes is a tedious technical task, requiring in-depth knowledge of network protocols, databases, Application Program Interfaces (APIs), web technology and infrastructure architecture. In lieu of binding products such as the CodeMesh products profiled in this paper, or the built-in bindings provided by an enterprise-grade ESB, the expense involved in rolling out SOA deployments can limit their number and size. SOA Market and Products 2006: Current State, Future Directions Page 0 ©2006 Enterprise Management Associates, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
  17. 17. SCA will simplify this process by providing standardized bindings that eliminate much of the technical expertise required to assemble business services. The vision is that the service assembly process will move from technol- ogy experts to business experts, such as Business Analysts. The specification follows emerging best practice by separating middleware programming dependencies from business logic, eliminating the need to code to APIs. If this sounds too good to be true, it is. SCA is still early state and requires significant work prior to submission. Currently, Java and C++ bindings exist, and other languages will follow. • Service Data Objects (SDO): SDO describes a standard for rendering data in a unified way. The proposed SDO standard, originally proposed jointly by BEA and IBM, is farther along in the approval process than SCA and the specification has now iterated through numerous reviews. SDO simplifies access to data from dissimilar data stores and, like SCA, supports multiple languages. This facilitates data exchange and access between services with unlike data formats, helping to eliminate the current requirement for custom programming to do so. • BPEL: Business Process Execution Language provides a means to simplify the orchestration activity by specify- ing protocols for creating business services and modeling interactions between components. This specification, first introduced in 2002, still has not been approved by OASIS. Although BPEL is a complex specification, it appears as though there are several reasons for the delay. One is inter-vendor wrangling, which is no big surprise. The specification process initially identified 200+ issues, or areas of disagreement, which has now been reduced to several dozen. In the meantime, BPEL has become a de facto standard, since its widespread use in product development has become standard by use if not in fact. Nevertheless, as BPEL becomes increasingly robust, it will be another enabler for the lightweight SOA frameworks that will, more than likely, eventually replace today’s ESB platforms. Page SOA Market and Products 2006: Current State, Future Directions ©2006 Enterprise Management Associates, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
  18. 18. Product Categories Figure 3 shows a high level SOA product stack, with all of the vendors profiled in this paper classified within a particular product group. To give a comprehensive overview of the current state of the market, this paper addresses representative products from each of these categories by including either in-depth product briefs or thumbnail sketches. Where there are products within a vendor’s solution set that overlap multiple categories, we classified the vendor as being in either the predominant category or the product suite group. Subsequent research will continue to profile additional vendors. SOA Categories SOA Functions SOA Products Product Suites Multi-function Suites BEA, Hewlett-Packard, IBM, Oracle, Systinet, TIBCO, SOA Software Monitoring and Management Performance, Fault Management, Actional, AmberPoint, BMC, CA, Service Level Management Cisco, eG Innovations, OpTier, and Others Relicore, RTO Runtime Solutions ESB, Broker, SB, Registry, Altiris, Blue Titan, Forum Systems, Repository, Security and Infravio, Reactivity, Sonic Software, XML Acceleration webMethods Orchestration Business Process Assembly, CodeMesh Bindings Component Management Component Development, LogicLibrary, MindReef, Management, VersionOne Testing and Deployment Figure 3: SOA Categories, Functions and Products Product Briefs With the product briefs in this section, EMA’s intent is to include representative samples from each product category that, when taken together, can give a broad view of the types of products available in today’s marketplace. The “Context and Market Focus” section in each brief sets the stage for how EMA sees the product as being positioned in the overall SOA strategy for enterprise organizations. The “EMA Perspective” section is a wrap-up of our product review. Hopefully, these product profiles will shed additional light on the state of today’s market and the ways in which vendors are address- ing the challenges we have described. Although there are many more good products in each category in the marketplace today, we were, of course, unable to profile all of them. EMA will continue to profile additional products as time goes on. SOA Market and Products 2006: Current State, Future Directions Page 2 ©2006 Enterprise Management Associates, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
  19. 19. Altiris Product Brief Highlights Context and Market Focus Vendor Name: Altiris Inc. Altiris is traditionally associated in the marketplace with software distribution and that is definitely still a key focus. However, there Contact Name: Richard Ashe are some additional aspects of the Altiris solution set, architec- Telephone Number: 713-849-9642 ture and product direction that point to a broader applicability to Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) as well. Email Address: richard.ashe@altiris.com From the solution perspective, Altiris offers component manage- URL: www.altiris.com ment capabilities as well as enterprise management foundation as Date Founded: 1998 part of a federated Configuration Management Database (CMDB). Architecture-wise, Altiris is built over a componentized, .NET Number of Employees: 850+ architecture that leverages industry standards and Application Availability: All products (with the excep- Program Interfaces (APIs). This architecture not only gives Altiris tion of Deployment Server and Task Server) the ability to extend the functionality of their solutions at will, currently available. Task Server availability is but also provides easy integration with other products in the mar- expected Q2 of 2006, Deployment Server ketplace, as well as with enterprise SOAs. In terms of product availability is expected Q3 of 2006. direction, Altiris’ focus on software virtualization, particularly the Software Virtualization Solution 2.0 product (SVS), announced in late 2005, brings with it tantalizing possibilities in terms of virtualized deployment of SOA components. As of the writing of this paper, SVS is available for desktop only. However, this virtualized capability will soon be extended to the server as well, and this will provide some exciting possibilities for real-time deployment of SOA components, as well as some very intriguing SOA management challenges. Concept, Product Information and Description Product Product Description How Long in Market? Altiris Inventory Solution Automates the process of creating Since 2002 a CMDB, provides an accurate and thorough inventory of desktops, servers, notebooks, and handheld devices. Altiris Software Delivery Solution Policy-based software distribution 2002 for applications and other software change packages. Altiris Helpdesk Provides a single console to capture 2004 caller (call, email, fax, self-help through the web) information and manage the customer’s request lifecycle, provides pre-integrated access to detailed configuration information. Provides information pertinent to analyzing, diagnosing, and resolving/fulfilling the customers issue or request. Page SOA Market and Products 2006: Current State, Future Directions ©2006 Enterprise Management Associates, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
  20. 20. Product Product Description How Long in Market? Service and Asset Manages Service Level Agreements 2004 Management Suite and Operational Level Agreements to ensure agreed services are fulfilled and that all engaged parties comply with their service requirements. Software Virtualization Solution A new approach to software 2005 management, allows companies to instantly activate, deactivate or reset applications and to avoid conflicts between applications, without altering the base Windows installation • Inventory: Automates the process of creating a CMDB, provides an accurate and thorough inventory of desktops, servers, notebooks, and handheld devices. • Software Delivery: Policy-based software distribution for applications and other software change packages. • HelpDesk: Provides a single console to capture caller (call, email, fax, self-help through the web) information and manage the customer’s request lifecycle. Provides pre-integrated access to detailed configuration information which allows the Service Desk technician to gather information pertinent to analyzing, diagnosing, and resolv- ing/fulfilling customer requests. Multiple options to execute activities to resolve or fulfill the request, including: remote control access through Carbon Copy Solution, Software distribution through Deployment Solution, analyze and complete self-healing activities through Site and Server Monitor, and verify application environment health through Application Metering Solution • Service and Asset Management Suite: Manages Service Level Agreements and Operational Level Agreements to ensure agreed services are fulfilled and that all engaged parties comply with their service requirements. This is achieved through the implementation of service thresholds for escalations and entitlement triggered and man- aged through Helpdesk Solution. Contract Management solution provides detailed metrics to help IT managers analyze the productivity and costs associated with service delivery. • Deployment Server: Q3, 2006 • Task Server: Q2, 2006 Distinguishing Features and Key Benefits Altiris Inventory Solution • Inventory capabilities include most systems, including Windows, UNIX, Linux, NetWare, Macintosh systems, and handheld and network devices • Improve application supportability and reduce support costs • Reduce the cost and complexity associated with application and OS rollouts and updates • Mobile-friendly features include reporting of delta changes, a cache and forward design, and over-the-wire data compression • Extend management capabilities as business grows, matures, and business needs change SOA Market and Products 2006: Current State, Future Directions Page ©2006 Enterprise Management Associates, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
  21. 21. Altiris Software Delivery Solution • Increased security with role-and-scope-based security model • Mobile-friendly features such as checkpoint restart and dynamic bandwidth throttling • Minimized impact to users through scheduled off-hour deliveries • Faster support resolution with baseline scans, Web Reports, and self-help “one offs” software needs • Simplified management tasks through wizards, a dashboard view, and so on • Extended management capabilities as business grows, matures, and business needs change Altiris Helpdesk • Complete incident management and resolution capabilities right out of the box • Role-based security offers fine-grained access control • Web Reports™ ensure quality of service and efficient IT operations • Ensure service availability with integrated server and site monitoring • Business rules allow for automated escalation, routing and notification of critical events • Smart tasks are customizable processes that are used to solve common problems in a consistent and repeatable way • Easy to install, implement, and maintain • Asset management integration allows the cost of providing services to be accurately tracked and distributed Altiris Service and Asset Management Suite • Simplify implementation of out-of-box ITIL asset and service management processes • Actively track IT asset location, configuration, deployed versions, relationships, and historical information • Actively track software and hardware usage for reallocation and contract negotiation • Support corporate Sarbanes-Oxley initiatives • Help proactively resolve incidents and problems to ensure asset and service availability • Allow employees to resolve their own issues with self-help • Enable better business decision-making processes with real-time diagnostic information • Manage remote computers using Microsoft WMI and Intel AMT • Solve immediate problems while building a roadmap for the future with snap-in, modular design • Authoring tools for defining additional custom tests and Vulnerability Profiles for security, compliance, gover- nance, and best practices • Dynamic creation, execution, and viewing of corresponding results for test suites Page SOA Market and Products 2006: Current State, Future Directions ©2006 Enterprise Management Associates, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
  22. 22. Altiris Software Virtualization Solution • Eliminate application conflicts • Instantly repair damaged applications • Significantly reduce testing time for application rollouts • On-demand application provisioning Target Verticals General Purpose Multi-Vendor and Standards Directions Integration with IT Management Products Pre existing Connectors: • Remedy Connector Pack • HP OpenView Connector Pack 6.0 • SMS Connector Pack • Peoplesoft Connector Pack • LDAP (Notes, E-directory) • Connector for HP Systems Insight Manager (Free) With Connector Solution: • Microsoft Access • Microsoft Excel • Microsoft SQL Server • Oracle • ODBC data source • OLE data source • Text (.CSV file) • XML Support for Industry Standards: • Current: Product built on web services support supplied by .NET 1.1 (and ASP.Net 1.1) • Future: Implement WSE 3.0 as a protocol layer in the Altiris 7 timeframe (since WSE 3.0 is dependent upon .NET 2.0). • Also supports LDAP (Connector) • Command Line Software Development Kit (SDK) for custom integrations SOA Market and Products 2006: Current State, Future Directions Page 6 ©2006 Enterprise Management Associates, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
  23. 23. EMA’s Perspective Since the introduction of its first desktop provisioning solutions in the late ‘90’s, Altiris has always managed to stay one step ahead of the industry. This is still the case, both with the recent introduction of SVS and the expected follow-up later in 2006 with SVS for servers. The products outlined in this paper show current direction and provide a glimpse of the short-term future. However, because of intelligent architecture and well-thought out product direction, Altiris has the capability to play an increasingly significant role as SOAs proliferate in the enterprise. Provisioning SOA components via the Altiris solutions is an attractive alternative because of Altiris’ centralized CMDB. Although in SOA implementations the components are loosely bound, meaning that they can migrate across IP addresses and still be accessible at the application layer, management products still have to clearly understand the relationship between SOA business services and underlying infrastructure. The federated CMDB will be the key to managing these composite structures, and an integrated CMDB such as Altiris provides will be necessary for service to technology map- pings to stay current. This will be especially true as Operating Systems and desktops are increasingly virtualized, making them even more opaque to manual management processes. Because of its open, extensible architecture and already rich integration, Altiris is also uniquely positioned to be inte- grated into enterprise SOAs as well as with products from other vendors. This feature enables the product modules to be easily called from within enterprise-specific, or vendor-specific, applications. Altiris also provides a feature-rich SDK to supplement this capability. With support for Windows-based platforms as well as many flavors of Unix including HP- UX, SUN Solaris, IBM AIX, Red Hat, SuSE and UnitedLinux, it’s hard to find a downside to this solution suite. Altiris is taking the right direction, making the right moves, and staying a few steps ahead of the competition – that combination is hard to beat. Page SOA Market and Products 2006: Current State, Future Directions ©2006 Enterprise Management Associates, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
  24. 24. AmberPoint Product Brief Highlights Context and Market Focus Vendor Name: AmberPoint AmberPoint is one of the best known pure Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) vendors in the marketplace today. The com- Contact Name: AmberPoint Sales pany continues to grow by approximately 20 to 25 employees per Telephone Number: 510-663-6300 year, executing incrementally on a very clear-cut product vision. AmberPoint is very focused on its stated direction, which is SOA Email Address: info@amberpoint.com runtime management, not on development or execution, at least URL: www.amberpoint.com for the present. The company specializes in runtime governance and counts on partners to deliver functionality, such as orchestra- Date Founded: 2002 tion and repositories, outside the AmberPoint product realm. Number of Employees: 100+ AmberPoint products have automatic visibility to enterprise Availability: All products discussed are transactions via XML message sniffing and fingerprinting. They available now can watch dialogues as they traverse the SOA transaction space, even if the SOA registry is unavailable. Using the information collected, the products address two specific dimensions: • The visibility dimension, concerned with what is going on in the SOA enterprise. • The control dimension, which deals with how to prevent adverse events or otherwise act on information gath- ered during the execution process. AmberPoint’s focused approach is applied to product architecture as well. The most recent release reflects a product that has been totally rewritten using Service Oriented Architecture concepts. This has resulted in several key capabilities: • High level of extensibility: solution set additions can be implemented as simple component add-ons to the overall product suite • One interface: A single interface is used both to manage the customer’s SOA implementation and the AmberPoint system itself. This means that a single web-based console providing customized views for each department within an organization can be used across the enterprise for “all things AmberPoint.” • Policy controlled solution set: Policies are used not only to control the behavior of the SOA system, but also to control the behavior of the AmberPoint management system itself. This is a major differentiator from competi- tive products and one that yields a more consistent and intrinsically productive architecture. While many competitive products rely on brokers for command and control, AmberPoint’s position is that a broker architecture creates a single point of failure. Instead, their approach is to implement a federated model with autonomous agents capable of running independently. If the management system is unavailable, the agent can either store collected data in memory or write it locally as a log or file. It can also write to a local or remote database. AmberPoint has developed a solid architecture that is well-positioned to respond flexibly and with agility to the continu- ally evolving SOA space. If the past is any indication of the future, AmberPoint’s product focus and roadmap bode well for continued success. SOA Market and Products 2006: Current State, Future Directions Page ©2006 Enterprise Management Associates, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

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