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    • 21 APPENDIX G: New course proposals (with accompanying library statements) Includes: 1. ITEC 6310 3.00 Research Methods in Information Technology 2. ITEC 4010/5210 3.00 Systems Analysis and Design (proposal for creation of a new integrated course using an existing undergraduate course; letter approving integration included) 3. ITEC 4305/5205 3.00 Web Mining (proposal for creation of a new integrated course using an existing undergraduate course; letter approving integration included) 4. ITEC 6110 3.00 Workflow Systems and Service Oriented Architecture 5. ITEC 6120 3.00 Systems Requirements Management 6. ITEC 6130 3.00 Autonomic Service Oriented Computing 7. ITEC 6210 3.00 Advanced Information Retrieval Systems 8. ITEC 6220 3.00 Advanced Information Management 9. ITEC 6230 3.00 Health Information Systems 10. ITEC 6320 3.00 Information Technology and Organizational Strategy 11. ITEC 6330 3.00 Designing and Building e-Business Applications 12. ITEC 6970 3.00 Advanced Topics in Information Technology 13. ITEC 6002 3.00 Directed Readings
    • 22 New Course Proposal 1. Course Number and Title: ITEC 6310 3.00 – Research Methods in Information Technology 2. Effective Date and Term: FW 2009/10 3. Calendar Course Description This course provides a foundation in scientific inquiry applied to both practical and theoretical IT-related problems. Students formulate research questions, select appropriate research design to collect and analyze data, prepare reports, and evaluate research proposals and projects. Students must complete this course during their first year in the program. Prerequisite: None 4. Expanded Course Description This required course provides a foundation in scientific inquiry applied to both practical and theoretical IT-related problems. Students learn to formulate research questions, select appropriate research design to collect and analyze data, and to prepare reports. Students also learn to evaluate research proposals and projects. Students must complete this course during their first year in the program. The course focuses on the major research approaches, on what each method does and does not accomplish, on the conditions under which it is needed, and on whether or not it is properly used. Weekly topics covered include: Part 1: Introduction to research in IT 1. Researching IT-related problems with scientific thinking 2. The research process 3. The research proposal Part 2: The research design 4. Design strategies and sampling 5. Measurement and scaling Part 3: The sources and collection of data 6. Survey methods 7. Experimentation 8. Other: Case studies and secondary data Part 4: Analysis and presentation of data 9. Data preparation and hypothesis testing 10. Overview of analytical techniques and presentation of results 11. Project presentations 5. Faculty Resources Faculty most likely to teach this course include Y. Benslimane, R. Campeanu, L. Cysneiros, and Z. Yang
    • 23 The course will be offered annually. 6. Evaluation The breakdown of the marks will be as follows: Assignment 10% Research Proposal 40% Final Exam 40% Project presentation 10% 7. Bibliography Packet that includes: 1. Bordens K.S and Abbott B.B. Research Design and Methods: A Process Approach, 6th edition. McGraw-Hill, 2004. 2. Collection of relevant articles from leading IT-related journals. Other references: Leedy P.D, Ormord J.E. and Ormord J.E. Practical Research: Planning and Design,8th edition. Prentice Hall, 2004. Jackson S.L. Research Methods and Statistics, 2nd edition. Wadsworth Publishing, 2005. Creswell J.W. and Plano Clark V.L. Designing and Conducting Mixed Methods Research, 1st edition. Sage Publications, 2006. 8. Resources (library/physical/other) See library statement 9. Integrated Courses N/A 10. Crosslisted Courses N/A 11. Rationale This course is required for all students in the proposed Master of Arts in Information Systems and Technology (MAIST). Students must complete this course during their first year in the program. The course allows students to develop the research and writing skills they need to plan and execute their research projects. It also fosters the development of skills in critical analysis necessary to successfully complete the program.
    • 24 To: Radu Campeanu, ITEC Program Jimmy Huang, ITEC Program Sarah Hildebrandt, Coordinator, Academic Planning, Atkinson From: John Dupuis, ITEC Librarian Re: ITEC 6310 – Research Methods in Information Technology Date: November 12, 2007 I have reviewed the course proposal and attached bibliography for ITEC 6310 – Research Methods in Information Technology and can state that the York University Libraries have the required resources to support this graduate level course. Please be aware that the library offers the following services to help students with research assignments: • A librarian can introduce students to research techniques, including how to evaluate Internet sources for use in scholarly research. • Individual students can set up consultations with a subject expert to kickstart his or her research project. • Links to online journal and conference articles can be added to the course’s Library Reserves listing The following electronic resources licensed by the library may be of help to the students in this course: • ABI/Inform and Business Source Premier are business research databases which have articles on software engineering / Information Technology topics from a business perspective. • Computer Database is a full-text database of over 200 scholarly and trade publications in the computing field – it is especially useful for product or technology evaluation. • MathSciNet is the main article search engine for mathematics. • INSPEC is the main article search engine for Computer Science. • Gartner Group Intraweb is the Gartner Group’s suite of technology and product evaluation research reports. It is especially good at trend analysis. • IEEE Digital Library with over 160 journals, 5000 conferences and 1400 standards. • ACM Digital Library with all ACM journals, magazines and proceedings. It is particularly good as a source of case studies. • Safari is a technology ebook product which contains 150 titles on various topics including web development, Java, C/C++, Windows, Office, Linux. If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact me. New Course Proposal
    • 25 1. Course Number and Title: ITEC 4010/5210 3.00 Systems Analysis and Design 2. Effective Date and Term: FW 2009/10 3. Calendar Course Description The course discusses concepts, theories, and techniques for analysis, design and implementation of software systems. The focus is on distributed applications, with special emphasis on requirements gathering, modeling techniques and design trade-off analysis. Prerequisite: ITEC 3010 or equivalent 4. Expanded Course Description This course seeks to discuss the key concepts for analysis, design and implementation of complex distributed applications. After the completion of the course, the students will: • Acquire basic and advanced concepts of systems analysis and design; • Become familiar with common visual modeling techniques; • Become familiar with design and implementation tradeoffs; • Become familiar with Computer Aided Software Engineering (CASE) tools for analysis, design and construction of complex software systems; • Be able to apply analysis, design and construction techniques to a real life system; • Learn to work within the structure of a software project team. This course is self-contained, and gives the essential background for anyone planning to learn about and contribute to the principles and designing software applications The following main modules and topics will be covered: • Introduction • Process Model and Software Development Life Cycle • Software Models and Unified Modeling Languages 2.0 • Requirements, Analysis and Modeling • Design Basics and Software Architectures • Reuse and Design Patterns • Mapping the Design to Code • Mapping the Design to databases • Software Testing and Reliability • Software Performance • Software Security • Project Management and Software Economics • Paper or Project
    • 26 5. Faculty Resources Faculty most likely to teach this course include: Marin Litoiu, Luiz Cysneiros The course will be offered annually. 6. Evaluation Evaluation will be based on assignments and tests. The breakdown of the marks will be as follows: Undergraduate (ITEC 4010) • Team project (40%) • Tests and assignments (15%). • Class discussions (5%) • Final exam (40%) Graduate (ITEC 5210) • Team project (50%) • Paper reviews (10%) • Tests and assignments (15%). • Class discussions (5%) • Final exam (20%) Notes • The tests and assignments for 4010 and 5210 will have different levels of difficulty • Project topics and difficulty will be differentiated according to the course level, with graduate students working on research oriented topics. • At the graduate level, the projects will weigh more • Graduate students will also be familiarized with research methods by reading and providing reports of research papers assigned by instructor 7. Bibliography Text book: Bernd Bruegge, Allen H. Dutoit, Object-Oriented Software Engineering – Using UML, Patterns and Java, 2nd edition, Prentice Hall, 2004 Additional books: • Grady Booch, James Rumbaugh, Ivar Jacobson. The unified modeling language user guide, Addison-Wesley, 2005 • Dan Pilone, UML2.0 in a Nutshell, A desktop reference guide, O’Reilly, 2005 • Connie Smith, Lloyd Williams, Performance solutions : a practical guide to creating responsive, scalable software, Addison-Wesley, 2001 • Erich Gamma ... [et al.], Design patterns: elements of reusable object-oriented software, Addison-Wesley, 1994. • M. Shaw and D. Garlan. Software Architecture: Perspectives on a Emerging Discipline. Prentice Hall, Englewood Cliffs, NJ, 1996
    • 27 8. Resources (library/physical/other) See library statement 9. Integrated Courses Integrated with ITEC 4010 (undergraduate level course). Lectures and tutorials are common to both courses. Students will have to work on projects that have different levels of difficulty and different emphases. Students in 5210 will complete projects focusing on research topics such as quality of services (performance, security) while students in 4010 will focus on functional requirements. In addition, students in 5210 will be familiarized with research topics and methods by reading research papers and reporting on them. 10. Crosslisted Courses N/A 11. Rationale This is an existing course at the undergraduate level and is being brought forward now as an integrated undergraduate/graduate level course. ITEC 4010/5210 is a core course for the existing undergraduate program in ITEC; it is one of the courses in the proposed MAIST core, from which students will choose a specified number of credits, depending on degree option. CSE courses deal with software engineering (building complex, large-scale software) while ITEC4010/5210 explores the implementation of IT in organizations. For example, CSE 6411 is highly mathematical, while the proposed ITEC course deals with the use of technology to solve organizational issues. CSE6411 focuses on writing complex code, while the ITEC course uses visual tools such as Rational Architect to produce the applications. ITEC 5210 is appropriate for students interested in analysing and designing enterprise software systems. ITEC 5210 is a project oriented course. April 22, 2008
    • 28 I approve the integration of ITEC 4010/5210 3.00 Systems Analysis and Design. The proposal outlines content and evaluation methods that have been differentiated for undergraduate and graduate students. The differentiation is pedagogically sound and will meet student needs. ITEC 4010 is an existing course that is generally offered every term. The integration of ITEC 4010/5210 will allow for more course selection for students at the graduate level, without drawing on additional resources. The integrated ITEC 4010/5210 will benefit undergraduate students by allowing them early contact with graduate faculty. Radu Campeanu Associate Professor Director, School of Information Technology
    • 29 New Course Proposal 1. Course Number and Title: ITEC 4305/5205 3.00 – Web Mining 2. Effective Date and Term: FW 2009/10 3. Calendar Course Description This course explores how Web mining technology can be applied to solve problems in real-world applications, introducing advanced techniques from Web mining, information retrieval and their applications in e-commerce and Web information systems. Prerequisite: ITEC 4020 or equivalent. 4. Expanded Course Description The rapid growth of the World Wide Web in the last decade makes it the largest publicly accessible data source in the world. Its unique characteristics make mining useful information from the Web a fascinating and challenging task. Web mining aims to discover useful information or knowledge from the Web hyperlink structure, page content and usage log. Based on the primary kind of data used in the mining process, Web mining tasks are categorized into three main types: Web structure mining, Web content mining and Web usage mining. In particular, Web mining makes it possible to search for patterns in data through content mining, structure mining, and usage mining. Content mining is used to examine data collected by search engines and Web spiders. Structure mining is used to examine data related to the structure of a particular Web site and usage mining is used to examine data related to a particular user's browser as well as data gathered by forms the user may have submitted during Web sessions. The objectives of this course are to present these tasks, and their essential methods and techniques. This course is offered for advanced undergraduate students, graduate students, researchers and development professionals in the IT field. While the course emphasizes research, especially for graduate students, this course is taught from a practical point of view, because most Web mining tasks have immediate real-world applications. For example, Web mining can be used to understand customer behavior, evaluate the effectiveness of a particular Web site, or help quantify the success of a marketing campaign. The course is lecture-based. For graduate students, evaluation is weighted towards research. Undergraduate students are evaluated using a combination of assignments, an exam, and a project. Assignments involve implementing and experimenting with an
    • 30 algorithm on real text data. The final course project gives students hands-on experience in developing novel Web information management tools. Group work is encouraged for the final course project. This course will cover the following issues and topics. 1. Introduction and Overview • Overview of the Web mining process. What is Web mining? • What is the difference between Web mining and data mining etc.? • Data preparation for Web mining • Information retrieval, machine learning and data mining techniques • Supervised learning • Unsupervised learning • Partially supervised learning • Probabilistic weighting and ranking • Market basket analysis • Evaluation and interpretation 2. Web Usage Mining Process and Techniques • Data collection and Web log data • Data preparation for usage mining • Mining navigational patterns • Integrating e-commerce data • Leveraging site content and structure • User tracking and profiling • E-Metrics: measuring success in e-commerce • Privacy issues 3. Web Content Mining • Basic concepts in information retrieval and extraction • Information retrieval models and techniques • Web search • Text mining from semi-structured web documents 4. Web Structure Mining • Web authorities • Web hubs • Mining structural information on the web • Web crawling 5. Information Retrieval and Web Search • Information retrieval models • Relevance feedback • Text and Web page pre-processing
    • 31 • Inverted index and its compression • Web search and opinion search • Web crawling and information integration • Web spamming • Web aspect search and mining 6. Web Opinion Mining • Sentiment classification • Feature-based opinion mining and summarization • Comparative sentence and relation mining • Case studies • Opinion spamming 7. Web Mining Applications and Other Topics • Web personalization and recommender systems • Social network analysis • Social sciences and bibliometry • PageRank and Hyperlink-induced topic search (HITS) • Shortcomings of the coarse-grained graph model • Enhanced models and techniques • Evaluation of topic distillation • Measuring and modeling the Web • Resource discovery • Collecting important pages preferentially • Similarity search using link topology • Topical locality and focused crawling • Discovering communities • Review of tools, applications, and systems • Web blogs mining • Online medical data analysis 5. Faculty Resources Faculty members who are most likely to teach this course are: Jimmy Huang, Marin Litoiu and Xiaohui Yu The course will be offered annually. 6. Evaluation Evaluation will be based on research papers, assignments and presentations, a final examination and a final course project. The breakdown of the marks will be as follows: Graduate Students Research paper(s) (one long or two shorter) 20% Presentations and readings 10%
    • 32 Final exam 20% Final course project 50% Undergraduate Students Assignment 1 25% Assignment 2 25% Final exam 30% Final course project 20% 7. Bibliography [1] Web Data Mining: Exploring Hyperlinks, Contents, and Usage Data, by Bing Liu, Springer Publishers, 2007. [2] Foundations of Web Technology, by R. Sarukkai, Kluwer Academic Publishers, 2003. [3] Mining the Web: Discovering Knowledge from Hypertext Data, by Soumen Chakrabarti, Morgan Kaufmann Publishers. 2002. [4] Data Mining -- Concepts and Techniques, by Jiawei Han and Kamber, Morgan Kaufmann Publishers. 2001 [5] Mining the World Wide Web: An Information Search Approach, by G. Chang, M.J. Healey et al. Kluwer Academic Publishers, 2003. [6] Various papers or online resources. 8. Resources (library/physical/other) See library statement 9. Integrated Courses Undergraduate and graduate student methods of evaluation are differentiated as follows: 1. Graduate student evaluation emphasizes research. Each graduate student writes one long research paper or two short research papers as his/her course assignment(s). Undergraduates will not write research papers. 2. Graduate students complete a course project that addresses challenging, real-world problems, using large, real-world data sets such as the blog data sets for Web opinion search and mining from the Text REtrieval Conference (TREC). Undergraduate students complete a smaller course project using small data sets. 3. Graduate student evaluation includes presentations and readings, whereas this component is not included in the undergraduate marking scheme; instead, for undergraduates, more emphasis is placed on the final exam. 10. Crosslisted Courses
    • 33 N/A 11. Rationale This is an existing course at the undergraduate level and is being brought forward now as an integrated undergraduate/graduate level course. ITEC 4305/5205 is one of the courses in the MAIST core, from which students will choose a specified number of credits, depending on degree option. This course teaches students advanced Web mining techniques and prepares them for the real-world tasks of data analysis and discovering knowledge from the Web. ITEC 4305/5205 is complemented at the undergraduate level by CSE 4412 Data Mining and at the graduate level by CSE 6412 Data Mining. CSE 6412 is listed in the MAIST proposal as one of the courses students may take as part of the 6 out-of-department credits they are permitted to count towards their degree. Course content is sufficiently different that students may take either ITEC 5205 and/or CSE 6412. Data mining is the process used to identify patterns or knowledge from data sources. Thus CSE 6412 covers association rule mining, sequential pattern mining, mining classification models, clustering analysis, and devotes a small amount of time to Web mining, if time allows. By contrast, ITEC 4305/5205 touches on the first four topics briefly in the overview/introduction, and then spends the rest of the course on Web mining specifically. Rather than being simply an application of data mining techniques, Web mining has developed many of its own methods, ideas, models and algorithms, because the richness and diversity of Web data give it unique characteristics and pose special challenges. In addition, data collection constitutes a substantial component of the Web mining process, which is not the case in data mining. Web mining has become a popular research area in information technology due to its direct applications in e-commerce, information retrieval/filtering, and Web information systems, and (electronic customer relationship management) e-CRM. Due to the distinctive and topical nature of the subject matter, York students will benefit from having access to courses in both Web mining and data mining.
    • 34 April 22, 2008 I approve the integration of ITEC 4305/5205 3.00 Web Mining. The proposal outlines content and evaluation methods that have been differentiated for undergraduate and graduate students. The differentiation is pedagogically sound and will meet student needs. ITEC 4305 is an existing course that is generally offered every year. The integration of ITEC 4305/5205 will allow for more course selection for students at the graduate level, without drawing on additional resources. The integrated ITEC 4305/5205 will benefit undergraduate students by allowing them early contact with graduate faculty. Radu Campeanu Associate Professor Director, School of Information Technology
    • 35 New Course Proposal 1. Course Number and Title: ITEC 6110 3.00 – Workflow Systems and Service Oriented Architecture 2. Effective Date and Term: 2009/10 3. Calendar Course Description This course introduces students to recent advances in workflow systems. It introduces the capabilities of workflow technology and focuses on (1) concepts underlying workflow systems and their applications and (2) the techniques applied to their development and their architecture. Prerequisite: ITEC 4030 or equivalent 5. Expanded Course Description Workflow systems provide the automation of business processes and coordinate the activities of people and applications within and between organizations. They are also key elements of the enterprise integration architecture. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to understand the fundamentals of workflow systems and apply concepts such as case, task, work item, activity, role, organizational unit and resource. Students should also understand and work with the functions and architecture of workflow systems, understand how workflow systems improve an organization’s operations, and analyze a workflow process. Students will be able to construct a workflow model based on an informal description and apply the activities involved in the life cycle phases of system development to support workflow management. Finally, students will learn to define the architecture and system structure required to provide scalability, availability and reliability in various workflow systems. Weekly topics covered include process modeling methods, business rules management, business process redesign, design of workflow management systems, organizational impact of process automation, monitoring and controlling of business processes, process modeling standards, web services choreography and service oriented architecture. 5. Faculty Resources Faculty most likely to teach this course include Y. Benslimane, L. Cysneiros, Z. Yang, R. Campeanu and J. Huang. The course will be offered annually.
    • 36 6. Evaluation The breakdown of the marks will be as follows: Assignment 10% Research Proposal 40% Final Exam 40% Project presentation 10% 7. Bibliography Packet that includes: 1) Wil van der Aalst and Kees Max van Hee. "Workflow Management: Models, Methods and Systems", The MIT Press, USA, 2004 2) Collection of relevant articles from leading IT-related journals. 8. Resources (library/physical/other) See library statement 9. Integrated Courses N/A 10. Crosslisted Courses N/A 11. Rationale This course is one of the courses in the MAIST core, from which students will choose a specified number of credits, depending on degree option. The mission-critical nature of workflow systems mandates that students are (1) aware of the concepts and techniques involved and (2) familiar with the research conducted in this area. This course helps students achieve these objectives. Moreover, students will learn about what has been researched in the area of workflow systems, what has not been researched and will work on a proposal that can bridge that gap.
    • 37 To: Radu Campeanu, ITEC Program Jimmy Huang, ITEC Program Sarah Hildebrandt, Coordinator, Academic Planning, Atkinson From: John Dupuis, ITEC Librarian Re: ITEC 6110 – Workflow Systems and Service Oriented Architecture Date: November 12, 2007 I have reviewed the course proposal and attached bibliography for ITEC 6110 – Workflow Systems and Service Oriented Architecture and can state that the York University Libraries have the required resources to support this graduate level course. Please be aware that the library offers the following services to help students with research assignments: • A librarian can introduce students to research techniques, including how to evaluate Internet sources for use in scholarly research. • Individual students can set up consultations with a subject expert to kickstart his or her research project. • Links to online journal and conference articles can be added to the course’s Library Reserves listing The following electronic resources licensed by the library may be of help to the students in this course: • ABI/Inform and Business Source Premier are business research databases which have articles on software engineering / Information Technology topics from a business perspective. • Computer Database is a full-text database of over 200 scholarly and trade publications in the computing field – it is especially useful for product or technology evaluation. • Factiva and Canadian Newsstand are full text newspaper sources • Gartner Group Intraweb is the Gartner Group’s suite of technology and product evaluation research reports. It is especially good at trend analysis. • INSPEC is the main article search engine for Computer Science. • IEEE Digital Library with over 160 journals, 5000 conferences and 1400 standards. • ACM Digital Library with all ACM journals, magazines and proceedings. It is particularly good as a source of case studies. • Safari is a technology ebook product which contains 150 titles on various topics including web development, Java, C/C++, Windows, Office, Linux. If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact me.
    • 38 New Course Proposal 1. Course Number and Title: ITEC 6120 3.00 – Systems Requirements Management 2. Effective Date and Term: 2009/10 3. Calendar Course Description This course covers advanced and emerging methods and techniques used to elicit, model, analyze, and manage software requirements. Students will also acquire skills and knowledge necessary for conducting research in the field.    4. Expanded Course Description This course covers advanced and emerging methods and techniques used to elicit, model, analyze, and manage software requirements. The multi-disciplinary nature of the field will be emphasized. By the end of the course, students will have an understanding of current issues, as well as state of the art techniques and methods, in systems requirements management, and the skills and knowledge necessary to conduct research in the field. Students will acquire experience in a variety of complex techniques for requirements elicitation. They will be challenged to identify whether existing techniques can be improved and, through readings in current research literature, to identify the most suitable techniques for particular circumstances. They will also be introduced to modeling languages and tools that facilitate the expression and understanding of requirements, as well as communication amongst developers. Students will learn to use agent oriented models, as well as to identify their strengths and weaknesses. The course will examine techniques for requirements verification and validation. Requirements management is taught through a perspective of a constant evolving environment. Detailed outline of topics to be covered: 1. Introduction to Requirements Engineering 1.1 What are Requirements? 1.2 Why Requirements Engineering? 1.3 What is a system? 2. Elicitation techniques 2.1 Elicitation Target 2.2 Elicitation Techniques 2.3 The feasibility Study 2.4 Risk Analysis 3. Modeling and Analysis 3.1 Basics of Modeling 3.2 Enterprises
    • 39 3.3. Information Structures 3.4 Behavior 3.5 Non-Functional Requirements 3.6 Agent-Oriented Systems 4. Evaluating and Agreeing on System Requirements 4.1 Validation 4.2 Documenting Requirements 4.3 Prototyping and Walkthrough 4.4 Reviews and Inspections 4.5 Negotiating and Prioritizing 5. Requirements Evolution 5.1 Software Evolution 5.2 Traceability and Rationale 5.3 Managing Inconsistency 6. Requirements in the Health Care Domain 5. Faculty Resources Faculty most likely to teach this course include: Luiz Marcio Cysneiros and Marin Litoiu This course will be offered annually. 6. Evaluation 1st Assignment 10% 2nd Assignment 20% 1 Research Paper or Final Exam 70% 7. Bibliography Packet including: 1. G. Kotonya and I. Sommerville, Requirements Engineering: Processes and Techniques, Wiley, 1998 2. I. Sommerville and P. Sawyer, Requirements Engineering: A Good Practice Guide, Wiley, 1997 3. J. Goguen and M. Jirotka, “Requirements Engineering: Social and Technical Issues,” Academic Press Professional, 1994 Other references: Cysneiros, L.M. and Yu, E. “Requirements Engineering for Large-Scale Multi-Agent Systems” In: A. Garcia, C. Lucena, A. Omicini, F. Zambonelli, J. Castro (Eds). "Software Engineering for Large-Scale Multi-Agent Systems". Springer-Verlag, LNCS 2603, April
    • 40 2003, pp:39-56 ISBN 3-540-00605-2 Yu, E. and Cysneiros, L.M. “Designing for Privacy in a Multi-Agent World” In: R. Falcone, S. Barber, L. Korba and M. Singh (Eds) "Trust, Reputation and Security: Theories and Practice": Springer-Verlag, LNAI 2631, May 2003, pp: 209 - 223.ISBN: 3-540-00988-4 Cysneiros,L.M “Requirements Engineering in Health Care Domain” in Proc. of the 10th IEEE International Requirements Engineering Conference, Essen, Sept. 2002 pp:350-356 .ISBN:0-7695-1465-0, ISSN:1090-705X. E. Yu, “Towards Modelling and Reasoning Support for Early-Phase Requirements Engineering,” presented at Proceedings of the 3rd IEEE International Symposium on Requirements Engineering (RE'97), Annapolis, USA, 1997. Chung, L., Nixon, B., Yu, E. and Mylopoulos, J., Non-Functional Requirements in Software Engineering, Kluwer, 2000. 8. Resources (library/physical/other) The computer resources in the new ITEC lab in the TEL building will be sufficient for the presentation of this course material. See library statement. 9. Integrated Courses N/A 10. Crosslisted Courses N/A 11. Rationale This course is one of the courses in the MAIST core, from which students will choose a specified number of credits, depending on degree option. A well-defined set of requirements is a key for any successful software development. However, requirements engineering is a complex activity that includes not only using adequate techniques and methods but also the search for improving current business processes. All software is introduced in a specific context within an organization. An IT professional must know how to understand, model, communicate and analyze the current business process, its weaknesses and strengths in order to be able to come up with new alternatives to the current process that might improve it. This course provides students with techniques and methods to perform this task. Unlike the undergraduate ITEC 4040, which introduces students to the key elements of requirements engineering, the graduate ITEC 6120 emphasizes research, explores more complex examples of requirements engineering techniques, and expects students not only
    • 41 to use but also to evaluate the suitability of those techniques for specific situations. Students from the undergraduate ITEC program who have taken ITEC 4040 will benefit from the challenging and research intensive approach to requirements engineering offered in ITEC 6120. Graduate students without ITEC 4040 or equivalent undergraduate experience will be able, because of their IT backgrounds, to master basic concepts quickly and acquire the advanced skills and knowledge cultivated in ITEC 6120. Three other courses at York (CSE 4312, CSE 6411 and CSE 6431) adopt different approaches to requirements engineering, reflecting the disciplinary differences between IT and computer science and engineering as well as the different subtopics available for study within the general field of requirements engineering. CSE 4312 and CSE 6411 emphasize mathematical models for requirements specification, drawing on mathematical background that is one of the preconditions for acceptance to graduate programs in computer science and engineering, but not for programs in IT like MAIST. While ITEC 6120 spends many weeks on elicitation (the aspect of requirements engineering that demands close communication between users and developers), CSE 4312 focuses only briefly on this subject. CSE 6431 is a highly specialized course, focusing on the clustering and pattern detection techniques that allow for the re-engineering of legacy software, rather than on the development of requirements engineering techniques that may be used in information systems development.
    • 42 To: Radu Campeanu, ITEC Program Jimmy Huang, ITEC Program Sarah Hildebrandt, Coordinator, Academic Planning, Atkinson From: John Dupuis, ITEC Librarian Re: ITEC 6120 – System Requirements Management Date: November 12, 2007 I have reviewed the course proposal and attached bibliography for ITEC 6120 – System Requirements Management and can state that the York University Libraries have the required resources to support this undergraduate level course. Please be aware that the library offers the following services to help students with research assignments: • A librarian can introduce students to research techniques, including how to evaluate Internet sources for use in scholarly research. • Individual students can set up consultations with a subject expert to kickstart his or her research project. • Links to online journal and conference articles can be added to the course’s Library Reserves listing The following electronic resources licensed by the library may be of help to the students in this course: • ABI/Inform and Business Source Premier are business research databases which have articles on software engineering / Information Technology topics from a business perspective. • Computer Database is a full-text database of over 200 scholarly and trade publications in the computing field – it is especially useful for product or technology evaluation. • Factiva and Canadian Newsstand are full text newspaper sources • Gartner Group Intraweb is the Gartner Group’s suite of technology and product evaluation research reports. It is especially good at trend analysis. • INSPEC is the main article search engine for Computer Science. • IEEE Digital Library with over 160 journals, 5000 conferences and 1400 standards. • ACM Digital Library with all ACM journals, magazines and proceedings. It is particularly good as a source of case studies. • Safari is a technology ebook product which contains 150 titles on various topics including web development, Java, C/C++, Windows, Office, Linux and Unix. If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact me.
    • 43 New Course Proposal 1. Course Number and Title: ITEC 6130 3.00 Autonomic Service Oriented Computing 2. Effective Date and Term: FW 2009/10 3. Calendar Course Description Discusses concepts, theories, and techniques for services and for autonomic computing. Examines architectures for Web applications based on the classic publish, find, and bind triangle. Key topics include semantics, transactions, Web service composition and the concepts of self-configuring, self-optimizing and self-healing. Prerequisite: ITEC 4020 or equivalent 4. Expanded Course Description This course addresses the concepts and techniques of service-oriented computing. It introduces the basics of service oriented computing and has students apply them in project work. The main emphasis of this course is on the concepts that relate to self- configuring, self-healing and self-optimizing. Service-oriented computing is emerging as an alternative to classical programming models. A service is a repeatable task within a business process and is autonomous, heterogeneous and highly dynamic. Services in general are not invoked but are engaged, meaning that the interactions one has with them are quite unlike method invocations and are better modeled as parts of extended conversations. Protocols, in this sense, replace programming interfaces as an abstraction for programming. Similarly, selecting the right service is more than simply looking up a directory with a method signature, and involves considerations of quality of services and autonomic capabilities. Autonomic computing, on the other hand, focuses on reducing the development and operational cost of software systems. More specifically, it enhances the software components and system with self- management properties such as self-optimization, self- reconfiguration and self-healing. This course seeks to discuss the key concepts for service-oriented computing and for autonomic systems. Its intent is to formulate the foundational concepts of services and autonomic computing and how they relate to each other, to evaluate existing approaches, to present existing techniques from other areas that can be adopted for services, and to introduce emerging techniques for addressing challenges that are unique to services. This course is self-contained, and gives the essential background for anyone planning to learn about and contribute to the principles and applications of services and autonomic computing.
    • 44 The following main topics will be covered: Introduction -Brief history of information technology -Distributed computing in the large -Motivations for composition Services Architectures and Standards -Basic concepts -Technology -Enterprise architectures Autonomic Computing -Basic concepts -Technology Problems and challenges -Evaluation of current architectures and standards -Prelude to techniques -Key challenges: configuration, composition, self-healing and self optimization Modeling and representation -Development time models -Deployment and operational time models -Ontologies and knowledge sharing -Relevant standards: Resource Description Framework (RDF), RDF Schema, and Web Ontology Language (OWL) Applications -Process specification -Relevant standards: Business Process Execution Language for Web Services (BPEL4WS), Web Services Choreography Interface(WSCI), Web Service Coordination(WS-C), Web Service Distributed Management (WSDM) Engineering -Engineering composed autonomic services -Validation 5. Faculty Resources Faculty most likely to teach this course include: Marin Litoiu, Jimmy Huang. The course will be offered annually. 6. Evaluation Evaluation will be based on assignments and tests. The breakdown of the marks will be as follows: Assignments/ In-class Exams (4) 30% Case Analysis (2) 30% Research Project (Written Report, Presentation) 40%
    • 45 7. Bibliography Singh M., Huhns M., Service-Oriented Computing, John Wiley & Sons, 2005, ISBN 0-470-09148-7 Parashar M., Hariri S., Autonomic Computing, Concepts, Infrastructure and Applications, CRC Press, 2007, ISBN-10: 1-4200-0935-4 8. Resources (library/physical/other) See library statement 9. Integrated Courses N/A 10. Crosslisted Courses N/A 11. Rationale This course is one of the courses in the MAIST core, from which students will choose a specified number of credits, depending on degree option. It provides students with an understanding of a service based computational model, with current technological advancements that support services and methods to implement, deploy and manage services. This course also builds bridges between technology and business, one of the key activities modeled by MAIST faculty and in MAIST courses, by introducing languages and technologies that connect the two.
    • 46 To: Radu Campeanu, ITEC Program Jimmy Huang, ITEC Program Sarah Hildebrandt, Coordinator, Academic Planning, Atkinson From: John Dupuis, ITEC Librarian Re: ITEC 6130 – Autonomic Service Oriented Computing Date: November 12, 2007 I have reviewed the course proposal and attached bibliography for ITEC 6130 – Autonomic Service Oriented Computing and can state that the York University Libraries have the required resources to support this graduate level course. Please be aware that the library offers the following services to help students with research assignments: • A librarian can introduce students to research techniques, including how to evaluate Internet sources for use in scholarly research. • Individual students can set up consultations with a subject expert to kickstart his or her research project. • Links to online journal and conference articles can be added to the course’s Library Reserves listing The following electronic resources licensed by the library may be of help to the students in this course: • ABI/Inform and Business Source Premier are business research databases which have articles on software engineering / Information Technology topics from a business perspective. • Computer Database is a full-text database of over 200 scholarly and trade publications in the computing field – it is especially useful for product or technology evaluation. • Factiva and Canadian Newsstand are full text newspaper sources. • MathSciNet is the main article search engine for mathematics. • INSPEC is the main article search engine in computer science. • Gartner Group Intraweb is the Gartner Group’s suite of technology and product evaluation research reports. It is especially good at trend analysis. • IEEE Digital Library with over 160 journals, 5000 conferences and 1400 standards. • ACM Digital Library with all ACM journals, magazines and proceedings. It is particularly good as a source of case studies. • Safari is a technology ebook product which contains 150 titles on various topics including web development, Java, C/C++, Windows, Office, Linux. If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact me.
    • 47 New Course Proposal 1. Course Number and Title: ITEC 6210 3.00 - Advanced Information Retrieval Systems 2. Effective Date and Term: FW 2009/10 3. Calendar Course Description Introduces advanced techniques and core technologies used in information retrieval and studies the theory, design, and implementation of text-based information retrieval systems. Focuses on effectively interpreting imprecise queries and providing a high quality response to them from large text-based collections. Prerequisite: ITEC 4020 or equivalent. 4. Expanded Course Description Unlike structured information, which is typically managed with a relational database, textual information is unstructured and poses special challenges due to the difficulty in precisely understanding natural language and users' information needs. In this course, we introduce a variety of techniques for organizing, searching and mining large text information. The course emphasizes basic and advanced principles and practically useful algorithms. The objectives of this course for our graduate students are: • to understand the dimensions of the information retrieval problem; • to understand the functions of an information retrieval system; • to analyze the components of an information retrieval system; • to consider the factors which optimize the information retrieval process; • to examine current research topics in information retrieval; • to obtain solid project experience with developing real-world applications and extending existing tools; • to open the door to the increasing number of job positions in search technology related companies The IR core components of the course include statistical characteristics of text, representation of information needs and documents, several important retrieval models (Boolean, vector space, probabilistic and language modeling), clustering algorithms, automatic text categorization, and experimental evaluation. The software architecture components include design and implementation of high performance text retrieval systems; the Okapi and Lemur search engines are used as working examples. The course is lecture-based. Grading is based on assignments and presentations, a final examination and a final course project. Assignments generally involve implementing and experimenting with an algorithm with real text data. The final course project gives students hands-on experience developing novel text information management tools.
    • 48 Group work is encouraged for the final course project. The course will cover the following issues and topics. 1. Document Indexing and Analysis • Data structures and file organizations for IR • Dictionary & postings lists • Index construction & compression • Text representation 2. Information Retrieval Models • Boolean model • Vector space model • Probabilistic model • Language model • Probabilistic latent semantic analysis (PLSA) model 3. Search and Ranking Techniques • Relevance feedback • Query expansion • Weighting and ranking 4. Classification and Clustering • Text classification • Naive Bayes, linear regression and nearest neighbor • Support vector machines & kernel functions • Hierarchical clustering • Partitioning clustering • Density-based clustering • Model-based clustering 5. Evaluation of Information Retrieval Systems • Okapi IR system • Lemur IR system • Smart IR system • Wumpus IR system • Terrier IR system • Zettair IR system • Text REtrieval Conference (TREC): Experiment and Evaluation in IR 6. Information Retrieval Applications • Web search: Google, Yahoo and MSN search engines • Health and biomedical search • Blog search and mining • Enterprise and expert search
    • 49 • Desktop search • Legal search 5. Faculty Resources Faculty members who are most likely to teach this course are: Jimmy Huang, Marin Litoiu, Radu Campeanu and Zijiang Yang. The course will be offered annually. 6. Evaluation Evaluation will be based on assignments and presentations, a final examination and a final course project. The breakdown of the marks will be as follows: 2 Assignments (algorithm/real text data, see above) 20% Presentations and readings 10% Final exam 40% Final course project 40% 7. Bibliography Baeza-Yates, R. and Ribeiro-Neto, B. (1999). Modern Information Retrieval. Addison Wesley Longman. Baldi, P. and Frasconi, P. and Smyth, P. (2003). Modeling the Internet and the Web: Probabilistic Methods and Algorithms. Wiley. Croft, W.B. and Lafferty, J. (2003). Language Modeling for Information Retrieval. Springer. Grossman, D.A. and Frieder, O. (2004). Information Retrieval: Algorithms and Heuristics. Springer. Hersh, W.R. (2002). Information Retrieval: A Health and Biomedical Perspective. Springer. Salton, G. (1989). Automatic Text Processing. Addison-Wesley. Sparck Jones, K. and Willett, P. (1997). Readings in Information Retrieval. Morgan Kaufmann. Van Rijsbergen, C. J. (1979). Information Retrieval. Butterworths. London. Voorhees, E.M. and Harman, D.K. (2005). TREC: Experiment and Evaluation in Information Retrieval. MIT Press. 8. Resources (library/physical/other) See library statement 9. Integrated Courses N/A 10. Crosslisted Courses
    • 50 N/A 11. Rationale As the amount of online textual information (e.g., Web pages, emails, Web blogs, news articles, scientific literatures, and Web server logs) grows explosively, it is increasingly important to develop tools to help us manage and exploit the huge amount of information. Web search engines, such as Google, Yahoo!, and MSN, are good examples of such tools, and they are now an essential part of everyday life. Since IR is one of the most important research areas in Information Technology and there are an increasing number of job positions in search technology related companies such as Google, Yahoo!, and Microsoft, it is important for graduate students in IT to learn the underlying technologies of these and other powerful tools for managing text information. In addition, it is important for graduate students in Information Technology to learn the basic and advanced principles and algorithms for managing text information as well as obtain solid project experience with 1) developing real-world applications such as new tools for personalized search, enterprise search, etc. 2) extending existing tools such as Okapi. To: Radu Campeanu, ITEC Program Jimmy Huang, ITEC Program
    • 51 Sarah Hildebrandt, Coordinator, Academic Planning, Atkinson From: John Dupuis, ITEC Librarian Re: ITEC 6210 3.00 – Advanced Information Retrieval Systems Date: November 12, 2007 I have reviewed the course proposal and attached bibliography for ITEC 6210 -- Advanced Information Retrieval Systems and can state that the York University Libraries have the required resources to support this graduate level course. Please be aware that the library offers the following services to help students with research assignments: • A librarian can introduce students to research techniques, including how to evaluate Internet sources for use in scholarly research. • Individual students can set up consultations with a subject expert to kickstart his or her research project. • Links to online journal and conference articles can be added to the course’s Library Reserves listing The following electronic resources licensed by the library may be of help to the students in this course: • ABI/Inform and Business Source Premier are business research databases which have articles on software engineering / Information Technology topics from a business perspective. • Computer Database is a full-text database of over 200 scholarly and trade publications in the computing field – it is especially useful for product or technology evaluation. • MathSciNet is the main article search engine for mathematics. • INSPEC is the main article search engine for Computer Science. • Gartner Group Intraweb is the Gartner Group’s suite of technology and product evaluation research reports. It is especially good at trend analysis. • IEEE Digital Library with over 160 journals, 5000 conferences and 1400 standards. • ACM Digital Library with all ACM journals, magazines and proceedings. It is particularly good as a source of case studies. • Safari is a technology ebook product which contains 150 titles on various topics including web development, Java, C/C++, Windows, Office, Linux and Unix. If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact me. New Course Proposal 1. Course Number and Title
    • 52 ITEC 6220 3.00 Advanced Information Management 2. Effective Date and Term FW 2009/2010 3. Calendar Course Description This course covers advanced information management system design principles and techniques. Classic topics are covered, but the focus is on non-textbook material originating from research literature and industry. Programming projects are required. Prerequisites: ITEC 3220 or equivalent. 4. Expanded Course Description Information Management Systems are software systems designed to efficiently store, retrieve, manipulate, and query large amounts of data. Since the introduction of the relational data model in 1970, the database management system industry has grown to $100 billion dollars a year and increases by more that 25% every year. With new and emerging applications (e.g., Internet, sensor networks, and data streams) posing new requirements and challenges, the information management market is expected to grow even faster, and information management technologies are constantly evolving to meet the new requirements. The course will be a team effort in which the instructor will provide overviews of topics; some outside industry experts will be invited to talk about the current state of the practice; and teams of students will be asked to contribute by doing literature reviews and technology implementation and comparisons. Topics may vary from year to year, and may include information integration, mobile data management, spatial, temporal, spatio- temporal data management, Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) data management, business intelligence, data streams, and sensor networks. The goal of this course is to expose the students to recent advances in information management technologies, and investigate how the emerging technologies can be deployed in business environments. The scope of this course includes the following topics: 1. Overview of emerging applications, standards, and challenges. 2. Assessment of current modeling and design practices 3. Mobile database management 4. Spatial, temporal, spatio-temporal data management 5. Sensor data management 6. RFID data management 7. Keyword search in information systems 8. Advent of Extensible Markup Language (XML) as a new approach for data interchange, standardization and integration
    • 53 9. Data warehousing and On Line Analytical Processing (OLAP) as application and research areas 10. Supply Chain Management / Customer Relationship Management / Enterprise Resource Planning applications Additional topics may include: 1. Data, process and workflow modeling tools and methodologies 2. Distributed transaction processing / parallel transaction processing and transaction integration technologies. 3. New architectural developments: in mobile area, in interoperability, in data security, peer-to-peer architecture, XML for vertical applications (e.g. justice, health care), etc. The above list has a number of orthogonal topics; yet it is not exhaustive and may be shrunk as well as expanded. Most of the topics (in the first list) will be covered at a general introductory level. Student work in this course will consist of various components: 1. Three programming practice assignments; 2. A team project including a report and class presentation; 3. A written in-depth survey of two of the technologies related to information management. The course involves a large project. It will provide students, upon successful completion, with an appreciation of the intricacies and complexities of an information management system, and enable them to design and implement the major components of it. 5. Faculty Resources Faculty most likely to teach this course include: Xiaohui Yu, Jimmy Huang. Zijiang Yang is also qualified to teach this course. 6. Evaluation Evaluation will be based on assignments, a team project, and an in-depth survey. The breakdown of the marks will be as follows: Assignments (3) 30% Project 50% Survey 20% Projects will be carried out in teams. A detailed handout about the project will be distributed at the beginning of the course, along with a list of suggested projects. The goal of the project is to give the participants the opportunity to tackle a large, interesting problem, which may lead to a publication. The projects will be evaluated based on the following criteria: • Original content.
    • 54 • Demonstration of technical knowledge. • Well-prepared reports and presentation. • Individual contribution and team organization. • Timeliness and availability of the proposal and the final report. In addition to evaluating the team as a whole, individual contributions will also be considered through intra-team evaluations (students evaluating other team members’ contributions). 7. Bibliography JP Morgenthal, Enterprise Information Integration: A Pragmatic Approach, lulu.com, 2005. B. Glover and H. Bhatt, RFID Essentials, O'Reilly Media, Inc., 2006. R. Ramakrishnan and J. Gehrke, Database Management Systems (3rd ed.), McGraw-Hill, 2002. M. Stonebraker and J. Hellerstein, Readings in Database Systems (3rd ed.), Morgan Kaufmann, 1998. J. Han and M. Kamber, Data Mining: Concepts and Techniques (2nd ed.), Morgan Kaufmann, 2006. 8. Resources (library/physical/other) See library statement 9. Integrated Courses N/A 10. Crosslisted Courses N/A 11. Rationale This course is one of the courses in the MAIST core, from which students will choose a specified number of credits, depending on degree option. According to the Carnegie Mellon School and its followers, information management, i.e., the organization's ability to process information, is at the core of organizational and managerial competencies. This course will expose the students to recent research developments in this important area, and provide them with an opportunity to apply the new technologies to real-world problems. This course is significantly different from CSE 6421. While CSE 6421 covers the classical topics in database management systems with an emphasis on the design and implementation of the relational database management software, the proposed ITEC 6220 aims at providing an overview of emerging information management technologies, with a focus on the application and deployment of suitable technologies to meet the needs
    • 55 arising from enterprise information systems. To: Radu Campeanu, ITEC Program
    • 56 Jimmy Huang, ITEC Program Sarah Hildebrandt, Coordinator, Academic Planning, Atkinson From: John Dupuis, ITEC Librarian Re: ITEC 6220 3.00 – Advanced Information Management Date: June 6, 2008 I have reviewed the course proposal and attached bibliography for ITEC 6220 3.00 – Advanced Information Management and can state that the York University Libraries have the required resources to support this graduate level course. Please be aware that the library offers the following services to help students with research assignments: • A librarian can introduce students to research techniques, including how to evaluate Internet sources for use in scholarly research. • Individual students can set up consultations with a subject expert to kickstart his or her research project. • Links to online journal and conference articles can be added to the course’s Library Reserves listing The following electronic resources licensed by the library may be of help to the students in this course: • ABI/Inform and Business Source Premier are business research databases which have articles on software engineering / Information Technology topics from a business perspective. • Computer Database is a full-text database of over 200 scholarly and trade publications in the computing field – it is especially useful for product or technology evaluation. • MathSciNet is the main article search engine for mathematics. • INSPEC is the main article search engine for Computer Science. • Books 24x7 is an Information Technology ebooks package which covers all the relevant areas. • IEEE Digital Library with over 160 journals, 5000 conferences and 1400 standards. • ACM Digital Library with all ACM journals, magazines and proceedings. It is particularly good as a source of case studies. • Safari is a technology ebook product which contains 150 titles on various topics including web development, Java, C/C++, Windows, Office, Linux and Unix. If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact me. New Course Proposal
    • 57 1. Course Number and Title ITEC 6230 3.0: Health Information Systems 2. Effective Date and Term Winter 2010 3. Calendar Course Description One of the major aims of Health Information Management is to help health professionals make better decisions. This course reviews theories, methods, technologies and systems currently used for aiding the decision making process. Prerequisites: ITEC 6310 4. Expanded Course Description One of the major aims of Health Information Management is to help health professionals make better decisions. To this end, diverse models and methods of decision making and decision support have been developed and implemented in health care settings. This course reviews theories, methods, and technologies for aiding the process of making decisions in health care. This course represents a comprehensive approach of information management, record management, policy and planning. It provides students with the knowledge and skills to manage health information services in health organizations, to use computer technologies to collect, manage analyze and technically evaluate health information and work with confidential health records. Topics Include: • The evolution of healthcare information • The role of information Systems • Decision making and Decision support in Healthcare • Decision Support Systems and their impact on the future Health Decision Making • Integrating data into Management Information Systems • Informatics in Healthcare: Managing Organizational Change • Electronic Health Record This course examines also the forces outside healthcare facilities that directly affect the collection, maintenance and dissemination of health information. Topics include international trends in healthcare, federal and state government regulations, national trends in healthcare delivery and technology 5. Faculty Resources
    • 58 Currently there are two faculty members qualified to teach this course: Dr. Serban Dinca- Panaitescu, Dr. Radu Campeanu Offered every two years in the Winter term 6. Evaluation 30% Case study – written (15 pages) The student is expected to write an argumentative essay based on a case study provided by the instructor. The grade for this assignment includes the student’s participation to the in-class debate of the case study. 20% Student Presentation The student is expected to make a presentation on a topic provided by the instructor. This will be evaluated by the instructor and the peers in the class. 50% Research project – written (25 pages) The student is expected to undertake a project that will apply the knowledge from the lectures, seminar and laboratory. This project will explore the information management needs or systems in various healthcare Organizations. 7. Bibliography Selected chapters from the following textbooks Healthcare Information Management Systems: Cases, Strategies, and Solutions by Marion J. Ball (Author), Charlotte Weaver (Author), Joan M. Kiel (Author), Springer (3rd ed), 2004. Health Information Management: Concepts, Principles and Practice by Kathleen M. LaTour (Author), Shirley Eichenwald (Author), AHIMA (American Health Information Management Association) (2nd ed), 2006 Articles Beverley, C. A., Booth, A., & Bath, P. A. (2003). The role of the information specialist in the systematic review process: A health information case study. Health Information and Libraries Journal, 20(2), 65-74. Blick, K. E. (2001). The essential role of information management in point-of- care/critical care testing. Clinica Chimica Acta, 307(1-2), 159-168.
    • 59 Bowns, I. R., Rotherham, G., & Paisley, S. (1999). Factors associated with success in the implementation of information management and technology in the NHS. Health Informatics Journal, 5(3), 136-145. David, W., & Teresa, W. (2000). The information management and technology strategy of the UK national health service – determining progress in the NHS acute hospital sector. International Journal of Public Sector Management, 13(3), 241-259. Hall, A., & Walton, G. (2004). Information overload within the health care system: A literature review. Health Information and Libraries Journal, 21(2), 102-108. Hugh, S. (2000). Information requirements for clinical governance. Clinical Performance and Quality Health Care, 8(1), 52-57. John, H. (1997). Process improvement and information management. Health Manpower Management, 23(5), 184-186. Justin, K., & Nicole, M. (1995). Information strategy in the NHS. Journal of Management in Medicine, 9(2), 57-62. Lappas, E. (2002). Information management in community health and primary care. Health Information and Libraries Journal, 19(4), 236-238. Lenz, R., & Kuhn, K. A. (2004). Towards a continuous evolution and adaptation of information systems in healthcare. International Journal of Medical Informatics, 73(1), 75-89. McSean, T., van Loo, J., Coutinho, E., & Robinson, L. (1996). Health information, new possibilities. International Journal of Information Management, 16(3), 235-236. Norris, A. C. (2002). Current trends and challenges in health informatics. Health Informatics Journal, 8(4), 205-213. Noseworthy, T., & Watanabe, M. (1999). Health policy directions for evidence-based decision making in canada. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice, 5(2), 227-242. Paul, M. J. (1997). Integrating information systems and health care. Logistics Information Management, 10(4), 140-145. S., K. M., Rico, S. Y., & Yolande, E. C. (2003). Privacy in canadian health Networks: challenges and opportunities. Leadership in Health Services, 16(1), 1-10. Sarmad, A., Farouk, M., & Tillal, E. (2003). Healthcare information management: the integration of patient’s data. Logistics Information Management, 16(3/4), 286-295.
    • 60 Thornett, A. M. (2001). Computer decision support systems in general practice. International Journal of Information Management, 21(1), 39-47. 8. Resources (library/physical/other) See library statement. This course will require access to a computer lab for practical work and research purposes. Software needed includes MATLAB for simulations, statistical software (SPSS) and demo software from various Medical Information Systems Companies. This software is available to students in the TEL building labs and/or online through WebAcadLabs. 9. Integrated Courses N/A 10. Crosslisted Courses N/A 11. Rationale This course is one of the courses in the MAIST core, from which students will choose a specified number of credits, depending on degree option. Health Information Management (HIM) is one of the fastest growing fields in healthcare, and HIM professionals are in high demand across the nation. Public health facilities, hospitals, or consulting firms all need well-educated HIM professionals to lead the Health System change. ITEC 6230 will explore issues relating to the user's perspective on information management and decision making in healthcare; however, the course is distinct in emphasizing these issues in the context of the analysis, design and implementation of health information management systems. To: Radu Campeanu, ITEC Program Jimmy Huang, ITEC Program Sarah Hildebrandt, Coordinator, Academic Planning, Atkinson
    • 61 From: John Dupuis, ITEC Librarian Re: ITEC 6230 – Hospital Imaging Systems Date: November 12, 2007 I have reviewed the course proposal and attached bibliography for ITEC 6230 – Hospital Imaging Systems and can state that the York University Libraries have the required resources to support this graduate level course. Please be aware that the library offers the following services to help students with research assignments: • A librarian can introduce students to research techniques, including how to evaluate Internet sources for use in scholarly research. • Individual students can set up consultations with a subject expert to kickstart his or her research project. • Links to online journal and conference articles can be added to the course’s Library Reserves listing The following electronic resources licensed by the library may be of help to the students in this course: • ABI/Inform and Business Source Premier are business research databases which have articles on software engineering / Information Technology topics from a business perspective. • Computer Database is a full-text database of over 200 scholarly and trade publications in the computing field – it is especially useful for product or technology evaluation. • Factiva and Canadian Newsstand are full text newspaper sources. • Pubmed is the main article search engine for medical applications. • INSPEC is the main article search engine for Computer Science. • Gartner Group Intraweb is the Gartner Group’s suite of technology and product evaluation research reports. It is especially good at trend analysis. • IEEE Digital Library with over 160 journals, 5000 conferences and 1400 standards. • ACM Digital Library with all ACM journals, magazines and proceedings. It is particularly good as a source of case studies. • Safari is a technology ebook product which contains 150 titles on various topics including web development, Java, C/C++, Windows, Office, Linux. If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact me. New Course Proposal 1. Course Number and Title ITEC 6320 3.00 - Information Technology and Organizational Strategy
    • 62 2. Effective Date and Term FW 2009/10 3. Calendar Course Description This course examines the use of information technology (IT) for supporting organizational strategies. An organization’s long term dynamic plan drives its use of IT such as enterprise resource planning and customer relationship management systems. This course will examine the symbiotic relationship between IT and strategy. Prerequisite: 6 credits in the MAIST program. 4. Expanded Course Description This is an integrative course, which deals with the use of information technology (IT) for supporting various organizational strategies. It builds on students’ undergraduate IT backgrounds as well as complementing other MAIST courses. An organization’s strategy or long term dynamic plan, which outlines organizational goals and objectives, drives the use of IT such as enterprise resource planning and customer relationship management systems. This course will examine the symbiotic relationship over time between IT and strategy. The following topics will be covered in the course: 1. Fusion of organizational strategy and information technology 2. A review and analysis of strategy 3. The evaluation of information technology 4. Organizational impacts of information use 5. Information technology and the design of work 6. Strategic use of information resources 7. Information technology and changing business processes 8. Architecture and infrastructure 9. The business of e-business 10. The management information systems organization 11. Different types of information technology strategies 12. Strategic trends in information technology. Each week, students will submit a journal that is a critical assessment of one of the assigned readings. Two quizzes will be administered during the term to test the students on the course content. Students will be placed in groups of two or three to undertake field projects where they examine the use of information technology for supporting a firm’s strategy. In addition each student will write a research paper on some question on the relationship between information technology and organizational strategy. The chosen topic can be set in the context of a profit pursuing, non-profit, or government organization. 5. Faculty Resources
    • 63 Faculty members who are most likely to teach this course are: Gary Spraakman and Cristobal Sanchez-Rodriguez. Gary Spraakman will likely teach the course. The course will be offered annually. The course will consist of one three-hour lecture each week for one term. 6. Evaluation Paper 30% Case study 30% Quizzes 10% Journals 10% Participation 20% 100% 7. Bibliography Keri E. Pearlman, Managing and Using Information Systems: A Strategic Approach, New York, Wiley, 2001. John Hagel III and John S. Brown, "Your Next IT Strategy," Harvard Business Review, October 2001, pp. 92-113. Don Tapscott, David Ticoll, Alex Lowry, Digital Capital: Harnessing the Power of Business Webs, Cambridge, Harvard Business School Press, 2000. Henry Mintzberg, The Rise and Fall of Strategic Planning, New York, Free Press, 1994. Alfred D. Chandler, Jr. and James W. Cortada (eds.) A Nation Transformed by Information: How Information has Shaped the United States from Colonial Times to the Present, Oxford, Oxford University Press, 2000. John Roberts, The Modern Firm, Oxford University Press, 2004. Don Tapscott and Anthony Williams, Wikinomics: How Mass Collaboration Changes Everything, Portfolio, 2006. 8. Resources (library/physical/other) See library statement. The computer resources in the new ITEC lab in the TEL building will be sufficient for the presentation of this course material. 9. Integrated Courses N/A 10. Crosslisted Courses N/A 11. Rationale This course is one of the courses in the MAIST core, from which students will choose a specified number of credits, depending on degree option. It introduces organizational strategy as a means of integrating the knowledge and skills in advanced applied information technology developed in the MAIST, which are examined from the
    • 64 perspectives of the literature and a field study of an organization's strategy and what can improve it. To: Radu Campeanu, ITEC Program Jimmy Huang, ITEC Program Sarah Hildebrandt, Coordinator, Academic Planning, Atkinson
    • 65 From: John Dupuis, ITEC Librarian Re: ITEC 6320 – Information Technology and Organizational Strategy Date: November 12, 2007 I have reviewed the course proposal and attached bibliography for ITEC 6320 – Information Technology and Organizational Strategy and can state that the York University Libraries have the required resources to support this graduate level course. Please be aware that the library offers the following services to help students with research assignments: • A librarian can introduce students to research techniques, including how to evaluate Internet sources for use in scholarly research. • Individual students can set up consultations with a subject expert to kickstart his or her research project. • Links to online journal and conference articles can be added to the course’s Library Reserves listing The following electronic resources licensed by the library may be of help to the students in this course: • ABI/Inform and Business Source Premier are business research databases which have articles on software engineering / Information Technology topics from a business perspective. • Computer Database is a full-text database of over 200 scholarly and trade publications in the computing field – it is especially useful for product or technology evaluation. • Factiva and Canadian Newsstand are full text newspaper sources. • INSPEC is the main article search engine for Computer Science. • Gartner Group Intraweb is the Gartner Group’s suite of technology and product evaluation research reports. It is especially good at trend analysis. • IEEE Digital Library with over 160 journals, 5000 conferences and 1400 standards. • ACM Digital Library with all ACM journals, magazines and proceedings. It is particularly good as a source of case studies. • Safari is a technology ebook product which contains 150 titles on various topics including web development, Java, C/C++, Windows, Office, Linux. If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact me. New Course Proposal 1. Course Number and Title: ITEC 6330 3.00 - Designing and Building E-Business Applications
    • 66 2. Effective Date and Term: FW 2009/10 3. Calendar Course Description This course introduces students to advanced techniques for designing and building e- business applications, exposing students to core technologies for analyzing, designing and implementing e-business applications. Students develop an understanding of how these core technologies can be applied to solve real-world problems. Prerequisite: ITEC 4020 or equivalent 4. Expanded Course Description With the increased use of the World Wide Web (WWW) in business applications, many organizations have moved or are moving towards interactive, WWW-based information systems to extend services to clients. With the World Wide Web thriving, designing and building e-business applications is becoming an important field and a booming industry. The newest prevailing communication vehicle, the Internet, has redefined the way the world is operating and how people are interacting. We can shop without going to the mall. We can research virtually any topic. We can communicate with friends across the globe at the touch of a button. We can access libraries from our homes. These conveniences that have become commonplace in the twenty-first century are made possible due to different kinds of e-business applications, such as Internet banking information systems, online investment information systems, digital library information systems and Internet group benefit information systems. This course emphasizes advanced principles and presents some practical methods for designing and implementing modern Internet e-business applications. The major objective of this course is for students to learn how to analyze, design and implement e-business applications and obtain a solid grasp of how these core technologies can be applied to solve real-world problems. The course is lecture-based. Grading is based on readings & presentations on current research literature, a final examination and a large research-based project. There is a big research component in this course. The final course project generally involves implementing and experimenting with an e-business application. It will give students hands-on experience in developing e-business applications. The course will cover the following issues and topics. 1. Building E-Business Applications and Techniques • Static and Dynamic Web sites • Interactive E-Business Applications • Secured E-Business Applications • Common Gateway Interface (CGI) programming  CGI: Beyond Hyper Text Markup Language (HTML)  HTML Forms
    • 67  Environment Variables  GET & POST  Outputting PDF and Graphics  Sending E-mail Using CGI  Writing Secure CGIs • Servlets, Java Server Pages (JSP) 2. Advanced Java Programming for Building E-business Applications • Handling Mouse and Keyboard Event • Java Native Interface (JNI) • Accessing Data from Java Database Connectivity (JDBC) • Advanced Graphical User Interface (GUI) programming with Swing • Multithreaded programming  Parallel Computing and Multithreading  Creating and Managing Threads  Synchronizing Threads  Portable Operating System Interface (POSIX) Multithreaded Programming • Socket Programming  Creaking and Using a Socket  Host Names and IP Addresses  Client-Server Processing  URL Connections 7. Evaluation of E-Business Applications 8. Security and Privacy of E-Business Applications 9. Case Studies for Building E-Business Applications: • Internet Banking Application • Online Investment Application • Digital Library Application • Internet Group Benefit Application • Online Recommendation Application • Web Search Application 5. Faculty Resources Faculty members who are most likely to teach this course are Jimmy Huang, Marin Litoiu. The course will be offered annually. 6. Evaluation Evaluation will be based on presentations and readings, a final examination and a final course project. The breakdown of the marks will be as follows: Readings and presentations 20%
    • 68 Final exam 30% Final course project 50% 7. Bibliography Chang, G. and Healey, M. J. et al. (2003). Mining the World Wide Web: An Information Search Approach. Kluwer Academic Publishers. Deitel M., Deitel J. and Nieto, T.R.(2002). Internet and World Wide Web: How to Program. Hall, M. and Brown, L. (2004). Core Web Programming. Prentice Hall PTR Book. ISBN 0-13-089793-0. 2nd Edition. Sarukkai, R. (2003). Foundations of Web Technology. Kluwer Academic Publishers. ISBN 1-4020-7166-3. Bai, X. and Farrell, J. et al. (2005). The Web Warrior Guide to Web Programming. ISBN: 0-6190-6458-7, 2005. Sparck Jones, K. and Willett, P. (1997). Readings in Information Retrieval. Morgan Kaufmann. 8. Resources (library/physical/other) See library statement 9. Integrated Courses N/A 10. Crosslisted Courses N/A 11. Rationale Designing and building e-business applications offer versatile career opportunities. Such jobs include e-business application design and development, e-commerce information system design and development, IT management, statistician, Internet system analyst, network administration, project management, and client-server system technical supports. The growth of e-business information systems is resulting in an unparalleled demand for these professionals. Offering a course on designing and building e-business applications is important for our graduate students to find a job in industry. This course is one of the courses in the MAIST core, from which students will choose a specified number of credits, depending on degree option. ITEC 6330 develops advanced skills, with the expectation that students have knowledge equivalent to that developed in two ITEC undergraduate courses: ITEC 3020 Web Technologies and ITEC 4020 Internet Client Server Systems. One other course at York, CSE 4413 Building E-Commerce Systems, addresses, at an undergraduate level, some of the topics covered in depth in the proposed ITEC 6330. For example, CSE 4413 spends considerable time teaching XML, which students in ITEC 6330 will have learned in ITEC undergraduate courses (or their equivalent). As a result, CSE 4413 spends less time discussing specific E-Commerce applications, whereas ITEC
    • 69 6330 discusses these at length, including a unit on case studies examining how specific applications can be used to solve problems in a variety of settings. Unlike the ITEC and CSE undergraduate courses, the graduate ITEC 6330 emphasizes research. Finally, students in CSE 4413 learn C# to develop applications for Windows systems; students in the proposed ITEC 6330 learn advanced Java to develop applications for Linux systems. To: Radu Campeanu, ITEC Program Jimmy Huang, ITEC Program Sarah Hildebrandt, Coordinator, Academic Planning, Atkinson From: John Dupuis, ITEC Librarian
    • 70 Re: ITEC 6330 – Designing and Building E-Business Applications Date: November 12, 2007 I have reviewed the course proposal and attached bibliography for ITEC 6330 – Designing and Building E-Business Applications and can state that the York University Libraries have the required resources to support this graduate level course. Please be aware that the library offers the following services to help students with research assignments: • A librarian can introduce students to research techniques, including how to evaluate Internet sources for use in scholarly research. • Individual students can set up consultations with a subject expert to kickstart his or her research project. • Links to online journal and conference articles can be added to the course’s Library Reserves listing The following electronic resources licensed by the library may be of help to the students in this course: • ABI/Inform and Business Source Premier are business research databases which have articles on software engineering / Information Technology topics from a business perspective. • Computer Database is a full-text database of over 200 scholarly and trade publications in the computing field – it is especially useful for product or technology evaluation. • Factiva and Canadian Newsstand are full text newspaper sources. • INSPEC is the main article search engine for Computer Science. • Gartner Group Intraweb is the Gartner Group’s suite of technology and product evaluation research reports. It is especially good at trend analysis. • IEEE Digital Library with over 160 journals, 5000 conferences and 1400 standards. • ACM Digital Library with all ACM journals, magazines and proceedings. It is particularly good as a source of case studies. • Safari is a technology ebook product which contains 150 titles on various topics including web development, Java, C/C++, Windows, Office, Linux. If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact me. New Course Proposal 1. Course Number and Title: ITEC 6970 3.00 – Advanced Topics in Information Technology 2. Effective Date and Term:
    • 71 FW 2009/10 3. Calendar Course Description Introduces emerging and “hot” topics in information technology discussed in the research literature. Topics will rotate annually and will focus on a specific area of interest to the instructor that is not covered in existing courses. Proposed topics include information systems security, service-oriented architecture, management of IT, web services. Prerequisite: None 6. Expanded Course Description The goal of this course is to provide students with an understanding of “hot topics” in IT. The goal of this course is also to give the instructor and graduate students the opportunity to delve into a focused research area. Proposed topics in ITEC 6970 include (but are not limited to) information systems security, service-oriented architecture, management of IT, web services. Upon completion of this course, students should be able to: • Have a deep understanding of the concepts covered • Comprehensively and critically review the literature on the topic covered • Explain how the topic covered affects the IT needs of modern organizations • Write a substantial research paper dealing in some way with the topic covered. Weekly topics and readings will vary depending on the topic covered. 5. Faculty Resources Faculty most likely to teach this course include Y. Benslimane, L. Cysneiros, Z. Yang, R. Campeanu, J. Huang, M. Litoiu, and X. Yu. The course will be offered annually. 6. Evaluation The breakdown of the marks will be as follows: Assignment 10% Research Proposal 40% Final Exam 40% Project presentation 10% 7. Bibliography Weekly topics and readings will vary depending on the topic covered. Readings will include a collection of relevant articles from leading IT-related journals. 8. Resources (library/physical/other) Readings will include a collection of relevant articles from leading IT-related journals.
    • 72 York University libraries provide online indexes and databases of IT-related journals (ABI Inform, ACM Digital Library, IEEE Xplore, etc.) See library statement. 9. Integrated Courses N/A 10. Crosslisted Courses N/A 11. Rationale This course is part of the proposed Master of Arts in Information Systems and Technology (MAIST). This course allows graduate students and instructors to cover emerging and “hot” topics in IT. It also provides them with the opportunity to delve into a focused research area of these emerging “hot” topics. To: Radu Campeanu, ITEC Program Jimmy Huang, ITEC Program Sarah Hildebrandt, Coordinator, Academic Planning, Atkinson From: John Dupuis, ITEC Librarian
    • 73 Re: ITEC 6970– Advanced Special Topics in Information Technology Date: November 12, 2007 I have reviewed the course proposal and attached bibliography for ITEC 6970– Advanced Special Topics in Information Technology and can state that the York University Libraries have the required resources to support this graduate level course. Please be aware that the library offers the following services to help students with research assignments: • A librarian can introduce students to research techniques, including how to evaluate Internet sources for use in scholarly research. • Individual students can set up consultations with a subject expert to kickstart his or her research project. • Links to online journal and conference articles can be added to the course’s Library Reserves listing The following electronic resources licensed by the library may be of help to the students in this course: • ABI/Inform and Business Source Premier are business research databases which have articles on software engineering / Information Technology topics from a business perspective. • Computer Database is a full-text database of over 200 scholarly and trade publications in the computing field – it is especially useful for product or technology evaluation. • MathSciNet is the main article search engine for mathematics. • INSPEC is the main article search engine for Computer Science. • Gartner Group Intraweb is the Gartner Group’s suite of technology and product evaluation research reports. It is especially good at trend analysis. • IEEE Digital Library with over 160 journals, 5000 conferences and 1400 standards. • ACM Digital Library with all ACM journals, magazines and proceedings. It is particularly good as a source of case studies. • Safari is a technology ebook product which contains 150 titles on various topics including web development, Java, C/C++, Windows, Office, Linux. If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact me. New Course Proposal 1. Course Number and Title: ITEC 6002 3.00 – Directed Readings
    • 74 2. Effective Date and Term: FW 2009/10 3. Calendar Course Description Prerequisite: permission of graduate program director and course director. 4. Expanded Course Description A student may count Directed Readings towards the credits required for the degree, subject to the permission of the graduate program director and the instructor who will be directing the course. Topics will depend on student and course director interests but will not cover the same material as other MAIST courses offered in the same year. 5. Faculty Resources Will vary based on content. Offered on demand, subject to the approval of the graduate program director and the course director. 6. Evaluation Will vary based on content. 7. Bibliography Will vary based on content. 8. Resources (library/physical/other) N/A 9. Integrated Courses N/A 10. Crosslisted Courses N/A 11. Rationale The proposed course will provide one on one interaction between the course director and the student. Students will be able to undertake in depth readings focused on an advanced topic of mutual interest. To: Radu Campeanu, ITEC Program Jimmy Huang, ITEC Program Sarah Hildebrandt, Coordinator, Academic Planning, Atkinson From: John Dupuis, ITEC Librarian
    • 75 Re: ITEC 6002 – Directed Reading on Advanced Topics in Information Retrieval Date: November 12, 2007 I have reviewed the course proposal and attached bibliography for ITEC 6002 – Directed Reading on Advanced Topics in Information Retrieval and can state that the York University Libraries have the required resources to support this graduate level course. Please be aware that the library offers the following services to help students with research assignments: • A librarian can introduce students to research techniques, including how to evaluate Internet sources for use in scholarly research. • Individual students can set up consultations with a subject expert to kickstart his or her research project. • Links to online journal and conference articles can be added to the course’s Library Reserves listing The following electronic resources licensed by the library may be of help to the students in this course: • ABI/Inform and Business Source Premier are business research databases which have articles on software engineering / Information Technology topics from a business perspective. • Computer Database is a full-text database of over 200 scholarly and trade publications in the computing field – it is especially useful for product or technology evaluation. • MathSciNet is the main bibliographic database for mathematics. • INSPEC is the main article search engine for Computer Science. • Gartner Group Intraweb is the Gartner Group’s suite of technology and product evaluation research reports. It is especially good at trend analysis. • IEEE Digital Library with over 160 journals and 5000. • ACM Digital Library with all ACM journals, magazines and proceedings. It is particularly good as a source of case studies. • Safari is a technology ebook product which contains 150 titles on various topics including web development, Java, C/C++, Windows, Office, Linux.
    • 76 If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact me.