IBM's Approach to SOA Governance
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IBM's Approach to SOA Governance

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  • 1. This Presentation Courtesy of the International SOA Symposium October 7-8, 2008 Amsterdam Arena www.soasymposium.com info@soasymposium.com Founding Sponsors Platinum Sponsors Gold Sponsors Silver Sponsors SOA Symposium October 7-8, 2008, Amsterdam ESB Reference Architecture and Product Selection Guidelines André Tost Senior Technical Staff Member, SOA Technology IBM Software Services for WebSphere © 2008 IBM Corporation 1
  • 2. SOA Symposium Agenda  Introduction  Definition / Reference Architecture  Patterns  Federation  Product Selection Criteria  Sample Scenarios 3 ESB Reference Architecture and Product Selection Guidelines © 2008 IBM Corporation SOA Symposium Introduction 4 ESB Reference Architecture and Product Selection Guidelines © 2008 IBM Corporation 2
  • 3. SOA Symposium SOA Addresses Many Perspectives Business Services SOA Entry Points Infrastructure & Management in Support of SOA Service Management Service Security Business Process Management Service Virtualization SOA Governance and Service Lifecycle Management 5 ESB Reference Architecture and Product Selection Guidelines © 2008 IBM Corporation SOA Symposium SOA Entry Points Help You Get Started Both Business Centric and IT Focused What is it? Value Improved productivity and flexibility by enabling targeted user Deliver role-based interaction and collaboration interactions for improved business operations and collaboration People through services Achieve business process innovation through Greater innovation and flexibility treating tasks as modular services through faster deployment and Process modification of business processes Provide trusted information in business context Better business operations, more informed decisions and reduced by treating it as a service risk with information delivered in-line and in-context Information Service-enable existing assets and fill portfolio Lower risk and faster time to market gaps with new reusable services by leveraging proven, time-tested functionality Reuse Connect systems, users, and business channels Reduced maintenance costs and Connectivity based on open standards greater reliability and consistency through flexible, any-to-any linkages 6 ESB Reference Architecture and Product Selection Guidelines © 2008 IBM Corporation 3
  • 4. SOA Symposium What are some of today's business challenges that SOA Connectivity can address? How do you…?  Ensure seamless flow of information from anywhere at anytime using anything  Execute broad business processes that span your company and business partners?  Build trusted relationships with your partners?  Scale your business to grow smoothly?  Deliver a consistent user experience regardless of channel or device? 7 ESB Reference Architecture and Product Selection Guidelines © 2008 IBM Corporation SOA Symposium How do you connect the assets and services that support your business process? Connectivity needs Enable "any-to-any" linkage and communication inside and beyond your company Simplify connectivity by ensuring secure, reliable, and scaleable pipeline of information 8 ESB Reference Architecture and Product Selection Guidelines © 2008 IBM Corporation 4
  • 5. SOA Symposium Business Value… …Through SOA Connectivity …by exposing the same process Deliver a secure, consistent user through new business channels and experience… devices Strengthen trading partner …with managed Service-based relationships… connections … over custom-built or traditional Potential savings of 2X-4X… connectivity* Minimize complexity in your … through any-to-every connectivity organization… …through scaleable access to Increased business flexibility and information in the right format and at responsiveness… the right time …by extending IT assets rather than Eliminate redundancy… duplicating them Decreased development and … through decoupling of function maintenance costs… and interface *Software Strategies “Enterprise Integration Challenge” 2005 9 ESB Reference Architecture and Product Selection Guidelines © 2008 IBM Corporation SOA Symposium Three examples of SOA connectivity Deliver a process across multiple business channels Connect to Connect external service business providers systems 1. Internal connectivity based on open standards 2. Deliver an existing process through new business channels 3. Securely connect to external 3rd parties and trading partners 10 ESB Reference Architecture and Product Selection Guidelines © 2008 IBM Corporation 5
  • 6. SOA Symposium ESB Definition 11 ESB Reference Architecture and Product Selection Guidelines © 2008 IBM Corporation SOA Symposium Core Principles of the ESB Architectural Pattern Service Service Requestor ESB Provider  ESB inter-connects requester and provider – Interactions are decoupled – Supports key SOA principle – separation of concerns  ESB provides Service Virtualization of – Identity via routing – Interaction via conversion – Interface via transformation  ESB also enables Aspect Oriented Connectivity – Security – Management – Logging – Auditing – … 12 ESB Reference Architecture and Product Selection Guidelines © 2008 IBM Corporation 6
  • 7. SOA Symposium An ESB-centric view of the Logical Model Business Services IT Management Services Security Interaction Process Information Development Services ESB Registry Management Business Services Partner Business App Access  Outside ESB  Tightly coupled to ESB – Business Logic (Business Services) – Service Registry – ESB does contain integration logic or connectivity logic – Registry is a Policy Decision Point for ESB – Criteria: semantics versus syntax; aspects – ESB is a Policy Enforcement Point for Registry – But, Registry has a broader scope in SOA  Loosely coupled to ESB – Security and Management  Tooling required for ESB – Policy Decision Point outside the ESB – Development – ESB can be Policy Enforcement Point – Administration – Configuring ESB via Service Registry 13 ESB Reference Architecture and Product Selection Guidelines © 2008 IBM Corporation SOA Symposium Expanded view of the ESB Enterprise Service Bus Mediation Flows Mediation Patterns Message Models Meta models Communication Protocols Interaction Patterns  Communication Protocols – Supply basic connectivity to requesters and providers – Impact QoS (e.g., reliable delivery, transactions) – Supply inherent Interaction Patterns (e.g., request/reply, one-way, pub/sub)  An ESB leverages underlying communication fabrics of SOA infrastructure – ESB provides on-ramps and off-ramps  Typical requirements  Standards are important – HTTP (SOAP/HTTP, XML/HTTP) – MQ (SOAP/JMS/MQ, XML/MQ, text/MQ, …) – Adapters (legacy, EIS) – WS-I, WS-Security – RAMP 14 ESB Reference Architecture and Product Selection Guidelines © 2008 IBM Corporation 7
  • 8. SOA Symposium Expanded view of the ESB Enterprise Service Bus Mediation Flows Mediation Patterns Message Models Meta models Communication Protocols Interaction Patterns  Message Models – Describe messages exchanged with requesters and providers – Based on Meta-models – Fundamental means of describing messages  Typical requirements – For example, XML Schema language – XML schema definition – Content models define specific messages – Industry specific content models – For example, XML schema  An ESB supports one or more message meta-models  An ESB supports multiple message content models – Can include industry standard models as well as enterprise specific models – Can include weakly-typed models 15 ESB Reference Architecture and Product Selection Guidelines © 2008 IBM Corporation SOA Symposium Expanded view of the ESB Enterprise Service Bus Mediation Flows Mediation Patterns Message Models Meta models Communication Protocols Interaction Patterns  Mediation Flows – Process messages exchanged between requester and provider via ESB – Large grained – Moderately reusable – Constructed from Mediation Patterns – Mediation Patterns define processing “steps” of a mediation flow – Small to middle grained  Typical requirements – Highly reusable – Dynamic routing – ESB products include pre-built “mediation primitives” – Logging 16 ESB Reference Architecture and Product Selection Guidelines © 2008 IBM Corporation 8
  • 9. SOA Symposium ESB Mediation Flows and Mediation Patterns  Mediation enables Service Virtualization of – Identity via routing – Using basic mediation patterns (context, content, contract) – Using composed mediation patterns (retry, failover, Distribution/aggregation, …) – Dynamic, driven by metadata in registry – Impact aspects of QoS (e.g., SLA, failover) – Interaction (of protocol and pattern) via conversion – Protocol conversion inherent with support for more than one transport protocol – Impact aspects of QoS (e.g., reliable delivery, transactions) – Interface via transformation – Using specific mediation patterns – Using adapters – Impact aspects of QoS (e.g., performance) – NOTE: other forms of mediation should be agnostic to interface (weakly-typed processing)  Mediation enables Aspect Oriented Connectivity – Security & Management – Logging – Auditing – …  Provided by a mediation framework – Offering pre-built mediation pattern (primitives) support – Enabling mediation pattern composition 17 ESB Reference Architecture and Product Selection Guidelines © 2008 IBM Corporation SOA Symposium Mediation Patterns - Examples Request / Request / Multi Event Response Response Propagation Protocol Switch Transform Enrich Route Distribute Monitor Correlate + + + Canonical Transform – Log - Route Gateway Adapter 18 ESB Reference Architecture and Product Selection Guidelines © 2008 IBM Corporation 9
  • 10. SOA Symposium Adapters for Existing Systems Integration  An ESB must allow access to existing Enterprise Information Systems  Adapters typically used, and may or may not be part of the ESB – Technology – Application – Legacy  The following are the placement options for adapters, based on domain where adapter configuration managed: – Outside of the ESB, and inside the EIS domain – Outside the ESB, and the EIS domain – On the boundary of the ESB – Inside the ESB 19 ESB Reference Architecture and Product Selection Guidelines © 2008 IBM Corporation SOA Symposium ESB Patterns 20 ESB Reference Architecture and Product Selection Guidelines © 2008 IBM Corporation 10
  • 11. SOA Symposium ESB Patterns Global ESB  All services in one namespace  All services have visibility to each other  Centrally Administered  Used by departments or small enterprises (or for development & test environments) Requester Provider ESB Requester Provider 21 ESB Reference Architecture and Product Selection Guidelines © 2008 IBM Corporation SOA Symposium ESB Patterns ESB Gateway  Controlled and Secure service interactions at internal or external domain boundaries Requester Provider ESB ESB ESB Requester Provider 22 ESB Reference Architecture and Product Selection Guidelines © 2008 IBM Corporation 11
  • 12. SOA Symposium ESB Patterns Brokered ESB  Bridge services that selectively expose requesters or providers  Each ESB manages its own namespace.  Service interactions between ESBs facilitated through a common broker that implements the bridge services.  Used by departments that develop and manage their own services, but share a few of them Provider Requester ES ES ES B B B Provider Requester ES Provider B Provider 23 ESB Reference Architecture and Product Selection Guidelines © 2008 IBM Corporation SOA Symposium ESB Patterns Federated ESB  One master ESB with several dependent ESBs  Service requestors and providers connect to master ESB or one of the dependent ESBs  Used to federate a set of autonomous organizations Requester ES Requester B Provider ESB Provider Provider ESB Provider Provider ESB Provider 24 ESB Reference Architecture and Product Selection Guidelines © 2008 IBM Corporation 12
  • 13. SOA Symposium ESB Federation 25 ESB Reference Architecture and Product Selection Guidelines © 2008 IBM Corporation SOA Symposium Observation  Federation is really about service visibility – One domain – Several domains – All domains  A service registry defines service visibility “policy” – In the desired domain(s) – With the desired monitoring and management – With the desired security  A service bus simply enforces “policy”  We use this to analyze approaches to federation 26 ESB Reference Architecture and Product Selection Guidelines © 2008 IBM Corporation 13
  • 14. SOA Symposium Some analysis – Service Virtualization 1 3 Service requester … implemented invokes a service… by Service Bus mediation… 2 4 … which is a … delegating to the Virtual service … Actual service Pattern: Service Virtualization 27 ESB Reference Architecture and Product Selection Guidelines © 2008 IBM Corporation SOA Symposium Service Virtualization with Service Registry Virtual Service Actual Service Implemented by the virtual service Service Bus delegates to A‟ A Advertise 3.a Use Registry content to virtual services 0 implement smart mediations Metadata about services A‟ A in Registry for use by Service Bus Services in Registry advertised for use by Pattern: Dynamic Requesters Service Virtualization 28 ESB Reference Architecture and Product Selection Guidelines © 2008 IBM Corporation 14
  • 15. SOA Symposium Federated Service Virtualization Virtual Virtual Service Actual Service Service the virtual service the virtual service delegates to delegates to A‟‟ A‟ A A‟‟ A‟ A‟ A Pattern: Recursive Service Virtualization 29 ESB Reference Architecture and Product Selection Guidelines © 2008 IBM Corporation SOA Symposium Federated ESB interaction patterns Domain D Remoted ESB Y virtualization C C‟ D‟ Remote D virtualization C B B‟ Recursive B‟‟ B virtualization A A A‟ Local Domain virtualization ESB X C D‟ A‟ B D A B‟‟ Patterns: B‟ C‟ Private in X “Federated” Private in Y Public in Y Public in X 30 ESB Reference Architecture and Product Selection Guidelines © 2008 IBM Corporation 15
  • 16. SOA Symposium Federated ESB interaction patterns  In reactive situations, with “black box” service buses, addition of a „backbone‟ may be necessary “Introspection” of existing service registries required to populate „global‟ service registry 31 ESB Reference Architecture and Product Selection Guidelines © 2008 IBM Corporation SOA Symposium Some analysis – Service Management Virtual B Service A Observes endpoints Uses Endpoint Offers Interaction 2 Status Information 1 Status Information A B Endpoint Status Service Monitor & Manager Service Registry Change & Configuration Metadata Management DB 32 Federation ESB Reference Architecture and Product Selection Guidelines © 2008 IBM Corporation 16
  • 17. SOA Symposium Some analysis – Service Security Virtual Virtual Service Actual Service Service the virtual service the virtual service delegates to delegates to A A‟‟ A‟ A Identity Identity Identity Mapping 33 ESB Reference Architecture and Product Selection Guidelines © 2008 IBM Corporation SOA Symposium Some analysis – Service Security  In reactive situations, with “black box” service buses, addition of a „backbone‟ may be necessary Identity Identity Identity Mapping 34 ESB Reference Architecture and Product Selection Guidelines © 2008 IBM Corporation 17
  • 18. SOA Symposium ESB Product Selection Criteria 35 ESB Reference Architecture and Product Selection Guidelines © 2008 IBM Corporation SOA Symposium Key Criteria for ESB selection  Communication Protocols & Interaction Patterns – Critical (e.g., MQ, SOAP/HTTP) – Accommodated – “Associated” standards (e.g., WS-Security) – APIs (e.g., JMS) – Adapters  Message Models – Meta-models (e.g., XML) – Content models (e.g., ACORD), including Weak-typing – “Associated standards” (e.g., SOAP headers) 36 ESB Reference Architecture and Product Selection Guidelines © 2008 IBM Corporation 18
  • 19. SOA Symposium Key Criteria for ESB selection (cont.)  Mediation Flows and Mediation Patterns – Conversion – Transformation engine(s) – Routing – Security and Management integration – Logging and auditing integration – Registry integration – Breadth of pre-built mediation primitives – Custom mediation capability and Programming model – Weakly-typed processing 37 ESB Reference Architecture and Product Selection Guidelines © 2008 IBM Corporation SOA Symposium Key Criteria for ESB selection (cont.)  Qualities of service – Heterogeneous transaction coordination – Reliable/assured delivery – Performance – Scalability – Reliability  Non-functional – Affinity to SOA environment (e.g., WebSphere Process Server) – Affinity to IT environment (e.g. J2EE application server) – Development tooling capabilities and affinity to current tools – Configuration and administration tooling capabilities – Existing and required skill set (e.g., J2EE skills) – Ease of integration with management (e.g., monitoring, security) environment – Product maturity and comfort level with leading edge products – Price and total cost of ownership 38 ESB Reference Architecture and Product Selection Guidelines © 2008 IBM Corporation 19
  • 20. SOA Symposium Sample ESB Scenarios 39 ESB Reference Architecture and Product Selection Guidelines © 2008 IBM Corporation SOA Symposium Case 1 – Connectivity between web service requester and an EIS system Tooling Domain of interest - Intranet SAP Adapter EIS Backend Web Services requester ESB Registry 40 ESB Reference Architecture and Product Selection Guidelines © 2008 IBM Corporation 20
  • 21. SOA Symposium Case 1 Description  Customer environment – This customer is leading adopter of technology. Comfortable with sophisticated solutions – WebSphere Application Server customer  Business Requirements – The customer wants to provide web service access to functionality in an Enterprise Information System such as SAP R/3, PeopleSoft, or Oracle Financials – Intranet environment doesn‟t require complex security considerations – The integration is based on message exchange/data replication scenarios - there is no business process or data synchronization between clients and EIS systems – Support moderate volume of requests  Technical Requirements – The targeted integration is one-to-one, i.e., one ESB virtual service maps to one EIS application, although multiple EISs can be exposed as web services at the same time – Data transformation should use XSLT; development tooling important – Log the messages as they flow through the hub – asynchronously to a file  Architecture Decisions – J2EE environment preferred – Use available adapter product to simplify development 41 ESB Reference Architecture and Product Selection Guidelines © 2008 IBM Corporation SOA Symposium Case 1 Analysis  Infrastructure Pattern – Service virtualization – Domain isolation unimportant  ESB Product selection – Transport Protocols – JCA adapter supported – SOAP/HTTP – Synchronous Request/response sufficient – Message models – XML metamodel desired – Content model supported – Mediation flows – XLST transformation and supporting tooling – QoS and Non-functional requirements – J2EE foundation (WebSphere Application Server) – XSLT transformation skills available – Adequate throughput and/or response time – Leading edge adopter 42 ESB Reference Architecture and Product Selection Guidelines © 2008 IBM Corporation 21
  • 22. SOA Symposium Case 2: Connectivity between heterogeneous requesters and providers (Multi-protocol Exchange) Tooling Domain of interest - Intranet Registry Portal SOAP/JMS SOAP/JMS J2EE provider SOAP/HTTP SOAP/HTTP .NET Client .NET provider XML/HTTP XML/HTTP Some Client ESB Some provider XML/MQ COBOL Copybook/MQ XML/MQ Client CICS Text/MQ Text/MQ Client 43 ESB Reference Architecture and Product Selection Guidelines © 2008 IBM Corporation SOA Symposium Case 2 Description  Customer environment – Customer is a leading adopter of technology. Comfortable with sophisticated solutions  Business Requirements – Any provider must be accessible via multiple heterogeneous requestors – Support moderate volume of requests – Intranet environment does not require complex security considerations – Global transactions across multiple heterogeneous transaction managers  Technical Requirements – ESB must support – Communication protocol conversion, but not adapters – Flexible data model conversion, with acceptable performance and adequate tooling – Enterprise class persistent messaging backbone  Architecture Decisions – Canonical data model(s) used in ESB – Consumers and providers must adapt to the service definition supported by the ESB 44 ESB Reference Architecture and Product Selection Guidelines © 2008 IBM Corporation 22
  • 23. SOA Symposium Case 2 Analysis  Infrastructure Pattern – Significant service virtualization  ESB Product selection – Transport Protocols – Multiple protocols – Synchronous and asynchronous Request/response – MQ provides enterprise class persistent messaging backbone – Message models – Multiple built-in message metamodels – Content models supported – Mediation patterns – Significant protocol conversion capability – Significant transformation capability with supporting tooling – Supports advanced correlation of asynchronous request/response – Extensive runtime configuration options – QoS and Non-functional requirements – Global transactions across multiple heterogeneous transaction managers – Mature product which supports throughput and/or response time – Sophisticated transformation skills available 45 ESB Reference Architecture and Product Selection Guidelines © 2008 IBM Corporation SOA Symposium Example of Federated ESB (1) Retail POS/Store Store Applications Point of Sale Terminal Lightweight commercial Point of Java-based MQ Sale ESB Terminal Headquarters MQ MQ Mainframe Full-featured DBMS Retail POS/Store ESB with Store Applications richer mediation & SOAP/ connectivity HTTP TP Point of MQ Monitor Sale SOAP/ Terminal HTTP MQ JMS Lightweight MQ commercial Enterprise J2EE Server Point of Java-based Applications Sale ESB Terminal 46 ESB Reference Architecture and Product Selection Guidelines © 2008 IBM Corporation 23
  • 24. SOA Symposium Example of Federated ESB (2) Enterprise Secure Zone ESB 1 Subscribers Publishers (distribute MQ MQ events) MQ Demilitarized Zone SOAP J2EE Partner SOA Appliance ESB 2 Web services SOAP/ HTTP SOAP/ HTTP (Dynamically Route and log Web services Web Web services) for CICS Application Registry Federated IM 47 ESB Reference Architecture and Product Selection Guidelines © 2008 IBM Corporation SOA Symposium Example of Federated ESB (3) External Services/Consumer Red – service requestors/providers s Blue – part of the ESB WAS Legacy Applicatio SOAP/HTTP/ Application n WS-Security BPEL Process FTP/Files Process Server Legacy BPEL Process .NET XML/MQ Application Application Process Server SOAP/ SCA JMS Binding Sockets MQ DataPower Departmental Departmental Device Adapter PM4Data Service Bus Service Bus Message Broker WebSphere ESB SOAP/HTTP MQ MQ MQ MQ Backbone Service Bus MQ and Message Broker MQ Partner Services Registry/Repository Gateway EDI / AS2 / SOAP/ SOAP/HTTP WAS XML/HTTP XML/MQ HTTP Applicatio Business Business n .NET Departmental Business Application Service Partner Application Partner Partners 48 ESB Reference Architecture and Product Selection Guidelines © 2008 IBM Corporation 24
  • 25. SOA Symposium Summary  ESB provides Service Virtualization  ESB also enables Aspect Oriented Connectivity – in support of an SOA Connectivity Entry Point  ESB is an architectural pattern – various types – federated ESBs become more wide-spread  We can identify a number of federated ESB patterns  The ESB ref arch provides the basis for product selection 49 ESB Reference Architecture and Product Selection Guidelines © 2008 IBM Corporation SOA Symposium Thai Traditional Chinese Russian Gracias Spanish Thank English You Merci French Obrigado Brazilian Portuguese Arabic Grazie Danke Italian German Simplified Chinese Japanese 50 50 ESB Reference Architecture and Product Selection Guidelines © 2008 IBM Corporation 25