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E01001703 Document Transcript

  • 1. Appreciative Enquiry Workshop (AEW) & Café Notes Woolwich Common Well London Lead Partner for Greenwich: UEL This document was produced by the Well London Community Engagement & Mapping Teams at The Institute of Health & Human Development, University of East London
  • 2. Contents Page Appreciative Enquiry Workshop Notes 3 Themed Summaries 9 Community Café Notes 13 Services and Amenities Mapping 25 Pen Profile 31 Well London Projects Overview 40 2
  • 3. GREENWICH AEW Notes GREENWICH AEW Summary 1. Narrative and short list of general principles to guide the delivery of any projects. Three Main Themes a) Social Cohesion: There was a strong emphasis on social cohesion. Breaking down the barriers between different Community Groups and getting a common community identity. To be achieved by Community activities, fun events, through common language and language support. Community Leadership also was an important element through training and accreditation. b) Young People and Intergenerational work: There was a strong feeling that there was a fear of young people and a growing gang culture. There needed to be more respect for different generations. Young people should respect older people and older people should not be intimidated by young people. There was also a strong feeling that there should be increased training and employment opportunities for young people. c) Pride of Place: If there was more pride in the physical environment then there would be more pride and it would be safer. 2. Are there any particular demographic target groups to whom the individual projects should be targeted? a) Project targeted at young people. b) Inter-generational and inter-cultural projects. 3. What leverage activities were identified? a) Enhanced knowledge of what was happening in the area and using these resources. How do people then get involved? b) There was an issue around language and language support. c) Also physical environments with social landlords improving stairwells and covered landings etc. d) Also Park Wardens, public loos, houses and roads. 3
  • 4. 4. What are the overall priorities from the AEW? a) Community Leadership and training. b) Community Networks and Social Cohesion. c) Young people d) Using what is already there and making sure everyone knows about it. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Notes from the AEW Main issues from postcards • Relaxation, rest, happy • Taking care of the environment • Reaching out • Involving young people, engaging them across the different project. • Employment opportunities. • Well maintained open spaces. • Community developments make sure its community led. • Arts and culture – access to the arts. • Lining up resources – so we are going in the same direction, and leave something solid behind. • Using healthy eating to tackle issues like life expectancy. • Safety is the cement that ties the community together. Create a safe place to live for everyone, children and adults. A secure environment. • People caring for each other. Care for the homeless. • Tackling gang violence. • Babies are getting a bad start in life, physically, in the environment, mentally, health wise etc. • Women’s health, using the network of women to get across cultures for leverage on environment where there is no cultural divide. • The power of sports. • Equity • Business – Resource. • Local economy. • Address the causes of keeping an eye to the effects. • To achieve a situation that changes not only the individual but the environment as well. • Values Working Well • Making sure everyone is on board, that it matters and adds value. • Shared values – bringing about and understanding them. • Parenting Skills – making sure that all partied are supported e.g. (support parents) help them and bring all parties together (parents and children) 4
  • 5. • Giving parents the confidence to act and get information ‘empowerment@ and taking the pressure off parents. • Education – support to permit people to gain the education, to pursue choices. Consider the support ……around individuals to improve access. • Open to all, across generations project opportunity to give time – must be fun • Building a rapport with those involved. Developing relationships beforehand. • Feedback, reception, ‘gee up’ having community leaders invested in creating an environment of mutual support, mutual benefit, mutual leadership etc. • (Community leaders may be able to support the parents?) • How to empower? Especially when funding runs out- need to focus on building relationships, sustainability and long term involvement from community. • Volunteering, formal and informal learning, underestimating the value of informal – how can people use both? Share that learning. • Feeling valued for your contribution – your work matters – touching on important needs allowing them to do the critical work. Finding the local resources (volunteers) and make sure they are employed correctly and maximised. • WL how to tap into community to help them share this live information and inform, teach, support others. • Influence and leverage to help reduce issues such as anti social behaviour. • Using established relationships to help to bring people in. • Not to limit other people’s aspirations – have faith in people (links in with volunteering). Challenging assumptions of what will and will not work. • WL’s enabling role - is this new – different? - Taking a risk. • Making people feel valued for their efforts. Dream stage What would your wish be? Prioritising: • ‘Community leadership’ – (identify them provide feedback and keeping things in check) • For community leaders to be at the heart of WL. (not from within the traditional hierarchy). • Cleaner environment (local/physical) litter fines in place. • Parental responsibility for bringing up their children. • Rebuilding those connections in society so we ‘can speak up’. Stand up for what is right. 5
  • 6. • Linking with the schools – some kind of civic responsibility, pride etc. • Manifested in this lack of confidence in parenting etc. • How people engage as citizens within their community. Link into this work already happening on civic pride. • Young people having a vision for the future (employment) • 3 years is good time span to work with young to ensure ripple effect. • Equal access to health and fill those aspects (broader) access through translation, gender appropriate, information re – healthy eating. • Green Environment – for relaxing and play. • Leisure activities, local shops to a higher standard being able to buy a decent healthy lunch. • Raising aspirations but also creating connections to employment, creating jobs. Visual mapping Visual Map 1 a) Intergenerational projects • Changing attitudes towards age and culture. • Activities together and the main themes were reaching out to young people • Joint work with Schools and Parents out reach which includes places of worship, Community Groups, Vocational Workshops for young people. b) Community Leadership • With such projects as Youth Voluntary Youth Achievement Awards. • Give confidence and support through training and accredition. c) Healthy Eating • Through GPs, Nutritionists. • Growing own food. • Gardening. d) Communal Spaces • Improve Safety. • Brightening stairwells. • Benches, Graffiti walls. 6
  • 7. • Artists/Environmentalists – could be brought in. • All this would improve safety. • Need to bring in support of Council and TRA’s as landlords. e) Gang Prevention • Mediation. • Mentoring. f) Parenting • Understanding between parents and children and using Sure Start Centres. Three Main Priorities 1) Young people 2) Community Leadership 3) Community Spaces. Visual Map 2 a) Community Cohesion • In creating a greater Sense of Community Cohesion, communities need to be connected – common language – SOL support. • Information needs to transfer easily. • All people and all communities need to be connected to achieve their potential. b) Health Trainers • Enhancing parent’s confidence and a youth version should be developed. c) Respect for Human Rights • Through better physical environment including Park Wardens, Public Loos. • People feel safer, feel proud, fewer knives, and is a good place to live. d) Fun • Focus on ways of making people happy or feel good, joint activities for all the community which are fun. e) Parenting & induction • Gap between native born and non-native communities. Parents have little insight into culture, they are bringing up their children in so giving parents an insight into that culture is important. Three Priorities 7
  • 8. • How do people find out what is happening and how to get involved? • Case by case trainer • Local Networks – so you are part of something bigger. Projects • Intergenerational project • Youth Volunteering • Healthy Eating • Communal Spaces • Youth Projects • Health trainer project and a young people’s version • Fun projects which bring people together See Themed Summaries on Page 9 8
  • 9. Themed Summaries This section summarises the collective information that emerged from the different sources – community cafes, mapping exercise, walk-abouts, local intelligence, pen portrait and youth consultations – according to WL themes. 1. Healthy Eating Café There are noticeably large numbers of take-away shops in and around the SOA. The residents felt that the ease of obtaining take-aways, microwaveable and processed foods was such that preparing and eating healthy foods required a lot of will and effort. Most parents admitted that they did not have enough information on healthy eating to enable them make healthy changes in their families’ diets. Also they wanted this information translated in the languages spoken in the area. Children could not be sufficiently persuaded to eat fruits and vegetables as most parents did not eat them themselves. It was agreed that growing their own food in nearby allotments would encourage healthy eating whilst achieving physical and mental wellbeing, as this would also bring parents and children together in a mutually enjoyed activity. Healthy eating clubs are also favoured because it would allow the residents to meet in a relaxed friendly environment, whilst exchanging recipes, tips and food from different cultures. The residents felt that the presence of a health professional like a dietician or nutritionist at these healthy eating clubs would be a good way of linking healthy eating and avoidance and management of chronic illnesses like diabetes and obesity. Mapping Most services are delivered through the Greenwich Food Initiative, a part of the Healthy Greenwich Network, which supports two key programmes (i) the Greenwich Community Food Coop - fruit and vegetable co-operatives, including mobile fresh fruit and vegetable stalls, and (ii) community cookery clubs targeted at Asian women. There are also local food growing schemes that are based in allotments and schools. 2. Physical Activities Café The main complaint was the absence of activities for children and young people in the area. There are also limited places for the residents to engage in physical activities. Vandalism, anti-social behaviour and dog-fouling made it impossible to make use of the local parks. Where available, gyms had limited number of available places, are too far or too expensive for the local residents. They wanted more 9
  • 10. facilities and activities for the children, especially after school and during school holidays, with the possibility of a role model to encourage them. The women wanted a culturally sensitive facility, with a crèche where they could go to for physical activity, and which was accessible to them more frequently (the present facility used is available to them only once a week and only for a few hours). The residents made the link between lack of physical activities and ill-health, which they pointed out, would cost the council more on the long run. They also wanted cycling to be encouraged. They would also like the GP exercise on referral scheme to be implemented properly to give people the chance to access facilities at reduced costs. Mapping Locally, there is a private gym (on Herbert Road). Nearest leisure centre a 20 minute walk. But there are ongoing discussions to open up local college facilities for community use. At the borough level the 4 key projects to improve physical activity are Active for Health, Healthwise, Charlton Athletic Race Equality and Greenwich Dance Agency (gDA). 3. Mental Wellbeing Café Ill-health, in addition to isolation was identified as major causes of depression among the residents. Also poor housing conditions, language barrier, immigration problems, unemployment, lack of social support and problems with the young people were also mentioned as issues affecting their mental wellbeing. They wanted more information for the youths regarding illicit drugs. There was an expressed need to engage children and youths in a non-patronising manner to reduce their aggression and anti-social behaviour. Most parents had lost control of their children, and the neighbourhood has become divided along racial and ethnic lines due to gang affiliations and their actions. The older people wanted a place they could meet and socialise, to reduce their feeling of being isolated and depressed. Lack of security and support also led to mental stress. The women would like more childminding places where they could leave their children for a few hours so they can relax a bit. CCTV cameras and more lighting would help the residents feel more secure, while reducing dog-fouling would help people feel better about their community. A community family centre would also help to foster a community spirit where people from different cultures and backgrounds can come together to have fun. People in the SOA mainly wanted to feel safe and secure in their neighbourhood. Mapping Some examples of mental health service provision were identified, principally SPLASH (Social Prescribing, Learning and Self Help) - a web-based service which promotes access to advice and support on healthy living and self-help with a focus on mental well-being; and the MH Promotion Team working with the libraries in each of the NR areas to establish dedicated self help sections.. 10
  • 11. 4. Open Spaces Café The residents identified the neighbouring parks and allotments. However they cited problems like dog-fouling, distance, inadequate play area for little children, vandalism and drug dealings as some of the things that marred the open spaces. The older people wanted seats and benches along the road so they could seat for a bit and relax during their walks. There are lots of fly-tipping and dog fouling, and rodents were environmental problems. Some of the residents wanted more trees grown in the area and residents encouraged to grow and maintain their hedges. Other residents felt that the trees were not well maintained and sometimes blocked important signs. Gardening was recognised as an important way to keeping physically and mentally healthy. A gardening (flowerbed) competition was suggested. Generally, they wanted a cleaner, better maintained neighbourhood where they would feel safe. Mapping There are 3 open spaces within the SOA; two others were discontinued for health and safety reasons. Some of the sites are unsafe and in need of upgrading 5. Arts and Culture Café They were not particularly clear what this involved but they want a mixing of cultures, physically and virtually. They want a meeting place for all age-groups and ethnicities, vocational centres for young people and clubs for over 50s. A community Happiness Project and celebration of different cultural festivals were also suggested. Mapping The SOA is covered by a mobile library service and ACE London’s database indicates 116 arts organisations in both Woolwich Common (intervention site, SE18) and Woolwich Riverside (comparison site); 21 of them fall within the SE18 postcode and their activities cover mainly dance and theatre. 11
  • 12. 6. Cross-Linking Themes Communication proved to be a big issue with the residents. People want more information on what is happening and what is available in the area, and they want this translated into the languages spoken in the area to ensure engagement of every group. They would more cafes like the Well London community cafe; however they hoped that they would not only be consulted this time (as they had been consulted several times in the past on various issues with nothing positive coming out of the consultations) but that they would see some action. They residents want vocational centres for carpentry, auto mechanics, cookery, plumbing, pest control, gardening and electrical, for the young people especially, as this might lead to a social enterprise if those trained could carry out repairs and maintenance in the council houses which have been neglected. They want community allotments where they could grow food with their families. This would encourage physical activity, mental wellbeing through spending quality constructive time with the family and the pride from growing own food, as well as making children know where their food comes from. Safety and an accessible community centre also topped the agenda. 7. Other Key Issues Many key issues outside the realms of the Well London themes were also raised. These range from personal health issues like back pain and migraine, attitude of doctors, to wider community issues like dog-fouling, pests, transport (buses and bus stops), crime and vandalism, anti-social behaviour, lack of an accessible well maintained community centre, poor housing and poor policing. Security and gang- related issues came up again. These issues, though outside of the remit of the Well London programme are obviously issues that are clearly very important to the residents and which may affect their response and attitude to any intervention introduced in their neighbourhood. There is a general feeling that the SOA and other neighbouring SOAs are being neglected in favour of those that will host the 2012 London Olympics. Also, being used as temporary accommodation, it is home to a transient population that would be hard to engage, risking the sustainability of projects and interventions introduced to the area. 12
  • 13. Community Café Notes 13
  • 14. 1. Healthy Eating There are noticeably large numbers of take-away shops in and around the SOA. The residents felt that the ease of obtaining take-aways, microwaveable and processed foods was such that preparing and eating healthy foods required a lot of will and effort. Most parents admitted that they did not have enough information on healthy eating to enable them make healthy changes in their families’ diets. Also they wanted this information translated in the languages spoken in the area. Children could not be sufficiently persuaded to eat fruits and vegetables as most parents did not eat them themselves. It was agreed that growing their own food in nearby allotments would encourage healthy eating whilst achieving physical and mental wellbeing, as this would also bring parents and children together in a mutually enjoyed activity. Healthy eating clubs are also favoured because it would allow the residents to meet in a relaxed friendly environment, whilst exchanging recipes, tips and food from different cultures. The residents felt that the presence of a health professional like a dietician or nutritionist at these healthy eating clubs would be a good way of linking healthy eating and avoidance and management of chronic illnesses like diabetes and obesity. 1.1 Children and Youths 1.1.1 Schools are pushing for healthy foods but parents cannot afford them. 1.1.2 More information on healthy foods. 1.1.3 Most children do not like vegetables. How can they be encouraged? 1.1.4 Most parents do not like or eat vegetables, and so do not encourage their children. 1.1.5 Encourage children to be involved in the cooking of healthy foods. 1.1.6 Affordable or free healthy eating clubs. 1.1.7 Open spaces for growing organic food. Plumstead School has allotments. 1.2 Elderly People 1.3 Women 1.3.1 No information on healthy food and healthy cooking. 1.3.2 Healthy foods (fruits and vegetables) are expensive. 1.3.3 Fast food and microwaveable foods are more readily available. 1.3.4 I need someone to let me know how I can cook Somali food in a healthy way. 14
  • 15. 1.3.5 Cannot afford organic and healthy food. Subsidise organic fruits and vegetables. 1.3.6 More information on healthy cultural foods. 1.3.7 If you’re not healthy through eating good food it means that you can’t do the other things that could make you feel better – like exercise. 1.3.8 Local supermarket is expensive, so they go to Woolwich, bigger ASDA store and the markets. 1.4 All 1.4.1 Community allotments to grow own food. 1.4.2 Supermarkets sell more processed and microwaveable foods than fresh foods. 1.4.3 How can parents be helped to understand the benefits of healthy eating? 1.4.4 Fish and Chips/Chicken and Chips shops should be encouraged to add vegetables and fruits to their menus. 1.4.5 It would be good if a nutritionist could come in and give eating advice in a cafe environment like this. 1.4.6 We don’t think healthy eating is as important as the other ones since it is kind of an individual choice. You choose what to eat at home and it depends on what you eat in your culture. 1.4.7 It would be nice to have somewhere to meet to exchange recipes and talk about healthy food. 1.4.8 Maybe we can have a mailing list to send out recipes to people who are interested. 1.4.9 We need information especially regarding food, diet and common illnesses like diabetes. I have a father who is diabetic and it is always difficult to think about what to cook. 1.4.10 If we could meet a nutritionist and discuss how to get 5-a-day. It would be good. In our community we never eat 5-a-day. More information would be good. 1.4.11 Somali vegetarian diet very expensive. 1.4.12 Healthy eating clubs 1.4.13 Too many take away shops 15
  • 16. 2. Physical Activities The main complaint was the absence of activities for children and young people in the area. There are also limited places for the residents to engage in physical activities. Vandalism, anti-social behaviour and dog-fouling made it impossible to make use of the local parks. Where available, gyms had limited number of available places, are too far or too expensive for the local residents. They wanted more facilities and activities for the children, especially after school and during school holidays, with the possibility of a role model to encourage them. The women wanted a culturally sensitive facility, with a crèche where they could go to for physical activity, and which was accessible to them more frequently (the present facility used is available to them only once a week and only for a few hours). The residents made the link between lack of physical activities and ill-health, which they pointed out, would cost the council more on the long run. They also wanted cycling to be encouraged. They would also like the GP exercise on referral scheme to be implemented properly to give people the chance to access facilities at reduced costs. 2.1 Children and Youths 2.1.1 There are no children centres or nurseries. Where available, they are not affordable. 2.1.2 Facilities for toddlers, children and teenagers. 2.1.3 Affordable activities especially during school holidays. 2.1.4 Football, swimming, etc. 2.1.5 Community Role Models. 2.1.6 There are nearby facilities for swimming and karate classes, but this is time consuming. It is something to do in a spare hour that would really help. 2.1.7 Activities for dads to get involved with their children. Groups for fathers and their children would be good as many fathers have their children for part of the week. 2.1.8 Young girls gain weight rapidly due to lack of exercise and social interaction. 2.2 Elderly People 2.3 Women 2.3.1 There are no affordable women-only fitness classes. 16
  • 17. 2.3.2 Fitness classes should be during school hours because by evening everyone is tired and stressed, and it is not safe to go out at night because of gangs of young boys. 2.3.3 Culturally-sensitive physical activity centres for women, with crèche facilities. 2.3.4 Mothers with children need to go out more but there are no safe playgrounds nearby. You get scared off by teenagers. 2.3.5 There is one swimming session a week for women-only at the Shooters Hill pool. Would like more physical activities for women- only. 2.3.6 Exercise and massage. 2.4 All 2.4.1 Keep fit sessions in the local area. All leisure centres are too far. 2.4.2 Most groups available are not attended because of language barriers. Most people in community do not speak English; hence they stay at home and get depressed instead of expressing their feelings of the community. 2.4.3 Places are very limited at the Greenwich Leisure Centre. 2.4.4 Councils should provide more gyms because if you are not fit you get ill and this will cost the council more money. 2.4.5 Would like to do more cycling. A resident (Tigah Hewitt) has a program teaching cycling and bicycle maintenance. The scheme runs for young people where they pay £10 and are taught how to build their own bikes out of recycled spare parts from old ones. Would like to be supported to go on. 2.4.6 Would like to do some gardening. 2.4.7 GP referral to leisure services at Woolwich Waterfront Centre (exercise on prescription) was promised – a card entitling users to three months use of the facilities. This should be followed up with the PCT and the Council. 2.4.8 Some people play football on Winns and Plumstead Common at the weekends, however the council only lay down the white lines in the summer and they have to use their coats as goal posts. There are no organised matches. 3. Mental Wellbeing 17
  • 18. Ill-health, in addition to isolation was identified as major causes of depression among the residents. Also poor housing conditions, language barrier, immigration problems, unemployment, lack of social support and problems with the young people were also mentioned as issues affecting their mental wellbeing. They wanted more information for the youths regarding illicit drugs. There was an expressed need to engage children and youths in a non-patronising manner to reduce their aggression and anti-social behaviour. Most parents had lost control of their children, and the neighbourhood has become divided along racial and ethnic lines due to gang affiliations and their actions. The older people wanted a place they could meet and socialise, to reduce their feeling of being isolated and depressed. Lack of security and support also led to mental stress. The women would like more childminding places where they could leave their children for a few hours so they can relax a bit. CCTV cameras and more lighting would help the residents feel more secure, while reducing dog-fouling would help people feel better about their community. A community family centre would also help to foster a community spirit where people from different cultures and backgrounds can come together to have fun. People in the SOA mainly wanted to feel safe and secure in their neighbourhood. 3.1 Children and Youths 3.1.1 Government should provide more information on effects of illicit drugs. 3.1.2 Provide information centre for youths to tell them the effects of drugs on their bodies. 3.1.3 Most youths are on drugs now. 3.1.4 Government needs to intervene. 3.1.5 Nothing to do after school. 3.1.6 Reduce the aggression in youths. 3.1.7 Anti-social behaviour. 3.1.8 Guidance for young people, as parents do not have the rights to discipline children. 3.1.9 There is the Woolwich Youth Centre, but they don’t do enough to reach out and to engage the teenagers. 3.1.10 Young people are not motivated enough. 18
  • 19. 3.1.11 Vandalism and crime are on the increase. The youths are out of control and this cause fear because you cannot challenge their behaviour. 3.1.12 Lots of children and young people want to get involved with things – but it must be sold to them in a way that is not patronising and does not portray them as the problem. 3.2 Elderly People 3.2.1 Depression 3.2.2 Information on what groups are available in the area. 3.2.3 Areas where elders can communicate with other people. 3.2.4 Transport for older community members to attend community events. 3.2.5 Open a centre for elderly. 3.2.6 Intimidated by young people. 3.2.7 Well catered for health-wise. Good provision of services and support. 3.2.8 Need entry phones so that there is restricted entry into buildings. 3.2.9 Older people don’t have a place of gathering, like a social club, to escape family life. This leads to mental health problems and depression. 3.3 Women 3.3.1 Parents need to be accountable for their children’s behaviour, e.g. children disturbing neighbours. 3.3.2 Parents need to be taught parenting skills. 3.3.3 Because most parents depend on their children to relate to the outside world for them, like translating, the children hold their parents to ransom. 3.3.4 It would really help us if there was a service for childminding which would take on children when we need childminding. Many of the ones available now do not take up occasional childminding. It is not practical to give the children to friends and relatives because they have their own children too and might not be able to cope with so many children. 3.3.5 Child centres will only take children over four-year olds. 3.3.6 Eglinton Road Nursery is the best one. 19
  • 20. 3.3.7 Single parent support group needed. 3.3.8 Support offices are closing, people feel abandoned and depressed and the closest support service is at Charlton. 3.3.9 No security – you can’t leave pram outside for five minutes whilst taking other things upstairs. 3.4 All 3.4.1 Nothing for mothers and children to do after school. 3.4.2 Dog fouling everywhere. 3.4.3 International centres for people from different parts of the world for them to meet and discuss in various groups and to come together to exchange information and ideas. 3.4.4 CCTV for safety. 3.4.5 Family centre should be made available. 3.4.6 Parents do not have enough rights to discipline children and then the young people run riot, shooting others in the community. 3.4.7 Some parents look the other way and ignore their children’s criminal behaviours because they are bringing some money home. 3.4.8 Rampant violent deaths and fighting. 3.4.9 There should be an organisation that organise trips to other places, like to the beach and other parks. Once, Changes in Common organised it but could not continue due to funding issues. Trips like this will create mental wellbeing. 3.4.10 There should be cafes like this on a regular basis where you could exchange experiences, tips and recipes. 3.4.11 Immigration, housing and employment problems cause stress and depression. 3.4.12 Poor housing conditions leads to lack of pride in the area and respect for these areas which makes the problem carry on and get worse. 3.4.13 Feel unsafe at night with gangs hanging around and no CCTV. 3.4.14 Unemployment is high within the community. 3.4.15 Lots of single parent families. 20
  • 21. 4. Open Spaces The residents identified the neighbouring parks and allotments. However they cited problems like dog-fouling, distance, inadequate play area for little children, vandalism and drug dealings as some of the things that marred the open spaces. The older people wanted seats and benches along the road so they could seat for a bit and relax during their walks. There is a lot of fly-tipping, dog fouling and rodents were environmental problems . Some of the residents wanted more trees grown in the area and residents encouraged to grow and maintain their hedges. Other residents felt that the trees were not well maintained and sometimes blocked important signs. Gardening was recognised as an important way to keeping physically and mentally healthy. A gardening (flowerbed) competition was suggested. Generally, they wanted a cleaner, better maintained neighbourhood were they would feel safe. 4.1 Children and Youths 4.1.1 Community allotments for children and their parents. 4.1.2 Play areas and play parks. 4.1.3 Vandalism. 4.1.4 Riding bicycles on pavements, hitting balls on neighbours’ walls. 4.1.5 Selling weed and drugs openly and intimidating people to buy. 4.1.6 Lots of teenagers with dogs hanging around that you get worried for your children’s safety. 4.1.7 Open spaces for growing organic foods. Plumstead School has allotments. 4.1.8 Not enough space and facilities close by for younger children (swings, slides, hopscotch are what the children would like to see). 4.2 Elderly People 4.2.1 Old people cannot walk very long distances because of old age and different illnesses. They need seats and benches on the streets to sit and rest and to catch their breath. 4.3 Women 4.3.1 CCTV for safety. 4.4 All 21
  • 22. 4.4.1 Lots of people do not understand where vegetables come from. 4.4.2 Dog faeces everywhere. 4.4.3 Fly-tipping does not make the environment healthy. 4.4.4 Allotments should be away from pollution areas. 4.4.5 Greener areas. More trees. 4.4.6 Council to encourage people to grow hedges on their properties instead of building up walls. This will absorb the carbon dioxide and encourage birds to be around and for a fresh environment. 4.4.7 Educate people on proper disposal of waste. There are insects and rodents in the chute and bag blacks downstairs. 4.4.8 More looked-after open spaces. E.g. Oxleys, Plumstead Common. 4.4.9 The New Dawn Centre needs fixing up and is not safe. Mostly used and associated with only one ethnic group. 4.4.10 More lighting on the estates to make one feel safer. Also CCTVs might help to deter criminal behaviour. 4.4.11 More should be done to clean up the area. The physical appearance needs to be uplifted. 4.4.12 This place is overcrowded. 4.4.13 We have to go all the way to Plumstead Common. Too far to walk with children. 4.4.14 More trees on the streets. But these should be well maintained so that they do not obstruct important signs and notices. 4.4.15 There are allotments at Shrewsbury Park and the local school. This would be an opportunity for parents and children to get involved. 4.4.16 Even the seats on the streets have been removed due to rising levels of vandalism over the past five years. So you can’t sit outside or rest if you have a long walk. 5. Arts and Culture They were not particularly clear what this involved but they want a mixing of cultures, physically and virtually. They want a meeting place for all age- 22
  • 23. groups and ethnicities, vocational centres for young people and clubs for over 50s. A community Happiness Project and celebration of different cultural festivals were also suggested. 5.1 Children and Youths 5.1.1 Provide vocational centres for the 12-19 year olds. 5.1.2 Employment for gifted youths. 5.2 Elderly People 5.2.1 Older people have wanted to do some courses at the Greenwich College, but funding has been cut. 5.2.2 Clubs for over 50s. 5.3 Women 5.3.1 Cross cultural women’s groups. 5.4 All 5.4.1 One-stop shop for children and the whole family, whether it’s a website, newspaper or telephone service. 5.4.2 Not sure what this would look like but are interested in trying something out. 5.4.3 A place for cultures to mix. 5.4.4 Community Happiness Project. 5.4.5 Celebrate different cultural festivities and events, e.g. Chinese year of the pig. 5.4.6 Not much for adults to do in the evenings apart from visit each others houses or the pub. A community centre would be very valuable. Woolwich town centre where there are more things to do is perceived as unsafe and is a bus journey away. 5.4.7 There are loads of people trying but there is very little encouragement and support to get them through and make the efforts sustainable. 5.4.8 A resident does gardening around the area, the council does not mind, it makes the people proud. He would like to see things like “best flowerbed competition” to encourage people to garden more. He recognises the link between mental health, physical activities and arts. How can this be supported? 23
  • 24. 6. Cross-cutting Themes Communication proved to be a big issue with the residents. People want more information on what is happening and what is available in the area, and they want this translated into the languages spoken in the area to ensure engagement of every group. They would more cafes like the Well London community cafe; however they hoped that they would not only be consulted this time (as they had been consulted several times in the past on various issues with nothing positive coming out of the consultations) but that they would see some action. They residents want vocational centres for carpentry, auto mechanics, cookery, plumbing, pest control, gardening and electricals, for the young people especially, as this might lead to a social enterprise if those trained could carry out repairs and maintenance in the council houses which have been neglected. They want community allotments where they could grow food with their families. This would encourage physical activity, mental wellbeing through spending quality constructive time with the family and the pride from growing own food, as well as making children know where their food comes from. Safety and an accessible community centre also topped the agenda. 6.1 Communication issues 6.1.1 People are not aware of what’s happening and what’s available in the area. 6.1.2 Notices and Leaflets should be translated into languages spoken in the area – Chinese, Somali, Vietnamese and Hindu. 6.1.3 No information on healthy eating. 6.1.4 Would like more cafe events like this one to share ideas about healthy lifestyles, and to have some professionals there to help (like nutritionists). 6.1.5 Advertise where to go to have some fun. 6.1.6 Information on clubs, groups and leisure centres in the area. 6.1.7 People cannot speak English. 6.1.8 Language barrier must be broken. 6.1.9 Have translation surgeries, even if just once a week, so that people know what is happening and they will then attend. 24
  • 25. 6.1.10 Want to see the follow-up of this event. They feel they are often consulted but nothing happens People are losing trust. 6.2 Provide vocational centres for carpentry, auto mechanics, cookery and such for 12-19 year olds. 6.3 Train community members to do simple house maintenance as a sort of social enterprise, to deal with the housing problems that seem to have overwhelmed the council and housing associations. E.g. pest control, plumbing, painting, gardening, carpentry, heating. Especially train the youth since they are just hanging around. 6.4 Community role models for the young children. Should be cross-cultural. 6.5 Immigrants are not being helped. 6.6 Community allotments for children and their parents. 6.7 Lots of people do not know where vegetables come from. 6.8 No community centre. 6.9 CCTV for safety. This should stop the robberies, muggings and intimidation. CCTVs on estates like the Barnfield estate and in the schools. 6.10Cockroaches especially on Wrottesley Road. Vermin in the house is not hygienic or good for physical and mental health. 6.11The teenagers’ bad behaviour causes stress among parents especially if they are from different ethnic backgrounds. This divides the communities because parents blame each other and generalise about cultures. 6.12Bilingual health services very important. (Multi-lingual?). 6.13Barnfield Community Centre is closed up and unused. It could be used for various activities like youth clubs, gym, after school clubs, cookery classes etc. Brock Hill Centre is a good example of how to bring a community centre back into use. 6.14Church halls are too expensive to hire for groups. 6.15Intergenerational, intercultural community cohesion needed. 6.16No community groups in the area except the self-help group for people with long term ailments. 6.17We want to be empowered, you know like community empowerment programme, take back our community. 6.18More sustainable community projects are needed that people will enjoy with free activities such as cooking. (Good practice: Forum@Greenwich, Trafalgar Road. Offer private room hire, public cafe and office space to 25
  • 26. pay for free and subsidised community events and space. They run a scheme supporting start up groups with space. 7. Other Key Issues Many key issues outside the realms of the Well London themes were also raised. These range from personal health issues like back pain and migraine, attitude of doctors, to wider community issues like dog-fouling, pests, transport (buses and bus stops), crime and vandalism, anti-social behaviour, lack of an accessible well maintained community centre, poor housing and poor policing. Security and gang-related issues came up again. These issues, though outside of the remit of the Well London programme are obviously issues that are clearly very important to the residents and which may affect their response and attitude to any intervention introduced in their neighbourhood. There is a general feeling that the SOA and other neighbouring SOAs are being neglected in favour of those that will host the 2012 London Olympics. Also, being used as temporary accommodation, it is home to a transient population that would be hard to engage, risking the sustainability of projects and interventions introduced to the area. 7.1 Too many dogs around. 7.2 Not enough dog wardens around. Only one for the whole of Greenwich borough. 7.3 Back pain and migraines – would like to go to an osteopath but its not free. Costs a lot of money to buy pain killers and gets no help to buy medication. 7.4 Doctors just prescribe drugs without telling them why they need to take the drugs, the effects and side effects of these drugs. Doctors do not have enough time to explain and educate people about their conditions. 7.5 Immigrants are not being helped. Home Offices issues also. 7.6 Access to public transport. 7.7 Surgeries should give advice on healthy lifestyles. 7.8 Bus stops should have timetables so people know when next bus is arriving. 7.9 Bus shelters should accommodate people of different disabilities. And more seating spaces. 26
  • 27. 7.10Daughter who is seven months pregnant is living in a flat with no water and heating for two years. Council always promise they are coming to fix it but they never turn up. Estate will be pulled down at some point, but people need a healthy place to live before the estate is knocked down and repairs have to be done for those living in them. 7.11Crime and vandalism. 7.12Anti-social behaviour. 7.13No community centre. 7.14I don’t want Barnfield estate to become a ‘third world country’ due to the fact that the council is using it for a temporary accommodation area. 7.15Educate people on how to avoid condensation which they take to be dampness. 7.16Need for more police presence. There is lack of policing. 7.17Police in the area treat Somali people badly – this causes stress. 7.18Somali youths have been criminalised and this affects the health and wellbeing of both adults and children. 7.19Immigration, housing and employment problems. 7.20Appointments are at hospitals that are far (Sidcup, Lewisham, King’s College) rather than the nearby Queen Elizabeth in Woolwich. 7.21Lights in the streets and estates. 7.22Shared communal spaces in the estates are not clean; this is unpleasant and gets people down. 7.23Information and notices pasted on the ills of dog fouling. 7.24Entry phones needed for buildings. 7.25There are tramps and drug dealers on the stairs. 7.26Need for pest control for mice, rats and cockroaches. 7.27There is only one dog warden and one and a half school wardens for Greenwich. This is not sufficient. 7.28All the money is pumped into areas for the Olympics and we are neglected. 7.29Asthmatic children due to the poor housing conditions. 27
  • 28. 7.30Dirty stairwells and other communal areas (one of the women cleans the stairwells herself, but is worried that if someone slipped on a wet surface she would be liable). 7.31The Fusion club in Woolwich ahs caused a lot of problems and increased the fear of crime in the area. 7.32More police needed in the area. The Plastic Policemen (Community Police) are useless because people know that they have no power and so are not scared of them. 7.33Gang and race wars between Somali, African and Jamaican gangs. 7.34Muggings carried out by boys and girls as young as 10 years old. 7.35Adults are scared to talk to young people causing trouble because they could be attacked or arrested for child abuse. 7.36Gang and race wars between Somali, African and Jamaican gangs. 7.37Muggings carried out by boys and girls as young as 10 years old. 7.38Adults are scared to talk to young people causing trouble because they could be attacked or arrested for child abuse. 7.39Local police don’t even know the area. You can’t ask them for directions or the time anymore. 7.40The 386 bus is useless, infrequent and unreliable. You better not be waiting for it if you have an important appointment! 7.41Buses used for the route are small and inadequate. Quotes “Taking part and taking action is what’s going to make the difference” “We’re people – not illnesses and problems” “Being happy and smiling is half of it” Conclusion There is a desire for the whole community initiatives where people; young and old, and from different places and backgrounds could meet and get to know each other. However, they felt that due to the high turnover of residents, it would be really difficult to sustain the momentum of community initiatives when the neighbourhood changes every three to four years. How do you build a sense of community in a transient population? It was also suggested that community facilities like the community centres should be run on a business or social enterprise model and pay for themselves in the longer term. Services and Amenities Mapping 28
  • 29. Healthier Communities Strategy aimed at outlining health and to promote healthy lifestyles ways in which the council can promote healthy living in the A diverse set of projects have been submitted to the Neighbourhood Renewal borough over the ensuing two years. The central goal is to Unit including: mainstream efforts to improve  Queen Elizabeth Alcohol Project health across the Council so  Risk Factors Prevalence Survey that the Council itself  Kick the Habit! becomes an agent of health  50+ Healthy Living improvement. Other key activities by CiC include:  Proposed development of Community Anchor to support and develop network of local community and voluntary groups as part of succession strategy  Creation of a neighbourhood service interface that provides access to services and advocacy and support for local residents. This is a popular service that last year received 9,000 enquiries and 35,000 visits, many from residents of Barnfield 29
  • 30. Pen Profile Greenwich Intervention Site Woolwich Common E01001703 Consisting of a population of 1569 people, the residents of this LSOA in Woolwich Common ward are evenly split between genders (746 males and 823 females). The intervention site has a score of 58.22 on the index of multiple deprivation placing the area in the top 5% of London SOAs. The community comprises a combination of multiethnic groups inhabiting public housing. 68% of the population live in local authority rented housing putting them in the top 5% of all London LSOAs whereas only 9.5% of residents are buying their homes with a mortgage placing them in the bottom 4% of London LSOAs. At census of the residents, 45.92% were white (bottom 20% for London), 25.75% were Black African and 4.55 were Chinese. The majority of the community were of working age (62.4%) and a high percentage (27%) were under 16 which puts this among the top 5% in London2. Similarly only 10% of the population were between 45 and 59 which puts this area in the lowest 4% in London. Information provided by local statutory agencies suggest that as many as 30.2% are born outside of the UK. Barnfield in particular acts as a gateway for new communities from Africa (East and West), South Asia and South East Asia in particular. Increasingly there is migration from Eastern Europe, originally males the trend towards family migration seems to be increasing. The population is also skewed in terms of the age breakdown, the area characterised by young families. 30
  • 31. Fig 1. SOA E01001703 Location and Environment SOA E01001703 covers an area that has three parts, namely the Barnfield Estate (or part thereof); part of the Herbert Road Shopping Area; and Long Walk Estate The Barnfield Estate, which is likely to be the focus of the programme, is recognised as an area of need. The estate experiences high levels of turnover and transfer requests and has a reputation that extends over decades. In recent years there has been some improvement in crime and environment but many issues remain. There are also recognised problems with the design of the estate and the units contributing to the overall wellbeing of residents, but much of this requires structural change to be overcome. Located in the North-East of Greenwich, only 4.57% of Woolwich Common residents own their homes outright placing them in the bottom 5% for London. Similarly, only 9.28% of community members possess mortgages whilst 68.48% rent their accommodation from the Local Authority (top 3% for London). More than half of Woolwich Common inhabitants live above ground floor level in flats1 and a high proportion (34.6%) of these are subject to overcrowding (top 6% for London). Although average household size, at 2.17 persons, is comparatively low the number of rooms per household is even lower. Residents of the area also are twice as likely as the national average to see poor housing condition as a problem in their area1 The Barnfield Estate is bordered on one side by the Herbert Road Shopping Area. Totalling around 60 businesses it provides a mixed offer of convenience and business to business. The physical environment has improved significantly of late matched by new private investment in the parade, and there are little or no vacancies at time of writing, though a number of businesses remain marginal. Using the evidence of Experian Mosaic data suggests comparatively low levels of social capital with residents 35% less likely than the general population to believe that their neighbours engage in reciprocal help and 30% more likely to think that their neighbours ‘go their own way’. Overall, residents’ appraisals of their area are more negative than the national average. For example, the community are 30% less likely to state that their area is a good place to live, 130 % more likely to state that it is an 31
  • 32. average place to live, and 150% more likely to report that it is a bad place to live. 1 Of the markers identified, residents are nearly 140% more likely to state inadequacies in their surroundings and report noisy neighbours. Most perceptions of the neighbourhood show it to be of poor quality with problems such as teenagers ‘hanging out’ rubbish and vandalism and graffiti being rated at 41%, 32% and 61% higher than the national average, respectively1. Racism is perceived as a problem at a rate 123% higher than those observed in the general population. Health Status The residents of Woolwich Common feature in the top 2% of London SOAs for ‘years of potential life lost’ per 1000 persons, 109 are lost per thousand persons. The proportion of the population suffering from a limiting life long illness is 16.37% placing it firmly within the top 40% for London SOAs. Moreover, data extracted exclusively from the working age group shows that 17.5% of this demographic have a limiting lifelong illness; this places them in the top 10% for London SOAs7. The Mosaic groups identified with this area also have a rate of teenage pregnancies exceeding national average statistics by 45%. At ward level those in Woolwich Common have an average life expectancy at birth of 77.2 years.3 The data at middle super output area (MSOA) level indicate high levels of deaths and hospitalisation for diseases associated with unhealthy lifestyle. Rates of death from myocardial infarction are 17th highest in London and stroke 65th highest. Furthermore, based on the MSOA level data the number of related hospital admissions ranks 44th for myocardial infraction and 18th for strokes. This may be in part explained by the comparatively high prevalence’s of smoking (top 5% of London wards) and obesity (top 25% of London wards)6. Binge drinking statistics are more encouraging with the percentage (13.1%) falling just shy of the national mean (14.8%)6 However, the Mosaic types associated with this area have drug and alcohol related hospital admissions 50% higher than the national average, suggesting that although binge drinking may be less likely to occur, when it does, it is liable to be chronic or acute. It has been identified that the demographics and need is placing a strain on local health services. The number of front line healthcare practitioners and in particular GPs and Nurses is lower than that recommended for disadvantaged areas and recruitment and training as well as premises issues have been identified as restrictive factors for service expansions or developments. It has also been identified that there are significant gaps between health needs and health demands, indicating that there is significant work to be done around patient education and prevention. Furthermore, lacks of service provision are causing accessibility problems and preventing continuity in patient care and patient centred approach. In terms of primary care this is particularly true for mental health, substance misuse and sexual health services. Mental Health Woolwich Common has a low score on the index of mental health indicating lower than national average of mood or anxiety disorders or depression (m = -0.45)7. However local accounts contradict this and it is believed that the neighbourhood has high levels of mental health issues with depression, stress and panic attacks being the most common symptoms. Health professional are observing an increasing rate of young people suffering from depression including young mothers with post-natal depression. However other evidence is less positive with 7% of residents claiming incapacity benefit or severe disablement allowance for reasons of mental health 32
  • 33. which ranks in the top 2%. These conflicting findings suggest that residents are not seeking/receiving support (e.g. GP) during the early stages of mental illness suggesting that they are more likely to progress to crisis point necessitating hospital admission and incapacity benefit. Hospital data shows that 50% of episodes are related to substance misuse. Fear of criminal and abusive activity in the community may be one contributing factor in the onset of mental health problems. For example, data indicates that compared to the general population, residents are 28% more likely to worry about muggings, 10% more likely to worry about burglary, 47% more likely to worry about rape, 109% more fearful of insults and 28% more fearful of attacks from strangers. In addition, concerns over racial attacks were 128% more prevalent than the national average. 1 Diet Overall, Woolwich Common exhibits data that is in line with the national average for a good diet. However, bad diets are 30% more prevalent within this community compared to the general population. This is reflected by adults comparatively low levels of fruit & vegetable consumption (22.1%) placing them in the 15th percentile for London. However, children’s consumption of fruit and vegetables (45.9%) is synonymous to the national average (48.4%) eliciting less cause for concern.6 Healthy and fresh food is available in some of the Shops but the area is characterised by a number of fast food and similar establishments. There is also a range of Shops specialising is produce targeted at particular communities, for instance Halal butchers, African stores and shops and more recently a Shop targeting the Vietnamese community. The nearest food co-operative (though not strictly recognised as such) is on the Woolwich Common Estate, a 10-15 minute walk and very local in its catchment. Exercise Indicators of physical activity suggest that the residents of Woolwich Common are less physically active than the average member of the general population. For example, gym membership and marathon participation fall substantially below the national average (40% and 95%, respectively). Furthermore, the prevalence of various recreational activities undertaken falls below national average expectations; football nearly is nearly 10% less prevalent, cycling nearly 40%, walking and hiking 45% and visits to the theatre or arts 17% less likely to occur. However the levels of voluntary and charity work undertaken are more encouraging lying 3% above the national average1. Wider Determinants Benefit dependency London estimates of several sources of benefit suggest that residents of Woolwich Common have a very high level of dependency. For example, 8% of residents claim disability allowance ranking them in the top 16% for London whilst 13% claim incapacity benefit ranking them in the top 3%. Moreover, claims for income support (22%) and job seekers allowance (9%) are in the top 1% for London. The accumulation of this data suggests that the area’s residents are highly dependent on external sources of financial support. 4 Education The high proportion of people in Woolwich Common possessing no formal qualifications (34.02%) places this SOA in the top 16% for London. Data concerning 33
  • 34. the attainment of further qualifications reveals that 13.42% of residents have attained level 1 (bottom 47.86%), 19.16% (bottom 32.07%) have attained level 2, 7.68% (bottom 25%) level 3 and 20.08% (bottom 30%) have reached a level 4 qualification.2 Although not diabolical, these statistics nevertheless raise some cause for concern. Crime A pervasive neighbourly problem in the Woolwich Common community is ‘burnt out cars’ occurring 109% more than the national average. The prevalence of drug dealing and usage is also comparatively high, ranking 61% over the national average1. These high rates of criminal activity are in line with the above average level of worry reported regarding antisocial behaviour in the community. Social Capital Much work has been done to stimulate social networks in the area, but this was starting from a low base and much work remains. Changes in Common have initiated an Expert Patients Programme for the neighbourhood with a view to creating a new network of support and self-help groups, which are conspicuously lacking at present. Much work has also been undertaken to stimulate and support groups around geography, communities of interest and activities. Green Spaces The landscape of Greenwich borough includes large amounts of green open land covering a substantial 25% of the area. Moreover Greenwich features the longest river embankment of any London borough (eight miles). Woolwich Common ward has the open. The SOA neighbourhood has little in the way of large green space, but has plenty of such on its boundary, but the population does not generally access this. A study into play areas undertaken by Changes in Common is seeking to ensure a good provision of play facilities within the neighbourhood given a recognised under provision in recent years as areas were removed because of vandalism and/or health and safety issues. Employment activity. Median income in this LSOA is £17,2031 placing it among the lowest 2% in London. Of the Woolwich Common SOA residents, 59% are economically active placing them in the bottom 20% for London. Intuitively, observed unemployment is high (11%) ranking it number 15 for unemployment in London (top 1%)2. Traditionally the area’s industry has been characterised by the docks, energy production (gas), military production, and other manufacturing industries. As a result Greenwich borough has suffered from the national, long-term decline in the manufacturing industries, which led to the closure of many of the borough’s largest employers. An influx of public and private investment has helped to improve the infrastructure and current opportunities surrounding the Olympic Games may help locals to capture the benefits of regeneration of the Greenwich economy 5 Existing projects. At Borough level numerous projects and funding opportunities are available. There has been a substantial amount of Neighbourhood Renewal funding allocated to Greenwich Council’s health inequalities theme. In total £1.5m has been allocated to tackle issues concerning life expectancy and health inequalities. A diverse set of projects have been submitted to the Neighbourhood Renewal Unit including the Queen Elizabeth Alcohol Project, the Risk Factors Prevalence Survey, Kick the Habit!, and 50+ Healthy Living. Furthermore The Healthy Greenwich Network (HGN) 1 34
  • 35. uses a community development model to respond to inequalities in health and to promote healthy lifestyles. The Network’s food co-ops, cookery classes and physical activity sessions aim to respond to the needs of individual communities and are culturally sensitive to BME groups (e.g. Asian cookery classes). This SOA forms part of a priority neighbourhood, Woolwich Common, identified by Greenwich Council and its partners. The neighbourhood is served by Changes in Common, a resident-led partnership uniquely combining a Round 1 Neighbourhood Management Pathfinder and a Sure Start Local Programme. Based on Herbert Road the team already has close links to the local community and have had an active involvement in the area since 2002. Greenwich Council is currently developing a Healthier Communities Strategy aimed at outlining ways in which the council can promote healthy living in the borough over the ensuing two years. It made a range of recommendations, many of which are picked up in the healthier communities programme. The central ethos of the Healthier Communities programme is to mainstream efforts to improve health across the Council so that the Council itself becomes an agent of health improvement. At Woolwich common ward level there is a successful Sure Start project for mothers Despite its location the estate is isolated through a lack of permeability yet has little in the way of direct service provision on the estate. One long-standing exception is the Barnfield Project, which has provided support for families on the estate for many years. Currently undergoing a review in the light of Children’s Centre development, the facility still provides services including a crèche and a toy library. There is also work to bring a disused community facility on the Barnfield Estate back into use with a mixture of community and health facilities, but this is still at feasibility stage. It is hoped that this will increase health provision locally and providing a facility for community activity within the boundaries of the estate. The site is currently the subject of active interest from primary service providers. Notes 1. Experian Data 2. Census (2001) 3. LHO Data 4 Department of Work and Pensions. 5. Ground work profile 6. HSE (2000-2002) 7. Office of National Statistics 35
  • 36. LSOA Code E01001703 Ward Name Woolwich Common Demographic Education Economic Benefits Population (2004) 1569 Percent no qualifications 34.02 Males 746 Rank in London (out of 4765) 754 Economic Activity Rate 59% % claiming Disability Living Allowance 8% Working Age 1007 Percent level 1 quals 13.42 Rank in London (out of 4765) 4203 Rank in London (out of 4765) 751 % claiming incapacity benefit or severe % under 16 27% Rank in London (out of 4765) 2281 disablement allowance 13% Ranking in London %under 16 (of 4765) 231 Percent level 2 quals 19.16 Unemployment rate 11% Rank in London (out of 4765) 121 Percent White 45.92 Rank in London (out of 4765) 1528 Rank in London (out of 4765) 15 % claiming income support 22% Ranking in London (out of 4765) 4219 Percent level 3 quals 7.68 Rank in London (out of 4765) 26 Percent Black African 25.75 Rank in London (out of 4765) 3719 % claiming jobseekers allowance 9% Percent Chinese 4.55 Percent level 4 quals 20.08 Rank in London (out of 4765) 53 Rank in London (out of 4765) 3412 Health Health Health Mental Health Years of potential life lost ( per Cause of death -all: age Synthetic estimate of % smokers 35.6 1000) 109 standardised rate 998.3 Index of Mental Health (mean=0) -0.45 Percentile 95% Ranking in London (4765) 56 Ranking in London (4765) 1006 Ranking in London (4765) 2502 Cause of Death: MI age- Hospital admissions for mental health: age- Synthetic estimate of % binge drinkers 13.1 Percent with LLTI 16.37 standardised rate 24.5 standardised rate 400.1 Percentile 30% Ranking in London (4765) 1783 Ranking in London (959) 17 Ranking in London (959) 332 Cause of Death: Stroke age- % pop claiming Incapacity benefit or SDA Synthetic estimate of % obese 21.6 % working-age pop with LLTI 17.5 standardised rate 22.7 for MH 7% Percentile 77% Ranking in London (4765) 432 Ranking in London (959) 65 Ranking in London (4765) 87 Hospital Admissions Stroke age- SE %Adults 5+ fruits 22.1 standardised rate 286.7 Percentile 15% Ranking in London (959) 18 SE % Children 5+ fruits 45.9 Percentile 40% Level 1: 1+ 'O' level passes, 1+ CSE/GCSE any grades, NVQ level 1, Foundation GNVQ Level 2: 5+ 'O' level passes, 5+ CSEs(grade 1s), 5+ GCSEs (grades A-C), School Certificate, 1+ 'A' levels/AS levels, NVQ level 2, Intermediate GNVQ Level 3: 2+ 'A' levels, 4+ AS level, Higher School certificate, NVQ level 3, Advanced GNVQ Level 4: First degree, Higher Degree, NVQ levels 4 & 5, HNC, HND, Qualified teacher status, Qualified Medical Doctor, Qualified Dentist, Qualified Nurse, Midwife, health Visitor 36
  • 37. Housing Housing % own outright 4.57 Average household size 2.17 Ranking in London (4765) 4542 Ranking in London (4765) 3519 % own with mortgage 9.28 Rooms per household 3.71 Ranking in London (4765) 4599 Ranking in London (4765) 4495 % rent from LA 68.48 percent overcrowded 34.46 Ranking in London (4765) 101 Ranking in London (4765) 270 % rent private landlord 6.92 Without central heating 6.33 Ranking in London (4765) 3413 Ranking in London (4765) 2736 % rent from housing association 6.48 Without sole use of bath/shower/toilet 0.88 Ranking in London (4765) 2128 Ranking in London (4765) 1767 37
  • 38. Characteristics derived from Experian Profiles E01001703 Woolwich Common You can click on the hyperlink to see the Experian Profile Percentage of Percentage of population in Experian Archetype Poscodes postcodes E36: Metro Multiculture 100.0 100.0 In the table below the numbers are the percentage which the area is expected to be above or below the national average value Diet Neigbourhood problems bad diet 32 Noisy Neighbours 139 Teenagers hanging about 43 Physical Activity Rubbish 33 gym membership -38 Vandalism and graffiti 62 marathon participation -87 Racism 124 People using or dealing in drugs 61 Smoke and Drink Homes in bad condition 101 smoker 16 Burnt out cars 109 heavy smoker 44 Drink alcohol daily -36 Worries Heavy/medium beer drinking 32 Things stolen from car 32 Car stolen -11 Hospital Admissions Mugging 29 HES Total admissions 11 Burglary 11 HES Emergency -23 Rape 47 HES Alcohol and drug abuse 55 Attack from strangers 28 HES Mental Health 61 Insulted or pestered 109 Racial attack 128 Teenage pregnancy HES Teenage Pregnancies 45 Leisure Cycling -39 Social Capital Football -9 Neighbours help each other -35 Golf -53 Neighbours go own way 30 Hiking and walking -45 Good place to live -28 Ski-ing and snowboarding -29 Average place to live 139 Theatre and the arts -17 Bad place to live 149 Voluntary and charity work 3
  • 39. Well London Projects Overview The programme has a two-tier design. Of the fourteen projects, eight are 'theme-based' and promote mental well-being, healthy eating and open spaces and physical activity. Overarching these are six 'Heart of the Community' projects that will deliver capacity building and training, community consultation and engagement and promote access. Themed projects Healthy eating Buywell Will make it easier for people in our target communities to eat healthily because good quality, affordable, culturally appropriate and healthy food will be easier to buy. Responding to local needs identified in our ongoing assessment, Buywell will support organisations and individuals to: • Introduce healthier choices on the menus and ranges of local food to restaurants and/or shops • Increase the use of healthy, seasonal food in community meals, e.g. older people's lunch clubs • Set up new community-led "food co-ops" as social enterprises (where gaps exist), linked to local producers/markets • Expand the role of existing "food co-ops" so that they help people to access other food, mental health and physical activity-related services. Assist them to become more financially independent. 39
  • 40. Buywell links closely to Eatwell and with the Well London delivery team project. A number of Well London members will be trained to design, run and evaluate food access initiatives that meet the needs of local residents (see "Training Communities"). The Big Lottery Grant will pay for a Food Access Development Worker and a Retail Worker, the set up of 6 "food co-ops", and some staff time within a local partner in each community to help coordinate local delivery. Eatwell Will increase the take-up of healthy food and build a sense of community by a) Raising awareness of how to eat for good physical and mental health b) Making healthy eating more attractive and easier to do c) Celebrating food The grant will pay for: • New healthy "Cook and eat" clubs (where they do not already exist), with support initially but later led by trained members of the community. Sessions will be fun, safe, sociable and inclusive. • "Community feasts" to bring the community together in celebration, showcase healthy, seasonal and local foods, and celebrate cultural traditions represented in each area. Members of the Well London Delivery Team will support people to eat healthily by helping them to take up the activities above and existing support through schemes like "5 a day", with some of them receiving community food work training (see "Training Communities").As a result, people will increase in their confidence, awareness and ability to eat healthily, and in ways that contribute to wider environmental and social goals (such as reducing "food miles" and reducing social isolation). Where an individual has caring responsibilities, they will be able to feed their dependent(s) in a more healthy and sustainable fashion. Physical activity Activate London will increase physical activity (PA) levels through: • Increasing range of sports and active recreation activities available within, or accessible to, the community through signposting existing opportunities and delivering new activities; • Through the co-production approach, incentivise local people to be more physically active and become catalysts for change; • Promote Active Living for all; • Working with target groups to identify, develop and deliver activities that engage them. Activities will be developed and delivered locally by the Peer/Community Health Activators in partnership with residents, with specialist programmes bought in as appropriate. Individuals/groups will be supported to access existing and WL programmes and be more active every day. Activities may include: using the outdoors, including use of Wellbeing maps to access existing programmes or for walking; sports/active recreation, from football to yoga, seated classes for elders to street games and circus skills for children/young people. Through inter-generational and cross-cultural programmes (E.g. Active Community festivals), it will also increase social cohesion. Culture and creativity Be Creative, Be Well will use the arts and cultural activity to help engage communities and individuals in a process of change, to improve environments and provide accessible physical activities. 40
  • 41. 60 tailor-made projects designed in response to and led by the needs assessments of and consultations with communities will be delivered. A project manager will broker relationships between communities, other portfolio providers and professional arts organisations with extensive experience of community-led delivery. The programme will achieve: • Community networking/bonding through intergenerational/reminiscence projects, particularly those which promote greater community understanding • Improvement in the mental health of individuals by increasing social networks with uplifting, collaborative projects, building on local community traditions and cultures e.g choirs and sewing work • Support communities to develop their commissioning skills (e.g. contracting/ designing projects) to embed the arts as an effective, viable tool for engagement and regeneration long term. • Links for GPs to arts-based referral systems for mild to moderate mental health issues to lessen reliance on medication and reintroduce people to their communities • Increased physical activity through dance, especially for 11 - 19 years and over 60s. • Use of the arts to promote healthy eating and living e.g. creating materials that 'talk' to local people and interpret complex information. Improve employability and self confidence by signposting of young people to the Arts Award, an individually designed programme accredited at NVQ level 1-3 Open spaces Healthy Spaces Programmes build on the opportunities that open spaces offer for communities' health and wellbeing. Physical improvements that involve the local community in every step of the programmes from planning to implementation will be complemented by structured programmes of activities. The grant will pay for physical improvements, including:· improving existing spaces such as parks and communal spaces on social housing estates, e.g. through community arts approaches, designing community gardens , play areas and allotments · creating new and improving existing traffic-free routes between open spaces and residential areas, shops, schools etc. through landscaping, signage, sculpture trails, in conjunction with the Active Living Maps project. Revenue-based activities include: • therapeutic horticulture schemes, based on open recruitment and GP referral schemes • family learning schemes for parents and children, including outdoor programmes such as a health walks, growing fresh food and healthy eating • community gardening, also linking to the WL physical activity and food projects • open space maintenance and management plans that are linked to employment opportunities in CADBE. All activities will support local people in developing a sense of ownership for their spaces and foster community cohesion, thereby also tackling social isolation and related mental health problems. Mental health and well-being Changing Minds will recruit and train local people with direct experience of mental ill health to deliver mental health awareness training in SOA communities, empowering people to use their experience to help reduce the stigma and discrimination faced by many people with mental health problems and promote understanding of mental health and well-being. The project will: 41
  • 42. a) reduce stigma and discrimination faced by people with mental health problems b) increase understanding of mental health and well-being c) provide employment opportunities for people with mental health problems d) develop the capacity of local organisations to deliver their own tailored Changing Minds programmes Changing Minds aims to • train 3 local people from each SOA (60 in total) as mental health awareness (MHA) and anti-stigma trainers (6 month part-time course) • train 50 people from local community and statutory organisations as MHA trainers to work with direct-experience trainers (free 4 day course in return for 4 days training delivery each year) • produce Train-the-Trainers pack and guidance • support host organisations to deliver Train-the-Trainer packages. • co-ordinate learning network events every six months to bring trainers together for professional development, refresher training and problem-solving. (These learning networks will link with the Wellnet project.) DIY Happiness will deliver concrete, evidence-based messages and resources around what keeps people mentally healthy and well, and increase understanding of how people can protect themselves and their communities from the long-term effects of chronic stress. The project will use humour, creativity and evidence emerging from the field of positive psychology to provide practical advice and information that will increase people's ability to 'bounce back' from adversity, reduce both the physical and the psychological impact of stress, increase resilience, and build durable personal resources. Activities will include: 1. 'Can Money Buy Happiness?' Theatre-in-health-education play to provoke discussion about what we think makes us happy. Humour and 'hot-seating' approach act as catalysts, enabling audiences to relax and absorb the information conveyed in an entertaining and interactive way. 2. D.I.Y. Happiness Kits: Individual and group resource kits including tools, tips and techniques for well-being to reinforce key messages and improve understanding of determinants of mental well-being. 3. 'Dare to Dream' awards Individual and group awards to realise ideas that promote well-being and increase local happiness. Neighbourhood panels will decide awards and WL will work with recipients to provide support where needed. Mental Well-being Impact Assessment (MWIA) enables stakeholders to identify the potential impacts on mental well-being of their proposals/projects/programmes. It results in an action plan to maximise positive and minimise negative impacts and enables the creation of stakeholder measures of mental well-being. Over the first 18 months the project will support and train, 4-6 local people from each SOA to undertake 40 MWIAs. (50% of MWIAs will be on Well London projects and 50% on key local issues identified through local consultation). The project will take an "active learning" approach. Trainees will be supported by an experienced facilitator on their first MWIA before leading on a second MWIA. This will be underpinned by training in facilitation and mental well-being provided by the Training Communities project. A learning network, (linked to Wellnet), will bring together MWIA trainees from across SOA every six months. Each MWIA will be delivered in partnership with a local organisation identified through the Well London consultation and supported by an MWIA advisor to build local capacity. The project will: 42
  • 43. • Deliver a portfolio better tuned to deliver mental well-being across all activities; • Deliver a set of well-being indicators set by local stakeholders • Engage communities and increasing understanding around mental well-being • Develop local capacity to undertake MWIAs Heart of the Community projects CADBE (Community Engagement, Assessment, Design, Brokerage, Enterprise) has five roles within the Well Programme: • Leading the community engagement process, an ongoing process of engagement • Mapping existing service, initiative and project provision • Baselining the current state of the communities in relation to the Well London themes, both at the start and finish of the Well London programme, in order to evaluate Well London’s success • Delivering local brokerage and leverage of service providers, and developing social enterprises • Delivering a multimedia record of the journey. Well London Delivery Team This project aims to give people from our 20 SOAs the motivation, support, skills and confidence to increase opportunities for others in the community to improve their well-being. Before submitting the bid to BIG Lottery, our community engagement process highlighted the opportunity to train and support residents already active in their communities as volunteers to: a) “signpost” people to services and resources, for example counselling services or a local food co-op b) act as advocate for people as they engage with service providers c) increase the responsiveness of local services by providing a “feedback loop”, linking to the brokerage work in our CADBE project d) encourage people to take up healthier lifestyles We considered commissioning a local partner organisation to identify and support 5-10 volunteers as “Well London Delivery Team” members for 3 years of the project, with accredited training. As we have continued to discuss this within our communities, we have been made increasingly aware of the challenge foreseen in engaging and retaining the locally-based volunteers who will make up the proposed Delivery Teams. Timebanks for Wellbeing - We have therefore been exploring potential co-production models along the lines of Timebanks that would offer incentives for people to get (and stay) involved in the Delivery Teams, as well as other elements of Well London. This is potentially a very exciting development, which should really support the sustainability of programmes in each community for the longer term. Representatives of our co-hosts have been invited to attend a workshop in December to develop the project further and explore how this could be implemented for each community. WellNet This project will set up and support a well-being focused Learning Network for communities and professionals. Interventions to promote well-being across London will be more effective because new insights, tools and ways of working developed through Well London and other programmes in London will be 43
  • 44. shared between our 20 target communities, and with the Borough and PCTs where they are located, and with strategic agencies working pan London The grant will pay for: a) An Events series Pan London: 2 events per year for communities and professionals will offer a mix of high-level learning for senior policy makers and practitioners and more specific learning for those working at community level. Borough level: 3-4 sessions per year in our 20 target Boroughs will be held as part of an existing network. They will ensure that Well London activities in the SOA fit into local strategies and approaches developed in the SOA are replicated more widely. Existing sub-regional networks will also be used to share learning. b) Regular newsletters, and publications and a CD-Rom toolkit including inspiring case studies, top tips, tools and techniques) Fully interactive micro site for Wellnet members including online resources and e-discussion groups Wellnet will be operational from April 2008 for 3.5 years. Training Communities The Training Communities project will coordinate, develop and commission training for community members on behalf of all of the Well London projects The Training Communities project will fulfil the 'Dual Task' of delivering high quality projects that increase physical activity, healthy eating and mental wellbeing through investing in the capacity of the local community to develop and deliver these projects, a wish that was strongly expressed throughout the consultation process. Besides providing training and personal development resources that support and enable the other Well London projects, it will also be a key step in ensuring sustainability through creating pathways of training, employment and social enterprise for local service delivery, and hence close links with the learning and social enterprise projects. WL will provide access to bespoke or existing accredited and non-accredited programmes in the following areas: • Practical skills: E.g. fitness, exercise or sports leadership; food activators; horticulture and design; digital media skills. A skills audit of local organisations and residents will support these training programmes. • Process skills: including leadership training; community development processes; consultation facilitation; mental health impact assessment; negotiation and communication skills; evaluation methodologies. The Alliance recognises the specific issues underpinning training and employment in highly deprived communities and will ensure ongoing support and individually-focused learning are built in. Youth.comUnity Youth.comUnity seeks to ensure that the voices of children and young people are heard in all aspects of Well London's development and delivery and that they are involved in all projects as valued and equal members of the local community. It will work with children and young people to prepare them and support their involvement in the full range of Well London programmes, from the initial identification of need through the Community Needs Assessment through to development and delivery of the themed programmes (such as physical activity, open spaces etc.). It will work alongside local school councils and youth fora but also actively engage with young people not in employment, education or training, who may be on the street or involved in other provision. It will identify and support children and young people as peer mentors who will work to both engage others and act as advocates, if appropriate, through the Well London programmes. 44
  • 45. Wellbeing funding will employ two youth workers/informal educators who will work across the WL portfolio, along with a small programme budget for engagement activities. Active Living Map Using GIS technology web based maps will be developed for each SOA. Building on existing provision e.g. Local Authority' sources, London Green Map http://www.london21.org/map.php the map will draw together in a single resource a broad range of well being opportunities within easy access of each community. Information ranging from green spaces and parks, physical activities facilities and food co-ops, allotments, farmers markets etc, will be displayed in a simple accessible format. A paper map will be delivered to households in the target SOA via our well-being delivery team, as well as GPs, community centres, local delivery agents and local authorities. The web-based maps will be updated quarterly and the paper versions reprinted annually. The map will: • Increase local knowledge and awareness of resources and services • Increase opportunities for making healthy eating choices • Increase opportunities for and levels of physical activity • Create opportunities for employment or volunteering as walk leaders, brokered through CADBE. 45