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  • **Main Point: Economic forces and accelerating change are driving the need for flexibility and re-use. SOA makes this possible. Let’s talk about some of the reasons why businesses are taking steps to increase their flexibility and reuse through SOA. If you look at the graphic at the right, what you’ll see is what a sample business process (in this case, multi-channel retail) looked like in a traditional business compared to today’s world-class businesses. In the past, you saw companies with very linear business processes that were handled by an individual department within a company. As sophistication increased, you saw the same business processes being broken up and pieces of it being performed in different places. In this example, customers placed orders directly through the web, shared services in different parts of the company like merchandising or supply chain took over steps of the process; suppliers contributed vendor managed inventory; shipping was outsourced, and so on and so forth. This kind of dis-aggregation takes a lot of flexibility to establish and even more to change once it’s established. It’s important to remember that the business process in this example and very nearly every other business process in today’s companies are very dependent on the information technology (or IT) systems that support them. So what forces are driving the need for this kind of flexibility? Economics for one thing. As the marketplace globalizes, new markets, new workforces, and new competitors are making companies look for ways to adapt more quickly. We see the cycle time shrinking between changes in business processes. While you might have seen companies make significant changes yearly in the past, you’ll see the same level of change on a monthly or even weekly or daily basis. While business leaders were focused mostly on cost-containment in the past, we’re seeing that growth is back at the top of the today’s CEO’s agenda and that growth demands the flexibility to be more nimble than competitors. In a survey of more than 450 CEOs world – wide, revenue growth and increased responsiveness were seen as the most important needs in today’s economy. This isn’t to say that cost reduction has lost its importance. On the contrary, businesses are looking for ways to make better use of the investments that they already have. In another world-wide survey of CIO’s, reuse emerged as a top driving force. There’s more information available than ever before. Companies need a way to make sense of this information regardless of it’s location, format, or type. And finally SOA and the flexibility it brings is crucial for becoming what we at IBM call an On Demand Business. An On Demand Business is an enterprise whose business processes — integrated end-to-end across the company and with key partners, suppliers and customers — can respond with speed to any customer demand, market opportunity or external threat.
  • The IBM SOA Foundation is an integrated, open set of software, best practices and patterns that provides you with what you need to get you started with SOA. The SOA Foundation provides full support for the SOA lifecycle through an integrated set of tools and runtime components that allow you to leverage skills and investments across the common runtime, tooling, and management infrastructure. The components are modular allowing you to pick and choose the pieces you need to deliver an immediate impact while knowing that what you pick will work with pieces you add later on. In addition, the SOA Foundation is scaleable allowing you to start small and grow as fast as your business requires. The SOA Foundation provides extensive support for business and IT standards; facilitating greater interoperability & portability between applications. It can also help you to leverage SOA to extend the value of the applications and business processes that are running your business today.
  • Slide Objectives: The SOA Lifecycle is fundamentally important. It begins with an explicit indication of the importance of modeling business processes and then working those into deployable artifacts that are managed in a way that provides feedback for continuous improvement. Details: Our customers have told us that they take a lifecycle approach to SOA. They start in what we are calling the Model phase by gathering business requirements and designing and optimizing their desired business processes. Once they have optimized the business processes, they implement it by combining new and existing services to form composite applications. The assets are then deployed into a secure and integrated environment taking advantage of specialized services that provide support for integrating people, processes and information. Once deployed, customers manage and monitor the composite applications and underlying resources from both an IT and a business perspective. Information gathered during the Manage phase is used to gain real-time insight into business processes enabling better business decisions and feeding information back into the lifecycle for continuous process improvement. Underpinning all of these lifecycle stages is governance which provide guidance and oversight for the SOA project.
  • In spite of earlier efforts, soa good app servcies must be based on a model
  • **Main point: The SOA reference architecture is a vendor-neutral way of looking at and planning the set of services that go into building an SOA. The SOA reference architecture is a way of looking at the set of services that go into building an SOA. This architecture is not unique to IBM ; these are things that you need to consider when approaching SOA regardless of what products and services are used. These capabilities can be implemented on a build-as-you-go basis allowing capabilities and project level solutions to be easily added as new requirements are addressed over time. You can see that these services organized along the same lifecycle we’ve discussed. On the left in is Development Services which is model and assemble, in the middle are the elements of the deployment run-time environment you use and on the right is management. The backbone of the reference architecture is the enterprise service bus which facilitates communication between services. The reference architecture is a great tool for laying out roadmaps for pursuing SOA. Regardless of what kind of project you’re undertaking, it makes sense to lay it out on a reference architecture to see how the various services you’re designing are going to interact with each other Additional detail: The SOA Reference Architecture outlines the key capabilities that are required for comprehensive, enterprise wide SOA solutions. These capabilities can be implemented on a build-as-you-go basis allowing capabilities and project level solutions to be easily added as new requirements are addressed over time. Tools are an essential component of any comprehensive integration architecture. The SOA Architecture includes both Development Services which are used to implement custom artifacts that leverage the infrastructure capabilities, and Business Innovation & Optimization Services which are used to monitor and manage the runtime implementations at both the IT and business process levels. At the core of the SOA Reference Architecture is the Enterprise Service Bus . This delivers all of the inter-connectivity capabilities required to leverage the services implemented across the entire architecture. Transport services, event services, and mediation services are all provided through the ESB. The SOA Reference Architecture also contains a set of services that are oriented toward the integration of people, processes, and information: Interaction Services provide the capabilities required to deliver IT functions and data to end users, meeting the end-user's specific usage preferences. Process Services provide the control services required to manage the flow and interactions of multiple services in ways that implement business processes. Information Services provide the capabilities required to federate, replicate, and transform data sources that may be implemented in a variety of ways. Many of the services in an SOA are provided through existing applications; others are provided in newly implemented components; and others are provided through external connections to third party systems. Existing enterprise applications and enterprise data are accessible from the ESB through a set of Access Services that provide the bridging capabilities between legacy applications, pre-packaged applications, enterprise data stores and the ESB. The SOA Reference Architecture also contains a set of Partner Services that provide the document, protocol, and partner management capabilities required for business processes that involve inter-actions with outside partners and suppliers. Business Application Services provide runtime services required for new application components to be included in the integrated system. Underlying all these capabilities of the SOA Reference Architecture is a set of Infrastructure Services which are used to optimize throughput, availability and performance. IT Services Management Services include capabilities that relate to scale and performance, for example edge services, clustering services, and virtualization capabilities allow efficient use of computing resources based on load patterns. The SOA Reference Architecture is a complete and comprehensive architecture that covers all the integration needs of an enterprise. Its services are well integrated and are delivered in a modular way, allowing SOA implementations to start at a small project level. As each additional project is addressed, new functions can be easily added, incrementally enhancing the scope of integration across the enterprise. Background: The IBM SOA Foundation delivers the capabilities you need to adopt SOA through a comprehensive architecture. These capabilities can be implemented on a build-as-you-go basis, and yet, because of the architecture and its service orientation, capabilities and project level solutions can be easily added as new requirements are addressed over time. The SOA Reference Architecture shows the key capabilities that are required for comprehensive, enterprise wide SOA solutions. Development Services are an essential component of any comprehensive integration architecture. The SOA Architecture includes development tools, used to implement custom artifacts that leverage the infrastructure capabilities, and business performance management tools, used to monitor and manage the runtime implementations at both the IT and business process levels. Development tools allow people to efficiently complete specific tasks and create specific output based on their skills, their expertise, and their role within the enterprise. Business Analysts who analyze business process requirements need modeling tools that allow business processes to be charted and simulated. Software Architects need tool perspectives that allow them to model data, functional flows, system interactions, etc. Integration Specialists require capabilities that allow them to configure specific inter-connections in the integration solution. Programmers need tools that allow them to develop new business logic with little concern for the underlying platform. Yet, while it is important for each person to have a specific set of tool functions based on their role in the enterprise, the tooling environment must provide a framework that promotes joint development, asset management and deep collaboration among all these people. A common repository and functions common across all the developer perspectives (e.g. version control functions, project management functions, etc) are provided in the SOA Reference Architecture through a unified development platform. The Business Innovation & Optimization Services incorporate monitoring capabilities that aggregate operational and process metrics in order to efficiently manage systems and processes. Managing these systems requires a set of capabilities that span the needs of IT operations professionals and business analysts who manage the business operations of the enterprise. These capabilities are delivered through a set of comprehensive services that collect and present both IT and process-level data, allowing business dashboards, administrative dashboards, and other IT level displays to be used to manage system resources and business processes. Through these displays and services, it is possible for LOB and IT personnel to collaborate to determine, for example, what business process paths may not be performing at maximum efficiency, the impact of system problems on specific processes, or the relationship of system performance to business process performance. This collaboration allows IT personnel and assets to be tied more directly to the business success of the enterprise than they traditionally have been. One key feature of the SOA Reference Architecture is the linkage between the Development and the Business Innovation & Optimization Services. The ability to deliver runtime data and statistics into the development environment allows analyses to be completed that drive iterative process re-engineering through a continuous business process improvement cycle. At the core of the SOA Reference Architecture is the Enterprise Service Bus . This architectural construct delivers all the inter-connectivity capabilities required to leverage and use services implemented across the entire architecture. Transport services, event services, and mediation services are all provided through the ESB. Transport services provide the fundamental connection layer; event services allow the system to respond to specific stimuli that are part of a business process; and mediation services allow loose-coupling between interacting services in the system. The ESB is a key factor in enabling the service orientation of the SOA Reference Architecture to be leveraged in implementing service oriented solutions and can be implemented today to meet the quality of service requirements of any integration solution. The SOA Reference Architecture also contains a set of services that are oriented toward the integration of people, processes, and information. These services control the flow of interactions and data among people and automated application services in ways appropriate to the realization of a business process: - Interaction Services provide the capabilities required to deliver IT functions and data to end users, meeting the end-user's specific usage preferences. - Process Services provide the control services required to manage the flow and interactions of multiple services in ways that implement business processes. - Information Services provide the capabilities required to federate, replicate, and transform data sources that may be implemented in a variety of ways. Automated application services, implementations of business logic in automated systems, are a critical part of any integration architecture or solution. Many of these services are provided through existing applications; others are provided in newly implemented components; and others are provided through external connections to third party systems. Existing enterprise applications and enterprise data are accessible from the ESB through a set of access services. These Access Services provide the bridging capabilities between legacy applications, pre-packaged applications, enterprise data stores (including relational, hierarchical and nontraditional, unstructured sources such as XML and Text), etc and the ESB. Using a consistent approach, these access services expose the data and functions of the existing enterprise applications, allowing them to be fully re-used and incorporated into functional flows that represent business processes. Existing enterprise applications and data leverage the Business Application and Data Services of their operating environments such as CICS, IMS, DB2, etc. As these applications and data implementations evolve to become more flexible participants in business processes, enhanced capabilities of their underlying operating environments, for example support of emerging standards, can be fully utilized. The SOA Reference Architecture also contains a set of Business Application Services that provide runtime services required for new application components to be included in the integrated system. These application components provide new business logic required to adapt existing business processes to meet changing competitive and customer demands of the enterprise. Design and implementation of new business logic components for integration enables them to be fully re-useable, allowing them to participate in new and updated business processes over time. The Business Application Services include functions important to the traditional programmer for building maintainable, flexible, and re-useable business logic components. In many enterprise scenarios, business processes involve inter-actions with outside partners and suppliers. Integrating the systems of the partners and suppliers with those of the enterprise improves efficiency of the overall value chain. Partner Services provide the document, protocol, and partner management services required for efficient implementation of business-to-business processes and inter-actions. Underlying all these capabilities of the SOA Reference Architecture is a set of Infrastructure Services which provide security, directory, IT system management, and virtualization functions. The security and directory services include functions involving authentication and authorizations required for implementing, for example, single sign-on capabilities across a distributed and heterogeneous system. IT Services Management Services include functions that relate to scale and performance, for example edge services and clustering services, and the virtualization capabilities allow efficient use of computing resources based on load patterns, etc. The ability to leverage grids and grid computing are also included in infrastructural services. While many of the Infrastructure and IT Service Management services perform functions tied directly to hardware or system implementations, others provide functions that interact directly with integration services provided in other elements of the architecture through the ESB. These interactions typically involve services related to security, directory, and I/T operational systems management. The SOA Reference Architecture is a complete and comprehensive architecture that covers all the integration needs of an enterprise. Its services are well integrated and are delivered in a modular way, allowing SOA implementations to start at a small project level. As each additional project is addressed, new functions can be easily added, incrementally enhancing the scope of integration across the enterprise. In addition to supporting SOA strategies and solutions, the architecture itself is designed using principles of service orientation and function isolation.
  • In spite of earlier efforts, soa good app servcies must be based on a model
  • **Main point: The SOA reference architecture is a vendor-neutral way of looking at and planning the set of services that go into building an SOA. The SOA reference architecture is a way of looking at the set of services that go into building an SOA. This architecture is not unique to IBM ; these are things that you need to consider when approaching SOA regardless of what products and services are used. These capabilities can be implemented on a build-as-you-go basis allowing capabilities and project level solutions to be easily added as new requirements are addressed over time. You can see that these services organized along the same lifecycle we’ve discussed. On the left in is Development Services which is model and assemble, in the middle are the elements of the deployment run-time environment you use and on the right is management. The backbone of the reference architecture is the enterprise service bus which facilitates communication between services. The reference architecture is a great tool for laying out roadmaps for pursuing SOA. Regardless of what kind of project you’re undertaking, it makes sense to lay it out on a reference architecture to see how the various services you’re designing are going to interact with each other Additional detail: The SOA Reference Architecture outlines the key capabilities that are required for comprehensive, enterprise wide SOA solutions. These capabilities can be implemented on a build-as-you-go basis allowing capabilities and project level solutions to be easily added as new requirements are addressed over time. Tools are an essential component of any comprehensive integration architecture. The SOA Architecture includes both Development Services which are used to implement custom artifacts that leverage the infrastructure capabilities, and Business Innovation & Optimization Services which are used to monitor and manage the runtime implementations at both the IT and business process levels. At the core of the SOA Reference Architecture is the Enterprise Service Bus . This delivers all of the inter-connectivity capabilities required to leverage the services implemented across the entire architecture. Transport services, event services, and mediation services are all provided through the ESB. The SOA Reference Architecture also contains a set of services that are oriented toward the integration of people, processes, and information: Interaction Services provide the capabilities required to deliver IT functions and data to end users, meeting the end-user's specific usage preferences. Process Services provide the control services required to manage the flow and interactions of multiple services in ways that implement business processes. Information Services provide the capabilities required to federate, replicate, and transform data sources that may be implemented in a variety of ways. Many of the services in an SOA are provided through existing applications; others are provided in newly implemented components; and others are provided through external connections to third party systems. Existing enterprise applications and enterprise data are accessible from the ESB through a set of Access Services that provide the bridging capabilities between legacy applications, pre-packaged applications, enterprise data stores and the ESB. The SOA Reference Architecture also contains a set of Partner Services that provide the document, protocol, and partner management capabilities required for business processes that involve inter-actions with outside partners and suppliers. Business Application Services provide runtime services required for new application components to be included in the integrated system. Underlying all these capabilities of the SOA Reference Architecture is a set of Infrastructure Services which are used to optimize throughput, availability and performance. IT Services Management Services include capabilities that relate to scale and performance, for example edge services, clustering services, and virtualization capabilities allow efficient use of computing resources based on load patterns. The SOA Reference Architecture is a complete and comprehensive architecture that covers all the integration needs of an enterprise. Its services are well integrated and are delivered in a modular way, allowing SOA implementations to start at a small project level. As each additional project is addressed, new functions can be easily added, incrementally enhancing the scope of integration across the enterprise. Background: The IBM SOA Foundation delivers the capabilities you need to adopt SOA through a comprehensive architecture. These capabilities can be implemented on a build-as-you-go basis, and yet, because of the architecture and its service orientation, capabilities and project level solutions can be easily added as new requirements are addressed over time. The SOA Reference Architecture shows the key capabilities that are required for comprehensive, enterprise wide SOA solutions. Development Services are an essential component of any comprehensive integration architecture. The SOA Architecture includes development tools, used to implement custom artifacts that leverage the infrastructure capabilities, and business performance management tools, used to monitor and manage the runtime implementations at both the IT and business process levels. Development tools allow people to efficiently complete specific tasks and create specific output based on their skills, their expertise, and their role within the enterprise. Business Analysts who analyze business process requirements need modeling tools that allow business processes to be charted and simulated. Software Architects need tool perspectives that allow them to model data, functional flows, system interactions, etc. Integration Specialists require capabilities that allow them to configure specific inter-connections in the integration solution. Programmers need tools that allow them to develop new business logic with little concern for the underlying platform. Yet, while it is important for each person to have a specific set of tool functions based on their role in the enterprise, the tooling environment must provide a framework that promotes joint development, asset management and deep collaboration among all these people. A common repository and functions common across all the developer perspectives (e.g. version control functions, project management functions, etc) are provided in the SOA Reference Architecture through a unified development platform. The Business Innovation & Optimization Services incorporate monitoring capabilities that aggregate operational and process metrics in order to efficiently manage systems and processes. Managing these systems requires a set of capabilities that span the needs of IT operations professionals and business analysts who manage the business operations of the enterprise. These capabilities are delivered through a set of comprehensive services that collect and present both IT and process-level data, allowing business dashboards, administrative dashboards, and other IT level displays to be used to manage system resources and business processes. Through these displays and services, it is possible for LOB and IT personnel to collaborate to determine, for example, what business process paths may not be performing at maximum efficiency, the impact of system problems on specific processes, or the relationship of system performance to business process performance. This collaboration allows IT personnel and assets to be tied more directly to the business success of the enterprise than they traditionally have been. One key feature of the SOA Reference Architecture is the linkage between the Development and the Business Innovation & Optimization Services. The ability to deliver runtime data and statistics into the development environment allows analyses to be completed that drive iterative process re-engineering through a continuous business process improvement cycle. At the core of the SOA Reference Architecture is the Enterprise Service Bus . This architectural construct delivers all the inter-connectivity capabilities required to leverage and use services implemented across the entire architecture. Transport services, event services, and mediation services are all provided through the ESB. Transport services provide the fundamental connection layer; event services allow the system to respond to specific stimuli that are part of a business process; and mediation services allow loose-coupling between interacting services in the system. The ESB is a key factor in enabling the service orientation of the SOA Reference Architecture to be leveraged in implementing service oriented solutions and can be implemented today to meet the quality of service requirements of any integration solution. The SOA Reference Architecture also contains a set of services that are oriented toward the integration of people, processes, and information. These services control the flow of interactions and data among people and automated application services in ways appropriate to the realization of a business process: - Interaction Services provide the capabilities required to deliver IT functions and data to end users, meeting the end-user's specific usage preferences. - Process Services provide the control services required to manage the flow and interactions of multiple services in ways that implement business processes. - Information Services provide the capabilities required to federate, replicate, and transform data sources that may be implemented in a variety of ways. Automated application services, implementations of business logic in automated systems, are a critical part of any integration architecture or solution. Many of these services are provided through existing applications; others are provided in newly implemented components; and others are provided through external connections to third party systems. Existing enterprise applications and enterprise data are accessible from the ESB through a set of access services. These Access Services provide the bridging capabilities between legacy applications, pre-packaged applications, enterprise data stores (including relational, hierarchical and nontraditional, unstructured sources such as XML and Text), etc and the ESB. Using a consistent approach, these access services expose the data and functions of the existing enterprise applications, allowing them to be fully re-used and incorporated into functional flows that represent business processes. Existing enterprise applications and data leverage the Business Application and Data Services of their operating environments such as CICS, IMS, DB2, etc. As these applications and data implementations evolve to become more flexible participants in business processes, enhanced capabilities of their underlying operating environments, for example support of emerging standards, can be fully utilized. The SOA Reference Architecture also contains a set of Business Application Services that provide runtime services required for new application components to be included in the integrated system. These application components provide new business logic required to adapt existing business processes to meet changing competitive and customer demands of the enterprise. Design and implementation of new business logic components for integration enables them to be fully re-useable, allowing them to participate in new and updated business processes over time. The Business Application Services include functions important to the traditional programmer for building maintainable, flexible, and re-useable business logic components. In many enterprise scenarios, business processes involve inter-actions with outside partners and suppliers. Integrating the systems of the partners and suppliers with those of the enterprise improves efficiency of the overall value chain. Partner Services provide the document, protocol, and partner management services required for efficient implementation of business-to-business processes and inter-actions. Underlying all these capabilities of the SOA Reference Architecture is a set of Infrastructure Services which provide security, directory, IT system management, and virtualization functions. The security and directory services include functions involving authentication and authorizations required for implementing, for example, single sign-on capabilities across a distributed and heterogeneous system. IT Services Management Services include functions that relate to scale and performance, for example edge services and clustering services, and the virtualization capabilities allow efficient use of computing resources based on load patterns, etc. The ability to leverage grids and grid computing are also included in infrastructural services. While many of the Infrastructure and IT Service Management services perform functions tied directly to hardware or system implementations, others provide functions that interact directly with integration services provided in other elements of the architecture through the ESB. These interactions typically involve services related to security, directory, and I/T operational systems management. The SOA Reference Architecture is a complete and comprehensive architecture that covers all the integration needs of an enterprise. Its services are well integrated and are delivered in a modular way, allowing SOA implementations to start at a small project level. As each additional project is addressed, new functions can be easily added, incrementally enhancing the scope of integration across the enterprise. In addition to supporting SOA strategies and solutions, the architecture itself is designed using principles of service orientation and function isolation.
  • **Main point: The SOA reference architecture is a vendor-neutral way of looking at and planning the set of services that go into building an SOA. The SOA reference architecture is a way of looking at the set of services that go into building an SOA. This architecture is not unique to IBM ; these are things that you need to consider when approaching SOA regardless of what products and services are used. These capabilities can be implemented on a build-as-you-go basis allowing capabilities and project level solutions to be easily added as new requirements are addressed over time. You can see that these services organized along the same lifecycle we’ve discussed. On the left in is Development Services which is model and assemble, in the middle are the elements of the deployment run-time environment you use and on the right is management. The backbone of the reference architecture is the enterprise service bus which facilitates communication between services. The reference architecture is a great tool for laying out roadmaps for pursuing SOA. Regardless of what kind of project you’re undertaking, it makes sense to lay it out on a reference architecture to see how the various services you’re designing are going to interact with each other Additional detail: The SOA Reference Architecture outlines the key capabilities that are required for comprehensive, enterprise wide SOA solutions. These capabilities can be implemented on a build-as-you-go basis allowing capabilities and project level solutions to be easily added as new requirements are addressed over time. Tools are an essential component of any comprehensive integration architecture. The SOA Architecture includes both Development Services which are used to implement custom artifacts that leverage the infrastructure capabilities, and Business Innovation & Optimization Services which are used to monitor and manage the runtime implementations at both the IT and business process levels. At the core of the SOA Reference Architecture is the Enterprise Service Bus . This delivers all of the inter-connectivity capabilities required to leverage the services implemented across the entire architecture. Transport services, event services, and mediation services are all provided through the ESB. The SOA Reference Architecture also contains a set of services that are oriented toward the integration of people, processes, and information: Interaction Services provide the capabilities required to deliver IT functions and data to end users, meeting the end-user's specific usage preferences. Process Services provide the control services required to manage the flow and interactions of multiple services in ways that implement business processes. Information Services provide the capabilities required to federate, replicate, and transform data sources that may be implemented in a variety of ways. Many of the services in an SOA are provided through existing applications; others are provided in newly implemented components; and others are provided through external connections to third party systems. Existing enterprise applications and enterprise data are accessible from the ESB through a set of Access Services that provide the bridging capabilities between legacy applications, pre-packaged applications, enterprise data stores and the ESB. The SOA Reference Architecture also contains a set of Partner Services that provide the document, protocol, and partner management capabilities required for business processes that involve inter-actions with outside partners and suppliers. Business Application Services provide runtime services required for new application components to be included in the integrated system. Underlying all these capabilities of the SOA Reference Architecture is a set of Infrastructure Services which are used to optimize throughput, availability and performance. IT Services Management Services include capabilities that relate to scale and performance, for example edge services, clustering services, and virtualization capabilities allow efficient use of computing resources based on load patterns. The SOA Reference Architecture is a complete and comprehensive architecture that covers all the integration needs of an enterprise. Its services are well integrated and are delivered in a modular way, allowing SOA implementations to start at a small project level. As each additional project is addressed, new functions can be easily added, incrementally enhancing the scope of integration across the enterprise. Background: The IBM SOA Foundation delivers the capabilities you need to adopt SOA through a comprehensive architecture. These capabilities can be implemented on a build-as-you-go basis, and yet, because of the architecture and its service orientation, capabilities and project level solutions can be easily added as new requirements are addressed over time. The SOA Reference Architecture shows the key capabilities that are required for comprehensive, enterprise wide SOA solutions. Development Services are an essential component of any comprehensive integration architecture. The SOA Architecture includes development tools, used to implement custom artifacts that leverage the infrastructure capabilities, and business performance management tools, used to monitor and manage the runtime implementations at both the IT and business process levels. Development tools allow people to efficiently complete specific tasks and create specific output based on their skills, their expertise, and their role within the enterprise. Business Analysts who analyze business process requirements need modeling tools that allow business processes to be charted and simulated. Software Architects need tool perspectives that allow them to model data, functional flows, system interactions, etc. Integration Specialists require capabilities that allow them to configure specific inter-connections in the integration solution. Programmers need tools that allow them to develop new business logic with little concern for the underlying platform. Yet, while it is important for each person to have a specific set of tool functions based on their role in the enterprise, the tooling environment must provide a framework that promotes joint development, asset management and deep collaboration among all these people. A common repository and functions common across all the developer perspectives (e.g. version control functions, project management functions, etc) are provided in the SOA Reference Architecture through a unified development platform. The Business Innovation & Optimization Services incorporate monitoring capabilities that aggregate operational and process metrics in order to efficiently manage systems and processes. Managing these systems requires a set of capabilities that span the needs of IT operations professionals and business analysts who manage the business operations of the enterprise. These capabilities are delivered through a set of comprehensive services that collect and present both IT and process-level data, allowing business dashboards, administrative dashboards, and other IT level displays to be used to manage system resources and business processes. Through these displays and services, it is possible for LOB and IT personnel to collaborate to determine, for example, what business process paths may not be performing at maximum efficiency, the impact of system problems on specific processes, or the relationship of system performance to business process performance. This collaboration allows IT personnel and assets to be tied more directly to the business success of the enterprise than they traditionally have been. One key feature of the SOA Reference Architecture is the linkage between the Development and the Business Innovation & Optimization Services. The ability to deliver runtime data and statistics into the development environment allows analyses to be completed that drive iterative process re-engineering through a continuous business process improvement cycle. At the core of the SOA Reference Architecture is the Enterprise Service Bus . This architectural construct delivers all the inter-connectivity capabilities required to leverage and use services implemented across the entire architecture. Transport services, event services, and mediation services are all provided through the ESB. Transport services provide the fundamental connection layer; event services allow the system to respond to specific stimuli that are part of a business process; and mediation services allow loose-coupling between interacting services in the system. The ESB is a key factor in enabling the service orientation of the SOA Reference Architecture to be leveraged in implementing service oriented solutions and can be implemented today to meet the quality of service requirements of any integration solution. The SOA Reference Architecture also contains a set of services that are oriented toward the integration of people, processes, and information. These services control the flow of interactions and data among people and automated application services in ways appropriate to the realization of a business process: - Interaction Services provide the capabilities required to deliver IT functions and data to end users, meeting the end-user's specific usage preferences. - Process Services provide the control services required to manage the flow and interactions of multiple services in ways that implement business processes. - Information Services provide the capabilities required to federate, replicate, and transform data sources that may be implemented in a variety of ways. Automated application services, implementations of business logic in automated systems, are a critical part of any integration architecture or solution. Many of these services are provided through existing applications; others are provided in newly implemented components; and others are provided through external connections to third party systems. Existing enterprise applications and enterprise data are accessible from the ESB through a set of access services. These Access Services provide the bridging capabilities between legacy applications, pre-packaged applications, enterprise data stores (including relational, hierarchical and nontraditional, unstructured sources such as XML and Text), etc and the ESB. Using a consistent approach, these access services expose the data and functions of the existing enterprise applications, allowing them to be fully re-used and incorporated into functional flows that represent business processes. Existing enterprise applications and data leverage the Business Application and Data Services of their operating environments such as CICS, IMS, DB2, etc. As these applications and data implementations evolve to become more flexible participants in business processes, enhanced capabilities of their underlying operating environments, for example support of emerging standards, can be fully utilized. The SOA Reference Architecture also contains a set of Business Application Services that provide runtime services required for new application components to be included in the integrated system. These application components provide new business logic required to adapt existing business processes to meet changing competitive and customer demands of the enterprise. Design and implementation of new business logic components for integration enables them to be fully re-useable, allowing them to participate in new and updated business processes over time. The Business Application Services include functions important to the traditional programmer for building maintainable, flexible, and re-useable business logic components. In many enterprise scenarios, business processes involve inter-actions with outside partners and suppliers. Integrating the systems of the partners and suppliers with those of the enterprise improves efficiency of the overall value chain. Partner Services provide the document, protocol, and partner management services required for efficient implementation of business-to-business processes and inter-actions. Underlying all these capabilities of the SOA Reference Architecture is a set of Infrastructure Services which provide security, directory, IT system management, and virtualization functions. The security and directory services include functions involving authentication and authorizations required for implementing, for example, single sign-on capabilities across a distributed and heterogeneous system. IT Services Management Services include functions that relate to scale and performance, for example edge services and clustering services, and the virtualization capabilities allow efficient use of computing resources based on load patterns, etc. The ability to leverage grids and grid computing are also included in infrastructural services. While many of the Infrastructure and IT Service Management services perform functions tied directly to hardware or system implementations, others provide functions that interact directly with integration services provided in other elements of the architecture through the ESB. These interactions typically involve services related to security, directory, and I/T operational systems management. The SOA Reference Architecture is a complete and comprehensive architecture that covers all the integration needs of an enterprise. Its services are well integrated and are delivered in a modular way, allowing SOA implementations to start at a small project level. As each additional project is addressed, new functions can be easily added, incrementally enhancing the scope of integration across the enterprise. In addition to supporting SOA strategies and solutions, the architecture itself is designed using principles of service orientation and function isolation.
  • The process of adopting Web services and SOA starts in many cases at the ad hoc stage on projects. This gradually evolves into a general technology adoption within a group that is engaging in that style of projects, using tools, technologies, standards, methods, and patterns that enable the creation of proofs of concept. Assessments and planning can be done at this stage of adoption. The functionality of the proposed services needs to be verified and validated. The operational side of using run-time tools (monitoring, management, security, registry, and so on) needs to be tested and prototyped. Once the technology adoption stage achieves some level of maturity, the results start trickling into the lines of business. They see the value in sharing services across lines of business to eliminate redundancy and having a single point of access to existing functionality that reduces complexity and cost and increases flexibility. The business begins using services to access common functionality, often starting at a technology level and then moving on to the business level, which can provide greater value. Businesses can start to partition the functionality they leverage so as to eliminate redundancy. As the lines of business start using these services, they partition functionality versus being redundant about that piece of functionality. With this comes a certain degree of business buy-in as the services start to percolate toward consolidation of business function across lines of business. At the enterprise adoption level, standards, governance, and institutionalization of IT occur, and this involves SOA, including the protocols, tools, standards, and service models that will be used in this context. Also, the funding models like shared funding, common pool, and one-sided business line can be employed to handle the issues with service implementation efforts.
  • It’s useful to have a basic understanding of RUP in order to understand RUP for SOA Chart shows that different disciplines require different amounts of effort at different phases of the project. E.g. Most of the requirements effort is during inception. This is standard RUP. RUP for SOA follows the same process, but tailors and extends it.
  • -> Any Methodology: ebusiness reference archt. GS-Method, Pattern for SOA -> Loosly coupled services insted of applications -> Business, Integration, Application and Runtime Patterns are consistent with SOA -> new candidate for Composite Pattern -> Value-Chain (combination of SelfService and recurring Extended Enterprise
  • - Facilitating sequential execution of busines services hosted by a number of target applications - Separates business process flow logic from individual application logic Process logic is governed by serial process rules that define execution rules With single source application execute sequence of target applications SOA: Business processes needing services – SOA delivering services -> powerfull complementary Process logic can be easily changed to include/exclude/re-sequence services Non SOA services and human provided services can be expected Important emerging standard for business process execution is: BPEL4WS Is should be easy to instantiate this pattern using Web services created using BPEL4WS compliant products RSA supports BPEL4WS
  • Elaborates the Service Model , for example, service dependencies, composition, quality of service requirements, service message specifications, design decisions, and so on Includes Service Litmus Test that “gates” service exposure decisions Subsystem Analysis Partitions into service components that will be responsible for service realization Component Specification Details component modeling, flow, information architecture, messages
  • Key Points The Tivoli solution addresses all three dimensions for effective composite application management. For the transactions dimension, the ITCAM for Response Time Tracking solution provides e nd-to-end transaction tracking to quickly identify and isolate problems. For the applications dimension, the ITCAM for WebSphere solution provides d rill down diagnostics for application performance problems for J2EE, CICS, MQ and IMS as well as providing data and analysis for the operational view of all resources. For those applications based on SOA , ITCAM for SOA provides both operational and deep dive information on the critical services supporting SOA based applications. For the resource monitoring dimension, the IBM Tivoli OMEGAMON XE for WebSphere Business Integration solution provides r esource analysis for WebSphere MQ, WebSphere Message Broker and WebSphere InterChange Server. Tivoli is uniquely positioned to provide a solution that addresses all three dimensions needed for effective management of composite applications.
  • Now we get in to next principle ‘Re Use’ and composite applications.. This slide describes heterogeneous infrastructure, wherein lies the business rules and intelligence.. Multiple Platforms and Programming Models Connectivity with a complex, heterogeneous, multi-architecture installed base Many Architectures Mix of service oriented, event oriented and message oriented architectures Diverse sets of Standards Open standards like Web services De facto standards like WebSphere MQ Legacy custom integration code Proprietary integration products Variety of Message Formats C, Cobol, SOAP, EDI, HL7, Swift, ebXML, cXML, RosettaNet, OAG BOD … Range of Scale and scope From simple point-to-point connections to hundreds of server applications From no clients to tens of thousands of instances of client applications From data centre, to branch office, mobile, embedded devices and telemetry Levels in Service Quality From assuring delivery of transactions worth $m to transient updates worth ¢ From public domain information to highly sensitive, critical instructions
  • **Main point: The SOA reference architecture is a vendor-neutral way of looking at and planning the set of services that go into building an SOA. The SOA reference architecture is a way of looking at the set of services that go into building an SOA. This architecture is not unique to IBM ; these are things that you need to consider when approaching SOA regardless of what products and services are used. These capabilities can be implemented on a build-as-you-go basis allowing capabilities and project level solutions to be easily added as new requirements are addressed over time. You can see that these services organized along the same lifecycle we’ve discussed. On the left in is Development Services which is model and assemble, in the middle are the elements of the deployment run-time environment you use and on the right is management. The backbone of the reference architecture is the enterprise service bus which facilitates communication between services. The reference architecture is a great tool for laying out roadmaps for pursuing SOA. Regardless of what kind of project you’re undertaking, it makes sense to lay it out on a reference architecture to see how the various services you’re designing are going to interact with each other Additional detail: The SOA Reference Architecture outlines the key capabilities that are required for comprehensive, enterprise wide SOA solutions. These capabilities can be implemented on a build-as-you-go basis allowing capabilities and project level solutions to be easily added as new requirements are addressed over time. Tools are an essential component of any comprehensive integration architecture. The SOA Architecture includes both Development Services which are used to implement custom artifacts that leverage the infrastructure capabilities, and Business Innovation & Optimization Services which are used to monitor and manage the runtime implementations at both the IT and business process levels. At the core of the SOA Reference Architecture is the Enterprise Service Bus . This delivers all of the inter-connectivity capabilities required to leverage the services implemented across the entire architecture. Transport services, event services, and mediation services are all provided through the ESB. The SOA Reference Architecture also contains a set of services that are oriented toward the integration of people, processes, and information: Interaction Services provide the capabilities required to deliver IT functions and data to end users, meeting the end-user's specific usage preferences. Process Services provide the control services required to manage the flow and interactions of multiple services in ways that implement business processes. Information Services provide the capabilities required to federate, replicate, and transform data sources that may be implemented in a variety of ways. Many of the services in an SOA are provided through existing applications; others are provided in newly implemented components; and others are provided through external connections to third party systems. Existing enterprise applications and enterprise data are accessible from the ESB through a set of Access Services that provide the bridging capabilities between legacy applications, pre-packaged applications, enterprise data stores and the ESB. The SOA Reference Architecture also contains a set of Partner Services that provide the document, protocol, and partner management capabilities required for business processes that involve inter-actions with outside partners and suppliers. Business Application Services provide runtime services required for new application components to be included in the integrated system. Underlying all these capabilities of the SOA Reference Architecture is a set of Infrastructure Services which are used to optimize throughput, availability and performance. IT Services Management Services include capabilities that relate to scale and performance, for example edge services, clustering services, and virtualization capabilities allow efficient use of computing resources based on load patterns. The SOA Reference Architecture is a complete and comprehensive architecture that covers all the integration needs of an enterprise. Its services are well integrated and are delivered in a modular way, allowing SOA implementations to start at a small project level. As each additional project is addressed, new functions can be easily added, incrementally enhancing the scope of integration across the enterprise. Background: The IBM SOA Foundation delivers the capabilities you need to adopt SOA through a comprehensive architecture. These capabilities can be implemented on a build-as-you-go basis, and yet, because of the architecture and its service orientation, capabilities and project level solutions can be easily added as new requirements are addressed over time. The SOA Reference Architecture shows the key capabilities that are required for comprehensive, enterprise wide SOA solutions. Development Services are an essential component of any comprehensive integration architecture. The SOA Architecture includes development tools, used to implement custom artifacts that leverage the infrastructure capabilities, and business performance management tools, used to monitor and manage the runtime implementations at both the IT and business process levels. Development tools allow people to efficiently complete specific tasks and create specific output based on their skills, their expertise, and their role within the enterprise. Business Analysts who analyze business process requirements need modeling tools that allow business processes to be charted and simulated. Software Architects need tool perspectives that allow them to model data, functional flows, system interactions, etc. Integration Specialists require capabilities that allow them to configure specific inter-connections in the integration solution. Programmers need tools that allow them to develop new business logic with little concern for the underlying platform. Yet, while it is important for each person to have a specific set of tool functions based on their role in the enterprise, the tooling environment must provide a framework that promotes joint development, asset management and deep collaboration among all these people. A common repository and functions common across all the developer perspectives (e.g. version control functions, project management functions, etc) are provided in the SOA Reference Architecture through a unified development platform. The Business Innovation & Optimization Services incorporate monitoring capabilities that aggregate operational and process metrics in order to efficiently manage systems and processes. Managing these systems requires a set of capabilities that span the needs of IT operations professionals and business analysts who manage the business operations of the enterprise. These capabilities are delivered through a set of comprehensive services that collect and present both IT and process-level data, allowing business dashboards, administrative dashboards, and other IT level displays to be used to manage system resources and business processes. Through these displays and services, it is possible for LOB and IT personnel to collaborate to determine, for example, what business process paths may not be performing at maximum efficiency, the impact of system problems on specific processes, or the relationship of system performance to business process performance. This collaboration allows IT personnel and assets to be tied more directly to the business success of the enterprise than they traditionally have been. One key feature of the SOA Reference Architecture is the linkage between the Development and the Business Innovation & Optimization Services. The ability to deliver runtime data and statistics into the development environment allows analyses to be completed that drive iterative process re-engineering through a continuous business process improvement cycle. At the core of the SOA Reference Architecture is the Enterprise Service Bus . This architectural construct delivers all the inter-connectivity capabilities required to leverage and use services implemented across the entire architecture. Transport services, event services, and mediation services are all provided through the ESB. Transport services provide the fundamental connection layer; event services allow the system to respond to specific stimuli that are part of a business process; and mediation services allow loose-coupling between interacting services in the system. The ESB is a key factor in enabling the service orientation of the SOA Reference Architecture to be leveraged in implementing service oriented solutions and can be implemented today to meet the quality of service requirements of any integration solution. The SOA Reference Architecture also contains a set of services that are oriented toward the integration of people, processes, and information. These services control the flow of interactions and data among people and automated application services in ways appropriate to the realization of a business process: - Interaction Services provide the capabilities required to deliver IT functions and data to end users, meeting the end-user's specific usage preferences. - Process Services provide the control services required to manage the flow and interactions of multiple services in ways that implement business processes. - Information Services provide the capabilities required to federate, replicate, and transform data sources that may be implemented in a variety of ways. Automated application services, implementations of business logic in automated systems, are a critical part of any integration architecture or solution. Many of these services are provided through existing applications; others are provided in newly implemented components; and others are provided through external connections to third party systems. Existing enterprise applications and enterprise data are accessible from the ESB through a set of access services. These Access Services provide the bridging capabilities between legacy applications, pre-packaged applications, enterprise data stores (including relational, hierarchical and nontraditional, unstructured sources such as XML and Text), etc and the ESB. Using a consistent approach, these access services expose the data and functions of the existing enterprise applications, allowing them to be fully re-used and incorporated into functional flows that represent business processes. Existing enterprise applications and data leverage the Business Application and Data Services of their operating environments such as CICS, IMS, DB2, etc. As these applications and data implementations evolve to become more flexible participants in business processes, enhanced capabilities of their underlying operating environments, for example support of emerging standards, can be fully utilized. The SOA Reference Architecture also contains a set of Business Application Services that provide runtime services required for new application components to be included in the integrated system. These application components provide new business logic required to adapt existing business processes to meet changing competitive and customer demands of the enterprise. Design and implementation of new business logic components for integration enables them to be fully re-useable, allowing them to participate in new and updated business processes over time. The Business Application Services include functions important to the traditional programmer for building maintainable, flexible, and re-useable business logic components. In many enterprise scenarios, business processes involve inter-actions with outside partners and suppliers. Integrating the systems of the partners and suppliers with those of the enterprise improves efficiency of the overall value chain. Partner Services provide the document, protocol, and partner management services required for efficient implementation of business-to-business processes and inter-actions. Underlying all these capabilities of the SOA Reference Architecture is a set of Infrastructure Services which provide security, directory, IT system management, and virtualization functions. The security and directory services include functions involving authentication and authorizations required for implementing, for example, single sign-on capabilities across a distributed and heterogeneous system. IT Services Management Services include functions that relate to scale and performance, for example edge services and clustering services, and the virtualization capabilities allow efficient use of computing resources based on load patterns, etc. The ability to leverage grids and grid computing are also included in infrastructural services. While many of the Infrastructure and IT Service Management services perform functions tied directly to hardware or system implementations, others provide functions that interact directly with integration services provided in other elements of the architecture through the ESB. These interactions typically involve services related to security, directory, and I/T operational systems management. The SOA Reference Architecture is a complete and comprehensive architecture that covers all the integration needs of an enterprise. Its services are well integrated and are delivered in a modular way, allowing SOA implementations to start at a small project level. As each additional project is addressed, new functions can be easily added, incrementally enhancing the scope of integration across the enterprise. In addition to supporting SOA strategies and solutions, the architecture itself is designed using principles of service orientation and function isolation.
  • *Main Point: The SOA Foundation is more than just software. Governance and process, best practices and education help deliver real value with the SOA Foundation The SOA Foundation is more than just software. The three areas outlined here are critical to ensure that you are successful in implementing SOA. Governance and process help provide structure to SOA with things like establishing an SOA center of excellence, use of the Rational unified process to help guide roll-out of SOA, and an IT infrastructure library to provide a central location for all your services. Governance is one of the key success factors for SOA. It is the “human side” of SOA and customers can benefit from the collective experience of an SOA leader like IBM when considering this. IBM offers SOA best practices with its SOA-related intellectual property gained through extensive customer experience. This experience can help you become more successful. Things like SOA patterns and our redbooks can help capture and convey SOA best practices to you. And we also offer a variety of roll-based education to help build skills. We offer a variety of classes both in person and through web-based distance learning. These are a few of the classes we offer to help you and your staff get the skills they need to be successful.
  • Current approaches to SOA Governance: Deploy SOA technology like service registries and SOA management solutions Registries needed to manage services at runtime but not sufficient on its own Management is most effective when done in the context of governance Fragmented, uncoordinated activities around SOA Inconsistent approaches that result in limited ability for reuse Business as usual Treat SOA projects same as others SOA governance planning What is needed: Comprehensive approach encompassing entire services lifecycle with multiple entry points Best practices, methodology and processes and tools and technology
  • - Most (if not all) of the Business and Integration patterns are applicable in the context of service-oriented architectures The Self-Service business pattern allows users to interact with business services. The Collaboration pattern enables collaborations between business partners that partly involve service integration and partly involve workflow and people. The Extended Enterprise business pattern allows one business to interact with another businesses’ services. ->These Business patterns are combined on the front-end using the Access Integration pattern and on the back-end using the Application Integration pattern.
  • - Method for discovering services (top-down) and leveraging services (bottom-up, from legacy and packaged applications) - 7 main steps - not necessarily linear and sequential, but rather exploratory and iterative, incrementing functionality and understanding of the team as the project proceeds. - find out which processes paralell and sequential 1a) Domain decomposition - business processes, sub-processes and use cases. - Set of functional areas (e.g. Value chain: customer – Retailer – warehouse – Manufacturer) inside / outside the enterprise -> Applying Business and application Integration patterns 2) Goal-service model creation - Discovery of business aligned services for the entire organization. - the business level use cases identified in domain decomposition are good candidates for services. - Test completness of identified services 3) Subsystem Analysis - Refine the business use cases into system use cases that support a given business process. - Applying application patterns -> subsystem interfaces, system use cases, business and technical components, their dependencies and flow 4) Service allocation ensure that all the services identified have a “home” that they are all traceable back to business goals and to components. every service has business value and is assigned to a component Find out service provider and consumer 5) Component specification -> develop specifications for the each of the components (rules,services, attributes, used components,...) 6) Structure components and services using patterns - structure components and services using patterns - Applying runtime patterns (establish middleware structue, allocate each service to middleware node) 7) Technology realization mapping Implementation mechanism must be resolved - Build new component functionality (roll your own). - Transform legacy to enable reuse of functionality exposed as services. - Integrate by wrapping legacy systems. - Buy and integrate with third party products. - Subscribe and out source parts of the functionality, especially via Webservices. ->Apply product mapping
  • Speaker Notes This description taken from Kerry Holley (DE, IGS) presentation on SOA Enablement in Toronto, March 2004 It’s important to explain to the audience that SOA is a broad term to represent concepts used in design and not a product or service offering. The aspects to SOA are business view, architecture view & implementation view. In the business view, we take look at the business and view them as set of services that can be offered to the stakeholders. At its core, any organization can be defined as a set of processes that are offered to stake holders as services. From a Architecture aspect, SOA focuses on the styles, principles and patterns that are required to create SOA solutions. These is a very important step in translating the business vision in to a solution and realizing the values. From a Implementation aspect, SOA deals with how to realize the business & architecture SOA vision. This includes implementation approaches like web services and the tools to develop them. In this session, we will focus on the Architectural aspect of SOA and how it is implemented with WebSphere Integration Reference Architecture..
  • Open up access to systems and get more flexibility around application; focus on what you’re doing with the asset rather than the asset itself. Business task. Reusing and externalizing business tasks to drive revenue and improve customer support http://www-306.ibm.com/software/ebusiness/jstart/casestudies/yamato.shtml http://www-306.ibm.com/software/ebusiness/jstart/casestudies/staples.shtml http://www-306.ibm.com/software/ebusiness/jstart/casestudies/renfe.shtml http://www-306.ibm.com/software/ebusiness/jstart/casestudies/rabobank.shtml
  • Open up access to systems and get more flexibility around application; focus on what you’re doing with the asset rather than the asset itself. Business task. Reusing and externalizing business tasks to drive revenue and improve customer support http://www-306.ibm.com/software/ebusiness/jstart/casestudies/yamato.shtml http://www-306.ibm.com/software/ebusiness/jstart/casestudies/staples.shtml http://www-306.ibm.com/software/ebusiness/jstart/casestudies/renfe.shtml http://www-306.ibm.com/software/ebusiness/jstart/casestudies/rabobank.shtml
  • Open up access to systems and get more flexibility around application; focus on what you’re doing with the asset rather than the asset itself. Business task. Reusing and externalizing business tasks to drive revenue and improve customer support http://www-306.ibm.com/software/ebusiness/jstart/casestudies/yamato.shtml http://www-306.ibm.com/software/ebusiness/jstart/casestudies/staples.shtml http://www-306.ibm.com/software/ebusiness/jstart/casestudies/renfe.shtml http://www-306.ibm.com/software/ebusiness/jstart/casestudies/rabobank.shtml
  • Open up access to systems and get more flexibility around application; focus on what you’re doing with the asset rather than the asset itself. Business task. Reusing and externalizing business tasks to drive revenue and improve customer support http://www-306.ibm.com/software/ebusiness/jstart/casestudies/yamato.shtml http://www-306.ibm.com/software/ebusiness/jstart/casestudies/staples.shtml http://www-306.ibm.com/software/ebusiness/jstart/casestudies/renfe.shtml http://www-306.ibm.com/software/ebusiness/jstart/casestudies/rabobank.shtml
  • Open up access to systems and get more flexibility around application; focus on what you’re doing with the asset rather than the asset itself. Business task. Reusing and externalizing business tasks to drive revenue and improve customer support http://www-306.ibm.com/software/ebusiness/jstart/casestudies/yamato.shtml http://www-306.ibm.com/software/ebusiness/jstart/casestudies/staples.shtml http://www-306.ibm.com/software/ebusiness/jstart/casestudies/renfe.shtml http://www-306.ibm.com/software/ebusiness/jstart/casestudies/rabobank.shtml
  • Transcript

    • 1. Consumable SOA with SOA Foundation [email_address] , MBCS CITP IBM Certified Consulting IT Specialist June-2006
    • 2. Agenda <ul><li>Big Picture – Overview </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Challenges, Concepts </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Where do I Start ? </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Service Creation Scenario </li></ul><ul><ul><li>SOA Foundation </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Demo (walk-through) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Service Creation Scenario </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>ITSOCarRental Application </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Model->Assemble->Deploy->Manage </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>References/Wrap up </li></ul>
    • 3. OK..here’s the
    • 4. Big Picture
    • 5. How many people does it take to screw a SOA light bulb ? Customers Software Vendors Industry Analysts System Integrators Architects Developers CEO/CIO/CFO
    • 6. SOA – A Different Perspective ? Customers Software Vendors Industry Analysts System Integrators Architects Developers How can we save more money ? Yet another hype !! Oh, its Web Services !! Buy an ESB !! Next Silver Bullet !! Its an Architecture You need to build a platform CEO/CIO/CFO Save Our Ass/Assets
    • 7. IBM’s view of Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) … a service? A repeatable business task – e.g., check customer credit; open new account … service orientation? A way of integrating your business as linked services and the outcomes that they bring … service oriented architecture (SOA)? An IT architectural style that supports service orientation … a composite application? A set of related & integrated services that support a business process built on an SOA
    • 8. SOA: Business Aligned IT Businesses require agile IT Architecture Build to change Incremental development cycle Orchestrated solutions that work together Loosely coupled Structure applications using services Implementation abstraction Build for permanence One long development cycle Application silos Tightly coupled Structure applications using components and objects Known implementation To Process/Service Oriented From Function Oriented
    • 9. SOA Adoption Challenges <ul><li>Where do I start ? </li></ul><ul><li>Where is the business value ? </li></ul><ul><li>What’s Service ? How do I build one ? </li></ul><ul><li>What about composite services ? </li></ul><ul><li>What Skills do I need ? </li></ul><ul><li>What technologies should I use ? </li></ul><ul><li>What do I do about my current infrastructure ? </li></ul>Complexity <ul><li>What’s Needed: </li></ul><ul><li>Entry Points </li></ul><ul><li>Control of Evolution </li></ul><ul><li>Make SOA more Consumable </li></ul>Don Ferguson, Chief Architect of SWG Simplify adoption of SOA
    • 10. Best Practices <ul><li>Leveraging knowledge and experience </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Break things down into smaller, manageable chunks !! </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Methodologies, Techniques, Guidelines & Patterns </li></ul></ul><ul><li>SOA Adoption Lifecycle, Reference Architecture, Process Modeling, Model-Driven Development, Patterns for e-business (P4eb) </li></ul><ul><li>SOA Governance </li></ul><ul><li>Methodologies </li></ul><ul><ul><li>IBM Component Business Model (CBM) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>IBM Global Method </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Rational Unified Process (RUP) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Service Oriented Modeling and Architecture (SOMA) </li></ul></ul>
    • 11. Introducing the IBM SOA Foundation Custom Apps. Leveraging existing IT Infrastructure Supports complete lifecycle with a modular approach Extends value of your existing investments, regardless of vendor Scalable ; start small and grow as fast as the business requires Extensive business and IT standards support; facilitating greater interoperability & portability IBM SOA Foundation : Integrated, open set of software, best practice, and patterns CICS IMS Provides What You Need to Get Started with SOA IBM SOA Foundation Software Skills & Support
    • 12. SOA Foundation Lifecycle <ul><li>Gather requirements </li></ul><ul><li>Model & Simulate </li></ul><ul><li>Design </li></ul><ul><li>Discover </li></ul><ul><li>Construct & Test </li></ul><ul><li>Compose </li></ul><ul><li>Integrate people </li></ul><ul><li>Integrate processes </li></ul><ul><li>Manage and integrate information </li></ul><ul><li>Manage applications & services </li></ul><ul><li>Manage identity & compliance </li></ul><ul><li>Monitor business metrics </li></ul><ul><li>Financial transparency </li></ul><ul><li>Business/IT alignment </li></ul><ul><li>Process control </li></ul>
    • 13. SOA Foundation Reference Architecture – Solution View Atomic Service Composite Service Registry Services atomic and composite Operational Systems Service Components Consumers Business Process Composition; choreography; business state machines Service Provider Service Consumer Integration (Enterprise Service Bus) QoS Layer (Security, Management & Monitoring Infrastructure Services) Data Architecture (meta-data) & Business Intelligence Governance Channel B2B Packaged Application Custom Application OO Application
    • 14. SOA Foundation Reference Architecture Required Services – Vision Creation Business Innovation & Optimization Services Development Services IT Service Management Infrastructure Services Partner Services Business App Services Access Services Interaction Services Process Services Information Services ESB Facilitates communication between services Apps & Info Assets
    • 15. From Abstract to Concrete Base Standards Requirements Guides developments of SOA Reference Model Specific Architectures Uses Input for Instantiate, configure and customize Tools and Platforms Services Industries WSDL XML & Schema SOAP WS-RM WS Addressing UDDI WS-Security WS-Trust WS-*
    • 16. Where do I Start ? SOA Scenarios Entry Points Common Scenarios 3 1 2 4 5
    • 17. Key Product Mappings Model Assemble Deploy Manage The list is not exhaustive; others will depend on the actual solution required  Tivoli Federated Identity Manager  WebSphere Message Broker  WebSphere Enterprise Service Bus  WebSphere Portal  Rational Data Architect      Business Process Management   Information As a Service  ‘ Bowstreet’ Portlet Factory Interaction & Collaboration Services Service Connectivity Service Creation       Tivoli CAM for WebSphere for SOA Tivoli CAM for WebSphere WebSphere Business Monitor WebSphere Information Server WebSphere Process Server WebSphere Application Server ND Rational Application Developer WebSphere Integration Developer Rational Software Architect WebSphere Business Modeler   
    • 18. Service Creation Scenario
    • 19. Service Creation Scenario <ul><li>Business Context </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Customer want to expose existing functions to wide variety of internal and external users </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Manage complexity – avoid point-to-point integration </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Business Value </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Ease integration challenge </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Leverage the business value of existing systems </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Enhance responsiveness to business demands </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Service Creation Scenario Realisation </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Create a Service Provider </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Directly expose existing applications as services </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Indirectly expose existing application as services via service components </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Create an EJB Web service top-down from WSDL </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Consume services from a 3 rd party Service Provider </li></ul></ul>
    • 20. Directly Exposing Existing Applications as Services - Options <ul><li>Transformation of Enterprise Information Systems (EIS) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Leverage investment in existing core-back end systems </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Greater re-use via SOA approach </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Eg. CICS </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Architectural Patterns </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Directly expose the application as service </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Direct access to CICS COMMAREA as Web services </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Indirectly expose the application via service component </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Create a middle-tier Web services façade for accessing CICS </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>CICS ECI Adapter with CICS Transaction Gateway </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Other options </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>HATS </li></ul></ul></ul></ul>
    • 21. Directly Expose Existing App as Service – Solution View Services atomic and composite Operational Systems Service Components Consumers Business Process Composition; choreography; business state machines Service Provider Service Consumer Integration (Enterprise Service Bus) QoS Layer (Security, Management & Monitoring Infrastructure Services) Data Architecture (meta-data) & Business Intelligence Governance Channel Packaged Application Mainframe Application OO Application
    • 22. Deployment Topology
    • 23. Directly Expose Existing App: Services and Product Mappings Business Innovation & Optimization Services Developmen t Services IT Service Management Infrastructure Services Partner Services Business App Services Access Services Interaction Services Process Services Information Services CICS TS WebSphere Developer for zSeries MQ OMEGAMON for CICS ESB Facilitates communication between services Apps & Info Assets
    • 24. Directly Expose Apps: Key Tasks <ul><li>Model </li></ul><ul><ul><li>No specific product required for Model </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Could use RUP for SOA, SOMA, P4eB </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Assemble </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Bottom-Up, Top-Down, Meet-in-the-Middle approach </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Bottom Up: Use Web Service Assistant to generate WSDL </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>WebSphere Developer for zSeries, Unit Test against CICS TS </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Retrieve COBOL artifacts, import, generate XML converters etc. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Deploy </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Use CICS TS to host Web Services </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Use MQ for Connectivity </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Manage </li></ul>
    • 25. Indirectly Expose Existing App: Services and Product Mappings Business Innovation & Optimization Services Developmen t Services IT Service Management Infrastructure Services Partner Services Business App Services Access Services Interaction Services Process Services Information Services CICS TG WebSphere Developer for zSeries ITCAM for SOA Rational Application Developer WAS ESB Facilitates communication between services Apps & Info Assets
    • 26. Runtime Topology: Possible Options <ul><li>WAS and CICS TG on Distributed </li></ul><ul><li>WAS on Distributed and CICS TG on z/OS </li></ul><ul><li>WAS on z/OS </li></ul>
    • 27. WAS on Distributed and CTG on z/OS
    • 28. Best Practices for SOA <ul><li>RUP for SOA </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Plug-ins </li></ul></ul><ul><li>SOA Adoption </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Inhibitors </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Anti-patterns and misconceptions </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Eg. No budget/vision, technology bandwagon, SOA Silver Bullet </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Identify when SOA is a good fit </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Define an adoption process </li></ul></ul><ul><li>SOA Governance </li></ul><ul><li>Service Identification and Design </li></ul><ul><li>Web Services </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Design for </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>De-coupling, re-use, stateless, granularity, encapsulation, invocation style </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Patterns </li></ul>
    • 29. Incremental scope of SOA adoption http://www-128.ibm.com/developerworks/webservices/library/ws-soa-simm/
    • 30. RUP Architecture RUP
    • 31. SOA and Patterns for e-business (P4eB)
    • 32. Example: SOA and P4EB - Application Integration Patterns Serial process application pattern <ul><li>Serial Interaction, No Parallel Interaction </li></ul>
    • 33. Service Creation Scenario: Patterns & Use Cases
    • 34. Demo
    • 35. Service Creation Scenario: ITSO Car Rental Company <ul><li>Initial Context </li></ul><ul><ul><li>1500 worldwide locations </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Variety of car models available for short-term rental </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Current App provides support for the following business processes </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Reserve Vehicle </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Check-out Vehicle </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Check-in Vehicle </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>J2EE based Web App (MVC) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>SOA Adoption </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Series of workshops with Execs and major stakeholders to gain better understanding of business issues/IT challenges </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>SOA is seen as an approach to reusing existing assets and expose them to external users </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Early proof point: Reserve Vehicle as a Service </li></ul></ul></ul>
    • 36. ITSO Car Rental Service - Business Context Travel partner A Travel partner B Travel partner C <Service Consumer> <Service Consumer> <Service Consumer> Partner Travel Agent ITSO Car Rental (J2EE App & Web Services) ITSO Car Rental (Client application UI) <Service Consumer> <Service Provider> ITSO Car Rental Agent ITSO Car Rental App Hosted by CICS TS Travel Partners (External) ITSO Car Rental (Internal) Internet
    • 37. ITSO Car Rental Service - System Context Travel partner A Travel partner B Travel partner C <Service Consumer> <Service Consumer> <Service Consumer> Partner Travel Agent ITSO Car Rental (Servlets, JSPs) <Service Consumer> ITSO Car Rental Agent Travel Partners (External) ITSO Car Rental (Internal) SOAP/HTTPS WS-Security ITSO Car Rental (CICS TS ) Payment TCP-IP/SSL SOAP/HTTP Internet ITSO Car Rental (Business Logic (EJBs) <Service Provider> Selected Web Services Exposed Web Services DB Reservation Vehicle Session Bean JCA Adapter
    • 38. SOMA Techniques: Top-Down Approach <ul><li>Identification </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Candidate Services </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Service “Litmus Test” </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Gates service exposure decision </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Subsystem Analysis </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Partition into service components, responsible for service realization </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Component Specification </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Details component modeling, flow, information architecture, messages </li></ul></ul>
    • 39. Domain Decomposition
    • 40. List of Services & Use Cases Use Cases UC1: Check Rates UC2: Check Vehicle Availability UC3: Create Reservation UC4: Check-out Vehicle UC5: Check-in Vehicle UC6: Process Payment UC7: Log Reservation Activity UC8: View Reservation Activity
    • 41. SOA Foundation Lifecycle – Product Mappings <ul><li>Rational Application Developer (RAD) </li></ul><ul><li>Rational Software Architect (RSA) </li></ul><ul><li>WebSphere App Server - ND </li></ul><ul><li>IBM Tivoli Composite Application Manager (ITCAM) for SOA </li></ul><ul><li>ITCAM for WebSphere </li></ul><ul><li>WebSphere Service Registry & Repository </li></ul><ul><li>Ration Unified Process for SOA </li></ul><ul><li>RSA </li></ul>
    • 42. ITSO Car Rental Testing
    • 43. SOA Challenges: Monitoring Service Level Agreements (SLAs)
    • 44. SLA Monitoring with ITCAM Family Delivering high-performing composite applications Monitor Infrastructure ITM, OMEGAMON XE ITCAM for RTT ITCAM for SOA Analyze and Measure Transactions & Services Manage Application ITCAM for WebSphere ITCAM for SOA Tivoli Enterprise Portal
    • 45. ITSO Car Rental Service Monitoring with ITCAM for SOA <ul><li>Automatic Service Discovery </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Service Providers </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Service Requesters </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Service Operations </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Service Metrics </li></ul><ul><ul><li># of Messages </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Message Size </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Response Time </li></ul></ul><ul><li>J2EE Instrumentation </li></ul><ul><ul><li>ITCAM for WebSphere </li></ul></ul>
    • 46. SLA Monitoring with ITCAM for SOA <ul><li>Monitor and Automatic Alerts </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Pre-defined Situations </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>User-defined Situations </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Manage SLAs </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Control message flow when thresholds reached </li></ul></ul>
    • 47. Web Services Navigator: Offline Trend Analysis <ul><li>Flow Patterns </li></ul><ul><li>Service Topology </li></ul><ul><li>Transaction Flows </li></ul>
    • 48. Wrap Up
    • 49. SOA Foundation <ul><li>SOA Foundation Lifecycle </li></ul><ul><li>SOA Foundation Logical Architecture Model </li></ul><ul><li>SOA Best Practices & Patterns </li></ul><ul><li>SOA Programming Model </li></ul><ul><li>SOA Foundation Scenarios </li></ul>
    • 50. What are you looking for.. How IBM can help.. <ul><li>SOA Planning Workshops: </li></ul><ul><li>SOA Jump Start </li></ul><ul><li>Project Definition Workshop </li></ul><ul><li>SOA Maturity Assessment </li></ul><ul><li>Client Proof of Value </li></ul><ul><li>BCS Services for SOA </li></ul><ul><li>Specific SOA Focus Areas: </li></ul><ul><li>Maximize People Productivity </li></ul><ul><li>Business Process Management </li></ul><ul><li>Information as a Service </li></ul><ul><li>Start with focus on Reuse </li></ul><ul><li>Start with focus on Connectivity </li></ul><ul><li>Business Driven Development </li></ul><ul><li>IT Service Management </li></ul><ul><li>Products for SOA Life Cycle : </li></ul><ul><li>Modeling Tools </li></ul><ul><li>Assembly Tools </li></ul><ul><li>Deployment Runtimes </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Process </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>People </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Information </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Application Infrastructure </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Management Tools </li></ul>Line of Business SOA projects The IBM SOA Value Proposition SOA Foundation Lifecycle 5 SOA Entry Points &quot;Where are you now ?“ &quot;Where do you want to go ?“ &quot;How quickly ?&quot;. 3 1 2 4 5
    • 51. Any More Questions/Comments ?
    • 52. <ul><li>Multiple Platforms </li></ul><ul><li>Programming Models </li></ul><ul><li>Programming Languages </li></ul><ul><li>Variety of Standards & Message Formats </li></ul><ul><li>Range of Scale and Scope </li></ul><ul><li>Levels in Service Quality </li></ul>Composite Applications Create New Challenges Web Services Publish/ Subscribe Managed FTP Asynchronous Messages RPG XML COBOL Copybook EDI-X.12 ACORD EDI-FACT ebXML AL3 HIPPA HL7 SWIFT FIX Custom Formats Synchronous RPC Word/Excel/PDF
    • 53. SOA Foundation Logical Architecture Model - Middleware Services View Business Innovation & Optimization Services Development Services Integrated environment for design and creation of solution assets Manage and secure services, applications & resources Facilitates better decision-making with real-time business information IT Service Management Infrastructure Services Optimizes throughput, availability and performance Partner Services Business App Services Access Services Connect with trading partners Build on a robust, scaleable, and secure services environment Facilitates interactions with existing information and application assets Interaction Services Process Services Information Services Enables collaboration between people, processes & information Orchestrate and automate business processes Manages diverse data and content in a unified manner ESB Facilitates communication between services Apps & Info Assets
    • 54. SOA Foundation is more than just Software <ul><li>Governance and Process </li></ul><ul><li>SOA Center of Excellence </li></ul><ul><li>Rational Unified Process (RUP) </li></ul><ul><li>IT Infrastructure Library (ITIL) </li></ul><ul><li>Best Practices </li></ul><ul><li>SOA-Related IP </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Patterns </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Redbooks </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Engagement Experience </li></ul><ul><li>Education </li></ul><ul><li>Introduction to Value and Governance Model of SOA </li></ul><ul><li>Web services for managers </li></ul><ul><li>Technologies and Standards for SOA Project Implementation </li></ul><ul><li>Design SOA Solutions and Apply Governance </li></ul>Software Skills & Support IBM SOA Foundation
    • 55. SOA Governance Lifecycle <ul><li>Define the Governance Approach </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Define/modify governance processes </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Design policies and enforcement mechanisms </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Identify success factors, metrics </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Identify owners and funding model </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Charter/refine SOA Center of Excellence </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Design governance IT infrastructure </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Monitor and Manage the Governance Processes </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Monitor compliance with policies </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Monitor compliance with governance arrangements </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Monitor IT effectiveness metrics </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Enable the Governance Model Incrementally </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Deploy governance mechanisms </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Deploy governance IT infrastructure </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Educate and deploy on expected behaviors and practices </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Deploy policies </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Plan the Governance Need </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Document and validate business strategy for SOA and IT </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Assess current IT and SOA capabilities </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Define/Refine SOA vision and strategy </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Review current Governance capabilities and arrangements </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Layout governance plan </li></ul></ul>
    • 56. SOA Architecture Approach – Overview Using Patterns of e-business with SOA approach
    • 57. SOA Architecture Approach – Seven Main Steps Using Patterns of e-business with an SOA approach
    • 58. Generic Use Cases and Scenario Selection
    • 59. IBM SOA Foundation Programming Model Goals <ul><li>Roles, Programming Rules and Tasks </li></ul><ul><li>Leverage existing apps and harmonise programming model </li></ul><ul><ul><li>CICS, IMS, MQ, J2EE, .NET, BPEL, XML, DB2, Oracle, SAP </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Simplify programming tasks </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Mask the difference between programming and re-use </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Service Components </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Technology and language neutral representation of services </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Service Data </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Technology independent representation of data exchanged between services </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Service Bus </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Service bus is transparent to the programming model </li></ul></ul></ul>
    • 60. Service Component Architecture: Overview Implementation Types Component Implementation Interface Reference I R Java BPEL Business Rule Selector Human Task State Machine Java WSDL Port Type Java WSDL Port Type
    • 61. Assemble Services : Wire Service Components Import Export Standalone Reference Service Component Service Component Service Module Wire Implementation I Java Implementation I R Java R I I R
    • 62. References <ul><ul><li>IBM Patterns for e-business http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/patterns/ </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Redbooks </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Patterns: Service-Oriented Architecture and Web Services (sg246303) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Patterns: Integrating Enterprise Service Buses in a Service-Oriented Architecture (sg247135) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Patterns: Implementing Self-Service in an SOA Environment (sg246680) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Patterns: Serial and Parallel Processes for Process Choreography and Workflow (sg246306) </li></ul></ul></ul>
    • 63. Reference Slides
    • 64. Aspects of SOA Business Architecture Implementation A set of services that a business wants to expose to customers and clients <ul><ul><li>an architectural style which requires a service provider, requestor and a service description. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>a set of architectural principles and patterns which address characteristics such as modularity , encapsulation , loose coupling , separation of concerns , reuse , composable and single implementation . </li></ul></ul>A programming model complete with standards, tools, methods and technologies such as web services. Roles
    • 65. Aspects of SOA: Implementation <ul><li>A well-defined, discoverable, unit of business function (invoke) </li></ul><ul><li>Defined using explicit interfaces </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Independent of service implementations </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Provides contract between service requestors and service providers </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Invokable through common communication protocols </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Provides interoperability and location transparency </li></ul></ul>Applications and Other Services Component-3 Component-2 operations Service Interface Hidden Service Implementation Details Service Component-1 operations operations
    • 66. SOA: Basic Concepts Service Consumer Service Provider Service Directory Application-A - Travel Agent - Retail Bank - Publishing House Application-B - Airline /Car Rental/Hotel Chain - Mortgage Specialist/Investment Banks - Office Supplies Company - Flight Reservation - Car Hire - Hotel Booking - Mortgage Lending - Office Supplies http://www.online_services.com Publish 1 Discover 2 Invoke 3
    • 67. SOA Scenario 1 – Service Creation Assemble: Rational Application Developer Deploy: WebSphere Application Server Manage : Tivoli Composite Application Manager for WebSphere Basic (included) Extensions: WebSphere Developer Studio for iSeries/zSeries; WebSphere XD, WebSphere Asset Analyzer <ul><li>Scenario: A new SOA application reuses business logic which is exposed as a service, as well as providing a new service. </li></ul><ul><li>Business Value: Improve levels of customer service; capitalize on new business opportunities. </li></ul><ul><li>Business Needs: Obtain Mortgage Rates, Stock Quote, Web-Enabled Information, etc. </li></ul><ul><li>Scenario Focus: Development tooling, programming models, development registry, basic business services, security. </li></ul>IBM SOA Foundation Service Consumer & Provider
    • 68. SOA Scenario 2 – Service Connectivity Model: Rational Software Architect Assemble: WebSphere Integration Developer Deploy: WebSphere ESB Manage: Tivoli Composite Application Manager for SOA Extensions: WebSphere Adapters, WebSphere MQ, WebSphere Message Broker, Tivoli Federated Identity Manager <ul><li>Scenario: Making assessable a set of core services available to a variety of potential clients, through the usage of intermediary service gateway or bus. </li></ul><ul><li>Business Value: Enhance Responsiveness to Business Demands </li></ul><ul><li>Business Needs: Accountability, Audit, Integrated Delivery of Products, Disparate Systems Integration </li></ul><ul><li>Scenario Focus: Gateway and enterprise service bus issues, interoperable standards, mediations, access services and runtime registries (provision-publish), security </li></ul>IBM SOA Foundation Multi-Channel Access to Core Services
    • 69. SOA Scenario 3 – Interaction & Collaboration Services Assemble: Rational Application Developer, ‘Bowstreet’ Portlet Factory, WebSphere Integration Developer Deploy: WebSphere Portal Manage: WebSphere Portal Extensions: WebSphere Process Server, WebSphere Everyplace Deployment, Tivoli Access Manager, Tivoli Federated Identity Manager <ul><li>Scenario: Single Sign-on, ad hoc aggregation of services on integrated user interface, ala w3.ibm. </li></ul><ul><li>Business Value: Improve consumeability of application, content and usability. </li></ul><ul><li>Business Needs: Increased productivity through role based employee portals, Consolidated view inventory, supply chain, Deepen customer relationships </li></ul><ul><li>Scenario Focus: Portals, UI and Client Side Management, Connectivity to Bus, runtime registries (consumption-subscribe), Basic business services, security. </li></ul>IBM SOA Foundation Service Aggregation
    • 70. SOA Scenario 4 – Business Process Management Model: WebSphere Business Modeler Assemble: WebSphere Integration Developer Deploy: WebSphere Process Server, Manage: WebSphere Business Monitor, Tivoli Composite Application Manager Extensions: WebSphere Adapters, WebSphere Portal, Tivoli Access Manager, Tivoli Federated Identity Manager <ul><li>Scenario: New employee process integrating an existing CRM workflow, Office Space and Telephone request work orders as well as a new Human Task to create various identities and IT accounts into a new workflow process. </li></ul><ul><li>Business Value: Simulate and test impact of change to business, Real time view of business effectiveness, Refine business processes through monitored execution. </li></ul><ul><li>Business Needs: Legislative compliance, Automate best practices </li></ul><ul><li>Scenario Focus: Business Modeling, Service Composition, Business Monitoring </li></ul>IBM SOA Foundation Process Automation
    • 71. SOA Scenario 5 – Information as a Service Model: WebSphere Business Modeler, Rational Data Architect Assemble: WebSphere Integration Developer, WebSphere DataStage Designer Deploy: WebSphere Information Server, WebSphere DataStage Integration Suite Manage: WebSphere Business Monitor, Tivoli Composite Application Manager Extensions: WebSphere Portal, Workplace Forms View/Server, Tivoli Access Manager, Tivoli Federated Identity Manager, DB2 <ul><li>Scenario: Forms based, work-flow coordinated Mortgage Application process that incorporates Data Quality, Transformation, External Service Calls and Master Data. </li></ul><ul><li>Business Value: Increased automation, improved data quality, centralization and standardization of data and business processes. </li></ul><ul><li>Business Needs: Automate best practices, improve information access and quality providing accurate, reconciled, current information from multiple data sources, process agility </li></ul><ul><li>Scenario Focus: Portals, Information Integration, Partner Services, Security </li></ul>IBM SOA Foundation Accurate, consistent and comprehensive master information

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