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  • Note: Highlight return from getting both components from IBM
  • Automobile Business Services CBM : E.g., Product Development Supporting things can only be automated --------- Here is a simplification of SOMA. The Output of CBM can be used in the first step. SOMA has a two pronged approach: top-down business driven and bottom-up leveraging legacy assets. Top-down business process and event analysis (what is missing from SOA) defines the value-net, the process decomposition, the events that trigger the processes The variation analysis allows the creation of highly configurable business and software components that minimize custom changes. Business services are linked to business goals IT components are identified and specified with the corresponding business services they expose Specify their orchestration and composition into what Gartner calls composite applications Map component and their services to the most appropriate technology that satisfies their Quality of Service (non-functional) needs These steps are generalizations of the SOMA method and allow the mapping of a business architecture to a software service-oriented architecture Aided by model-driven development at each step.
  • Enterprise portfolio Fractal application -------------------------- Appropriate application of granularity; not too narrow and not boil the ocean ------------------------- Prioritization/revenue/ ------------------------ Cbm  heat map  prioritized areas, focus soma on those
  • The execution model for componentization and web services discusses a seven step process. (set of activities and tasks) that combines a top-down business driven approach with a bottom-up approach where current legacy functions are considered and leveraged for providing functionality. In this slide – we’ll briefly address the seven steps and tasks and we will discuss each in greater detail in the subsequent charts. Step 1 is called Domain decomposition and consists of identifying the business eco-system or value chain; the functional areas it contains and is of relevance to the business; Decompose domain into subsystems Step 2 is Subsystem Analysis and it is used to analyze subsystems into Business and Technology components and services. The functional aspects specify a domain model with business components; the non-functional requirements often point to what technical components are needed (such as logging, messaging, notification, authentication, etc.) Step 3, Goal Service Model Creation Determines business goals their dependencies in terms of more concrete sub-goals. Then it determines the services required to fulfill each sub-goal, so that collectively the higher level goal can be achieved. This gives not only traceability back to business needs and goals, but also facilitates the verification that we have identified all the services needed. In Step 4 , we allocate the services we have uncovered to the components we have defined. The components have been identified around business process boundaries in step 1, from a top down perspective. Services have been identified in steps 2 and 3 and can now be allocated to be a service exposed by one of the identified components. Managing services from a component perspective facilitates the management of the services. Step 5 is Component specification. Now that the components, their services and behavior are know, let us specify them in detail and create a specification for what components we want to have in our system. Step 6 uses patterns and best-practices like the Enterprise Component pattern to structure these large-grained enterprise components. In the last step, step 7, we decide how we are going to realize these components and services: which ones we will build from scratch, which others, we will buy, transform (by using existing legacy systems through business rules extraction), integrate, subscribe to a service or outsource. Details on each of these steps follow.
  • Enterprise portfolio Fractal application -------------------------- Appropriate application of granularity; not too narrow and not boil the ocean ------------------------- Prioritization/revenue/ ------------------------ Cbm  heat map  prioritized areas, focus soma on those

Anwendungsentwicklung und -architekturen: "Paradigmenwechsel ... Anwendungsentwicklung und -architekturen: "Paradigmenwechsel ... Presentation Transcript

  • Methodology: From Component Business Model to Service Oriented Architecture Nuernberger Kreis – Softwaretag: 7. May 2004 Karin Duermeyer Distinguished Engineer & IBM Academy of Technology Member IBM Web Services Technology Council Member IBM Global Services
  • Agenda
    • Component Business Modeling
      • Motivation
      • Definitions, Metamodel
      • Industry CBM Maps: Define the logical path for change
      • Operating Environment Architecture
    • From Component Business Model to Service Oriented Architecture
      • What is SOA
      • Roads to SOA
      • SOMA: Service oriented Method and Architecture
      • SIMM: Service Integration Maturity Model
    • Service Offerings, Products and Education are available
  • Greater Flexibility Required From Business Models And The Supporting IT Architecture Flexible Business Transformation Business Process Outsourcing Mergers, Acquisitions & Divestitures Flexible IT On demand Operating Environment Requires Composable Services (SOA) Composable Processes (CBM) Component Business Modeling Development Infrastructure Management Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) Software Development Integration Infrastructure Management View slide
  • To address our clients’ business issues, we developed an approach that effectively links business and technology Business Model Technology Business Process POV Business Issue Companies Business Model Infrastructure Component Business Model (CBM) Operating Environment CBM + Operating Environment Integrated Response View slide
  • We have defined Component Business Maps for multiple industries. They are used to frame many different questions Where are the core and non-core activities? What shape is my organisation in the future? What are the current business priorities Where are the key programmes impacting? Who do I partner with to deliver the end to end value? What are the priorities for Technology?
  • A component business map is a tabular overview of a business A Business Component is a part of an enterprise that has the potential to operate autonomously, for example, as a separate company, or as part of another company. Columns are Business Competencies, defined as large business areas with characteristic skills and capabilities, for example, product development or supply chain.
    • An Operational Level characterises the scope of decision making. The three levels used in CBM are direct, control and execute.
      • Direct is about strategy, overall direction and policy.
      • Control is about monitoring, managing exceptions and tactical decision making
      • Execute is about doing the work
    Control Execute Direct Business Planning Business Unit Tracking Sales Management Credit Assessment Reconciliation Compliance Staff Appraisals Relationship Management Sector Management Product Management Production Administration Product Fulfillment Sales Marketing Campaigns Product Directory Credit Administration Customer Accounts General Ledger Document Management Customer Dialogue Contact Routing Staff Administration Business Administration New Business Development Relationship Management Servicing & Sales Product Fulfillment Financial Control and Accounting Sector Planning Portfolio Planning Account Planning Sales Planning Fulfillment Planning Fulfillment Planning
  • Example component business model for the credit card industry:
  • A Business Component is a part of an enterprise that has the potential to operate semi-independently, as a separate company, or as part of another company.
    • A business component
      • Has discrete boundaries, defined by the services that it uses as inputs and offers as outputs
      • Includes the resources, people, technology and know-how necessary to deliver some value
      • Is ‘black box’ in that the users don’t need to see the business activities that are inside
      • Can be (mostly) neatly separated—provides logical ‘cleave points’
      • Can have attributes, such as cost, revenue, importance to the business, etc.
    • Business services
      • are goods or services that a business component offers to other business components and/or to external parties
    Component Name Market Segment Planning Description To analyze markets and derive targets Services Used Services Offered
  • A business process can be represented as a collaboration among business components. Component Name Market Segment Planning Description To analyze segments and derive targets Component Name Business Strategy Description Define business strategy Component Name Segment Tracking Description Track target segments Business Plans Tracking Models & Targets Market Events To “Product Management” business component Product Portfolio Updates Product Portfolio Updates New product idea Or Competitive business need
  • An initial metamodel of CBM has been defined to strengthen further development. Operational Level Business Service provides uses evaluated by Business Business Competency 0..n 0..n 0..n 0..n 0..n 0..n 0..n Business Component Business Activity Business Process 0..n 0..n Strategic Capability EvaluationCriterion 0..n 0..n strategy enabled by 0..n 1 1 1 consists of classifies 1 1 classifies contains may be built from 0..n 1 contains 0..1
  • Key “Services” provided by a Business Component can be leveraged by multiple Business Processes that cut across the enterprise.
    • In this example, Loan Underwriting business component, provides two Business Services namely Accept_Loan_Application & Check_Loan_ Application_Status .
    • Both of these Services can be leveraged by multiple variations of Loan_Application_Submission process executed by various actors including Call Center Operators, Customers who are performing Self-Service on the Web, or Data entry professionals who scan and OCR loan applications submitted by snail mail.
    Loan Underwriting Accept Loan Application Check Loan Application Status
  • According to the strategic goals, different attribution should be applied Business Component Model Business Component “Heat Maps”
    • Goal: Quick financial wins
    • Value driver
    • Capabilities
    • Redundancies
    • Goal: Focus on Core competencies
    • Strategic values
    • Differentiating activities
    • Goal: Strategic Flexibility
    • External relationships
    • Impact on Time-to-market
    Concept of Component Attribution Source: IBM Institute for Business Value t t Finance Finance Financial Control Accounting &Finance Planning Asset & Liability Managemen Funds Management Trading General Ledger The Value Chain Planning Analysis & Refinement Execution and (S)TP Monitor and Manage Business Administration Marketing Asset Mgmt & Product Development Sales & Channel Management New Business Customer Service Contract Administration Business Administration Marketing Asset Mgmt & Product Development Sales & Channel Management New Business Customer Service Contract Administration Business Activity Level Operations Planning Service Management Contract & Policy Setup Channel Managemen t Campaign Managemen Alliance Management Product Management Manufacturing Planning Distribution Planning Operational Control t Claims processing Contact Servicing Inforce Processing Check Processing Contract Administratio n Correspondenc e Intelligent Routing Contact Repository Customer Profile Fees & Commission s End - customer marketing Campaign Execution Product Developmen Sales Support End - Consumer Sales Conservation Human Resource Business Planning Managemen t Manual Advisor/ Intermediary Administratio n Advisor/ Intermediar y Setup Wholesales Product Profile Implementatio n Regulatory Reporting Training Council Services Systems & Facilities Helpdesk Finance Finance Financial Control Accounting &Finance Planning Asset & Liability Managemen Funds Management Trading General Ledger The Value Chain Planning Analysis & Refinement Execution and (S)TP Monitor and Manage Business Administration Marketing Asset Mgmt & Product Development Sales & Channel Management New Business Customer Service Contract Administration Business Administration Marketing Asset Mgmt & Product Development Sales & Channel Management New Business Customer Service Contract Administration Business Activity Level Operations Planning Service Management Contract & Policy Setup Channel Managemen t Campaign Managemen Alliance Management Product Management Manufacturing Planning Distribution Planning Operational Control t Claims processing Contact Servicing Inforce Processing Check Processing Contract Administratio n Correspondenc e Intelligent Routing Contact Repository Customer Profile Fees & Commission s End - customer marketing Campaign Execution Product Developmen Sales Support End - Consumer Sales Conservation Human Resource Business Planning Managemen t Manual Advisor/ Intermediary Administratio n Advisor/ Intermediar y Setup Wholesales Product Profile Implementatio n Regulatory Reporting Training Council Services Systems & Facilities Helpdesk
  • Example path for change: Consumer goods industry Strategy Tactics Execution Product Management Customer Relationship Manufacturing Supply Chain & Distribution Business Administration Category/Brand Strategy Brand P&L Management Matching Supply and Demand Marketing Development & Effectiveness Product Ideation Marketing Execution Product Directory Category/Brand Planning Assessing Customer Satisfaction Customer Insights Account Management Value-Added Services Customer Account Servicing Retail Marketing Execution Customer Directory Manufacturing Strategy Supplier Relationship Management Production and Materials Planning Manufacturing Oversight Supplier Control Make Products Plant Inventory Management Manufacturing Procurement Assemble/Pkg. Products Distribution Oversight Distribution Center Operations Transportation Resources En route Inventory Management In-bound Logistics Corporate Strategy Alliance Management Line of Business Planning Business Performance Management External Market Analysis Organization and Process Design Legal and Regulatory Compliance Treasury and Risk Management Facilities and Equipment Management IT Systems and Operations HR Administration Customer Relationship Strategy Customer Relationship Planning Supply Chain Strategy Supply Chain Planning Out-bound Logistics Accounting and GL Indirect Procurement Corporate Planning Concept/Product Testing Product Development Product Management Consumer Service In-store Inventory Mgmt Seek external provider / external utility Transformational View Consolidate and/ or create internal utility No action Integrate and redesign
  • We have defined a draft version of the Component Business Maps for 17 industries. They are used as references in customer engagements
    • We have used the CBM Maps in engagements by:
      • Allianz
      • Dresdener
      • Nestle
      • Züricher Kantonalbank
    • Utilities
    • Chemical & Petroleum
    • Aerospace & Defense
    • Education
    • Healthcare
    • Government (Steuerwesen)
    • Travel & Transportation
    • Insurance
    • Media & Entertainment
    • Consumer Packaged Goods
    • Retail
    • Automotive
    • Telecommunication
    • Financial Markets
    • Banking
    • Electronics
    • Life Sciences (Pharma)
  • There are several architectural building blocks that need to be provided to establish an On Demand operation environment (ODOE) Source: IBM BCS, Technology as the Catalyst: “On Demand Technology Architecture Overview”, September 2003 U S E R B U S I N E S S Resource Virtualization Services Utility Business Services Business Function Services Business Process Choreo graphy Services Common Services User Access Services Service Level Automation and Orchestration Services User Interaction Services Information Management Services Component Business Services Enterprise Service Bus Choreography Personalization Reporting Custom Applications Packaged Applications Adaptation Business Rules Interaction Acquired Services Collaboration Presentation Connectivity Information Access Information Integration Analytics Metadata … … … … … … Business Connections Mediation, Messaging, Events Business Performance Management Business Service Business Service Business Service Business Service Billing Rating Metering Services Peering Settlement Application Services Infrastructure Services Availability Services Security Services Workload Services Configuration Services Problem Management Data Placement Server Storage Resource Mapping Network Information … … …
  • The CBM and ODOE has been connect to define a logical path for change
    • Define a model (e.g. with WBI Modeler) of the component to be transformed
    • Identify and design the required supporting infrastructure
    • Understand the underlying applications infrastructure and how it needs to change
    • Start with a “hot” component area – product identification
  • Agenda
    • Component Business Modeling
      • Motivation
      • Definitions, Metamodel
      • Industry CBM Maps: Define the logical path for change
      • Operating Environment Architecture
    • From Component Business Model to Service Oriented Architecture
      • What is SOA
      • Roads to SOA
      • SOMA: Service oriented Method and Architecture
      • SIMM: Service Integration Maturity Model
    • Service Offerings, Products and Education are available
  • Service-oriented Architecture (SOA) is supported by a service oriented infrastructure. SOA can mean slightly different things, but definitions are converging…
    • SOA can be expressed as
      • a set of architectural principles which address characteristics such as modularity, encapsulation, loose coupling, separation of concerns, composable and single implementation .
      • an architectural style which requires a service provider, requestor and a service description.
      • as a programming model complete with standards, tools, methods and technologies such as web services.
      • Or, a set of business aligned I/T services that support an organization’s business process goals and objectives ……using interface-based service descriptions that decouple the provider and consumer through open standards and protocols…
  • Elements Of An SOA Examples MANAGED & SECURE ENVIRONMENT User Authentication and management of Service Transactions BUILD Creating services from new or existing application functionality Expose legacy CICS daily trading results data as a service DEPLOY Making services available for use Make the service available through an application server USE Using services individually or in combination Utilize service to incorporate CICS data as part of an executive dashboard
  • IBM is Working with Customers at All Levels of SOA Adoption Implementing Individual Web Services Service Oriented Integration of Business Functions Enterprise Wide IT Transformation On Demand Business Transformation Creating services from tasks contained in new or existing applications Integrating services across multiple applications inside and outside the enterprise for a business objective An architected implementation enabling integration across business functions throughout an enterprise Broad transformation of existing business models or the deployment of new business models Business Value Entry Points Based On Business Priorities 1 2 3 4 CBM
  • An SOA Requires Multiple levels in its architecture Operational Systems Service-Oriented Architecture Business Process Architecture Component-based Architecture Presentation Architecture QoS Management & Monitoring Integration Architecture (Service Integration Bus) Object-oriented CICS/COBOL CRM, ERP Business Intelligence Process Choreography Composite Services Portlets 5 4 3 2 1 6 7 Enterprise Components
  • The SOA architecture Component Architecture Application Architecture Service Architecture Business Process Architecture
  • Roads to Service-Oriented Architecture
  • Service-oriented Method and Architecture (SOMA) CBM Top-down: business-driven Process, event and variation analysis Bottom-up: Leverage Legacy thru understanding and transformation Business Services linked To Business Goals Model-driven: “Let the tools do the walking” Specify IT Components , their services and flow Legacy Business Vision Map components & Services to best technology , Meeting QoS needs; Assemble worklfow Service-oriented Architecture 1 2 3 4 5 SOMA combines Business Vision with Modern and Legacy Assets To achieve an SOA for On-demand WBI-Modeler WSAD-IE Modernization Workbench
  • Service Oriented Method & Architecture (SOMA) takes the initial partitioning of functional areas from CBM and uses subsequent steps to map to an SOA.
    • SOMA is identifying business aligned services that leverage legacy and are tied to business goals and choosing appropriate product and technology mappings
    SOMA SOA Fill gap
  • Service Oriented Method & Architecture Combines top-down and bottom-up approaches to achieve an SOA
    • Top-down is the business driven part providing a holistic analysis driven by business needs
      • A blueprint for enterprise component services is created that is then realized by a combination of existing legacy functionality and new development efforts
    • Goals, processes, rules and services are taken into account
    • Bottom-up part of the approach uses a characterization of the existing systems and components and how they map back to business function to help outline the assets available to realize each of the components.
    Domain Decomposition Subsystem Analysis Service Allocation Goal Model Creation (Goal-Service Graphs ) Components Specification Structuring Enterprise Components and Process Modules Technology Realization Mapping Flow Composition Flow Allocation Internal/External Flow Specification Leverage Assets Event And Message Spec
  • SOMA is a Process with Seven Major Steps Domain Decomposition Subsystem Analysis Service Allocation Goal Model Creation (Goal-Service Graphs ) Components Specification Structuring Enterprise Components and Process Modules Technology Realization Mapping Business eco-system or value chain; Functional areas of the business Description; Decompose domain into subsystems (Business Context) Analyze subsystems into business and Technology components and services And compose the flow for subset of process Determine business goals, sub-goals and Services required to fulfill objectives Assign services and flow to components; Refactor components as needed; Extricate logic and rules; partition (Legacy Code Assessment) Specify details of components and Services and flows Use design and architectural patterns and Best-practices to design internals of service Components (Responsibility Matrix) Build vs. Buy vs. Subscribe vs. Transform Vs. Wrap; how will I realize my services Component functionality? (Migration Matrix) Flow Composition Flow Allocation Internal/External Flow Specification Leverage Assets 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Leverage existing assets : legacy, package Etc.
  • SOMA flow in a typical project Technology Realization Mapping: Map Components, Services to Implementation Current Business and Technical Architecture Future Enterprise and Application Architecture Decompose Business Domain Identify Subsystems, Components, use cases Specify Enterprise Components Create Business Goal/ Service Model Analyze Existing Assets Componentize Legacy Systems Allocate Services to Coarse-grained Components Service Repository Leverage Component Service repository 1a 2 3 1b 4 6 7 Structure Enterprise Components using Patterns 5 Bottom-up Top-down
  • Use Service Integration Maturity Model (SIMM) Process to map CBM to SOMA SOMA SOA Fill gap
  • Levels of Service-oriented Computing Maturity Interface Based Computing Service Oriented Computing
  • Levels of Service-oriented Computing Maturity
    • Stage 1: Service Identification
      • Integration and Wrapping
      • Service Description
    • Stage 2: Line of Business Services
      • Componentization of existing functionality and integration with new component-based technologies
      • Repository of common services and components
      • Reusability within the line of business
    • Stage 3: Enterprise Wide Services
      • Business architecture and business modeling
      • Orchestration and choreography of services
      • Reusability at the enterprise level
    • Stage 4: Services on Request
      • Autonomic Virtualization
      • Utility Services
      • Dynamically re-configurable
  • Services Integration Maturity Model (SIMM) Product Line 1 Product Line 2 Product Line 3 Line Specific Silos Silos Integrated Applications Stove Top Applications Component Applications Service Oriented Applications Service Orchestration Virtualized Services EAI Level 1 Level 3 Level 4 Level 5 Level 6 Level 7 Level 2 Dynamically Configurable Services Silos Silos Silos Specific and Shared Specific and Shared Specific and Shared Non Redundant Non Redundant Non Redundant Shared Services Shared Services Shared Services Coordinated Services Coordinated Services Coordinated Services Autonomous Infrastructure Autonomous Infrastructure Autonomous Infrastructure Configurable Business Processes Configurable Business Processes Configurable Business Processes
  • Description of Levels of Maturity A utility-based model; usage billing with variable price structure; pay-as-you-go On demand versus product purchase Business Process Orchestration with BPEL; Call/Invoke services provided by one component and required by the next; Externalize services for extra-organizational characteristics Identify / specify and build components and their services across product lines; build the provider side; web services when many suppliers need access Just-in-time integration and composition of services; Transaction-based billing; End-to-end extended enterprise integration; outsourcing transparent (outsourcing “interface”) Silos, batch, Applications stove-piped to one business line Lots of redundancy; very low or non-existent reuse or common services. Information interchange a major challenge Free up I/T spending on Maintenance for Enhancements; Consolidation/Migration, Web Enablement, Componentization, Wrapping with WS; Workflow; Coordinate Information Flow Harmonize information Flow through message-oriented EAI approaches; leverage legacy systems and Functions through legacy integration & transformation Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 Level 4 Level 5 Level 6 Level 7 Stove Top Applications Integrated Applications Component Applications Service Oriented Applications Service Orchestration Virtualized Services Dynamically Configurable Services
  • Recent work has identified the need for intermediate step(s) in moving from a business component to a service oriented architecture ? Collaborations, Activity Interactions, KPIs, Inputs, Outputs, Events, Triggers, & QoS data identified Validate Static CBM Create Dynamic CBM Create Business Process Model Deploy Solution SOA Elaboration Coarse-grained Services Fine-grained Services Target Business Services identified Business Process Definitions Flows & Services Portfolio created Conceptual & Specification level Solution Architecture created 1 2 3 5 Create Solution Architecture 4 Feedback from monitoring & management Currently the 5 step process begins with the validation of the static model. It is possible that once CBM is formalized and operationalized, this step may not be necessary.
  • Agenda
    • Component Business Modeling
      • Motivation
      • Definitions, Metamodel
      • Industry CBM Maps: Define the logical path for change
      • Operating Environment Architecture
    • From Component Business Model to Service Oriented Architecture
      • What is SOA
      • Roads to SOA
      • SOMA: Service oriented Method and Architecture
      • SIMM: Service Integration Maturity Model
    • Service Offerings, Products and Education are available
  • Service Offerings, Products and Education are available: Deploy Use Manage & Secure Products Education Services IBM WebSphere Business Integration Message Broker Product Specific Training SOA Training Redbooks SOA Roadmap of Best Practices IBM Component Business Modeling IBM Application Portfolio Rationalization IBM Assessments for Web Services IBM Architecture & Planning Services for Web Services IBM Strategy & Planning Services for Service Oriented Architecture IBM Assessments for Service Oriented Architecture IBM Application Renovation IBM Application Integration IBM Infrastructure Readiness Assessment IBM Infrastructure Strategy IBM Lotus Workplaces IBM Tivoli Identity Manager IBM Tivoli Business System Manager IBM Tivoli Monitoring for Business Integration IBM WebSphere Business Integration Monitor IBM Rational Rose XDE IBM WebSphere Business Integration Modeler Build IBM DB2 Information Integrator
  • New Educational Offerings
    • Patterns: Service Oriented Architecture and Web Services
    • WebSphere Web Services Information Roadmap
    • Using Web Services for Business Integration
    • WebSphere Version 5.1 Application Developer 5.1.1 Web Services Handbook
    • SOA Architect Training – Q3
      • UNIT 1:Value Sell
      • UNIT 2 Assessment
      • UNIT 3 Design
      • UNIT 4 SOA Technology and Standards
      • UNIT 5 IBM Assets and Resources
      • UNIT 6 Implementation
    • SW255 – Basic Web services - Available
    • SW422 - Advanced Web services – Update
    • Speed-start Web services Tutorials - Updated
    • Speed-start Web services Technical Briefings
    • SOA and Web services Zone
    Training
    • Topics will include:
    • The Value of the On Demand Operating Environment
    • Service Oriented Architectures: A Plan for Implementation
    • Web Services: Speeding up Return On Investment
    • Industry Roadmaps: Realizing Benefits with Real Customers
    • Building the Skills Inside and Outside Your Organization
    IBM Executive Technical Summit on SOA
    • SOA Project Blueprints
    • SOA Reference Architecture
    • Enterprise Solution Templates
    • Organizing for Successful SOA Projects
    • SOA Quality of Service
    • Engagement Definitions and Pain Points
    • Assessment Tools
    • SOA Design Examples
    SOA Roadmap to Best Practices
  • For More Information …
    • on demand Operating Environment and SOA
      • http://www.ibm.com/software/info/openenvironment/soa/
    • SOA and Web services Zone
      • http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/...
    • Redbooks
      • http://publib-b.boulder.ibm.com/Redbooks.nsf/redbooks/
    • Speed-start Web services
      • http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/offers/ws-speed-start/
  • Many thanks for your attention
  • In Financial Services, we are helping clients enable the integration of new channels for self-service and partners for compliance Best Practices in SOA and Web Services in Financial Services Brokerage Financial Services Bank Bank Insurance
    • Projected savings of $170M in three years
    • Eliminated need for clearinghouse
    • Reduced customer service costs
    • IGS teamed partnered to build a B2B system that automatically converts electronic communications to a HIPAA-compliant format
    • Costs reduced by $200M
    • Most disputes are resolved in one billing cycle
    • IGS developed a Service Oriented Architecture to integrate banks and automate a dispute resolution process
    • Lowered development and maintenance costs
    • Streamlined operations
    • Increased cross-sell opportunities
    • IGS developed a Service Oriented architecture to support the banks goal of providing an innovative mix of banking channels
    • Shortened time to market
    • Dramatically reduced processing time
    • Reduced development and maintenance costs
    • IGS leveraged existing systems and grid technology to provide an integrated client experience in a Service Oriented Architecture
    • Overall customer satisfaction improved by 1.6%
    • Customer retention up 12%
    • Household checking acquisitions up 19%
    • IGS partnered to develop a cross-channel solution for providing a consistent customer experience that captures customer data across channels
    Solution Benefits Description of Initiative Firm
  • Thoughtful coordination is required for appropriate leverage of these various approaches towards a cohesive capability ? Service Oriented Method & Architecture Research SWG SWG IGS Business Transformation Solutions BTS WBI Modeler Business Operations Model BOM