Photographer Analysis
Henry Buckham
Past Photographer: Albert Levy
• Albert Levy was a French architectural photographer who based his work
in both Europe and...
Photo #1
No distortion or warping
used, as this would not
represent the true
characteristics of the
building.

This photo ...
Photo #2
This photograph has been
taken at an increased
elevation when compared
to the other photographs I
am analysing. I...
Photo #3
In contrast to the two
previous photographs, this
shot is aimed at the front
façade of the building as
opposed to...
Present Photographer: Ty Cole
• Cole is an architectural photographer born in Alabama and now based in
New York. He mainly...
Photo #1
The purpose of this
photography may have
been to highlight the
discrepancy between
old and new, as the
building i...
Photo #2
This photograph
is another
example of a
front shot and
the only depth
visible here is
the shadows
cast by the bay...
Photo #3
This shot uses
a 3rd quarter
view to give us
an overall view
of the house
and show
depth and
construction.

Some ...
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Analysis

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Analysis

  1. 1. Photographer Analysis Henry Buckham
  2. 2. Past Photographer: Albert Levy • Albert Levy was a French architectural photographer who based his work in both Europe and America, pioneering architectural photography. He was a big name photographer who produced a lot of acclaimed work but there is surprisingly little information about his life. • Levy’s claim to fame was his 36 albums entitled ‘Albert Levy’s architectural photographic series’ of which there were 36 and contained around 30 photos each. He also developed gelatin dry plates in 1878, making him an early competitor of George Eastman, an inventor of many photographic processes and the founder of Kodak.
  3. 3. Photo #1 No distortion or warping used, as this would not represent the true characteristics of the building. This photo is monochrome and features a lot of straight, geometric edges and lack of complex shapes and curves, allowing us to easily distinguish the shapes of the building. This photograph is observational, as no models have been posed in front of the buildings or moved out of the way. This picture uses a 3rd quarter view which photographs a corner of the building. This allows us to see a perspective of both facades and show the true scale of the building. This is also helpful for architects and surveyors who are reviewing the structural integrity if the building is newly built. This photograph appears to have been taken at street level evidenced by the angle at which the building is displayed. The building itself is quite busy with a lot of intricate detail in the windows and walls, but the street is quite quiet. Levy may have chosen a quiet day to make sure that the photograph would bring out the building as a whole.
  4. 4. Photo #2 This photograph has been taken at an increased elevation when compared to the other photographs I am analysing. It is possible that Levy used a building across the street as a shooting location in order to get a more level shot of the building (a street shot would mean that the camera would be facing upwards, distorting the dimensions of the building slightly.) A 3rd quarter view is again used here, which gives a 3D aspect to the building in question (if it was just the front façade being photographed, there would not be much depth visible in the photograph.) As well as the popular use of being used for architectural study, this photograph could be used in advertising as well for a variety of purposes. Some examples could include a newspaper story or an ad that is selling rent space inside the particular building.
  5. 5. Photo #3 In contrast to the two previous photographs, this shot is aimed at the front façade of the building as opposed to a 3rd quarter view. This means that other than the diagonal faces of the turret on the left, we are not able to see any depth in the building aside from the shadows on the front. The background of this images appears to be mostly non-existent. If there were buildings or other scenery present around this building, it appears that Levy has cropped them out or used the time of day to obscure them. Again there is no distortion in this photograph. It consists of mostly straight lines in the brickwork and structure, but curved lines are present in the windows and arches, but even these are minimal to a certain degree and do not wholly affect the integrity of photograph. This means it could be used for both architectural review and for advertising.
  6. 6. Present Photographer: Ty Cole • Cole is an architectural photographer born in Alabama and now based in New York. He mainly focuses on architectural work but also produces nature and landscape work. He describes himself as working wherever plane, train or car will take him, and as such his portfolio contains a wide range of imagery based in many locations around the world, with urban centers being prominent. • Cole describes his driving force as passion for knowledge and documenting life.
  7. 7. Photo #1 The purpose of this photography may have been to highlight the discrepancy between old and new, as the building in the centre appears more modern than its surroundings. This building was shot with a front view so we cannot see the sides or any depth in the structure. Nothing seems to be posed in this shot and it is an observational view of the building. The lighting has been enhanced slightly via Photoshop.
  8. 8. Photo #2 This photograph is another example of a front shot and the only depth visible here is the shadows cast by the bay windows, that stick out a little further from the structure. HDR has been used to improve the colours in this photograph, as well as make shadows stand out more. This photo is strictly observational and very quiet, as not pedestrians or life can be seen.
  9. 9. Photo #3 This shot uses a 3rd quarter view to give us an overall view of the house and show depth and construction. Some example uses of this photo could be advertising for the builders or the photographer, or usage in architectural publications. Post-processing has been used in this shot give the light a more intensive and softer flair, evidenced by the interior lighting.

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