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BTEC National (Units 25, 26)

BTEC National (Units 25, 26)

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Assignment Brief Assignment Brief Document Transcript

  • Page 1 of 13 BTEC National Diploma in Creative Media Production Year 13 Unit 25: Television and Video Studies Unit 26: Film Studies Name: ................................................................................................... Deadline: ...................................................................................................
  • Page 2 of 13 ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ The Course Welcome to the BTEC National Diploma in Creative Media Production. You will find this a practical, work-related course on which you will learn by completing projects and assignments based on realistic workplace situations, activities and demands. We aim to help you to develop your creative and technical skills, as well as helping you to gain an understanding of the underlying theory of digital media production. In addition to learning about the employment area you have chosen, you will develop the skills needed to start a career in the media industry. To do this, you will be required to produce a portfolio of practical productions supported by paperwork and theoretical research. To be successful in doing this, you will have to work both independently and within groups in a professional manner, showing yourself to be organised, resourceful, reliable, committed and being capable of meeting strict deadlines. We hope that you will benefit from this challenging, yet rewarding course and that it will lead to you continuing your studies or eventually finding a job in the media industry. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  • Page 3 of 13 ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ Your Responsibilities  You are expected to treat all equipment and accommodation with care.  You are NOT allowed to bring food, drink or chewing gum into work areas.  You may NOT use mobile phones while you are working, unless otherwise instructed.  NEVER allow other students or friends to use equipment booked out to you, and do not leave equipment unattended at any time. If it is damaged, lost or stolen, it is YOUR responsibility! If you experience any problems with equipment, ask for help from your teacher. Do not try to repair equipment yourself. Please remember It is your responsibility to back up your work onto a memory stick at the end of every lesson. You are responsible for saving your work to the hard drive of the computer and the safekeeping of your original material. Please remember to take your memory stick at the end of every session, and only use the memory stick to transport work. You must provide a folder for each unit and bring it to every lesson. You will also be introduced to a referencing system to allow you to produce comprehensive bibliographies of the materials you have used in your study. How to contact your teacher… Telephone: 0208 498 1300 E-Mail: zchristodoulou@kshsonline.com ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  • Page 4 of 13 Unit 25: Television and Video Studies Unit Introduction This unit aims to develop your awareness of the ownership and structure of the television and video industry (both commercial and public), the key debates that have shaped and continue to shape the industry, and how audiences use and respond to television and video productions. The television and video industry is a major media producer, and its development and influence on audiences, in terms of entertainment, education and information, has provoked much debate, both within government and amongst the public. Whilst it is possible that its influence and power as a medium of communication is beginning to be eroded by new media, it still remains a huge force in social and cultural terms, and so has tremendous political importance. Anyone who wishes to work in this industry must have a good knowledge of the way it is currently structured and how it is likely to evolve, as well as a sound understanding of the debates about such matters, such as who controls it and how it relates to the society and the audiences that it theoretically serves. Through this unit, you will explore how ownership and regulation affect output and access to television products, including the impact of new technologies on production, distribution and consumption. Key issues and debates covered will include the maintenance of standards, the relationship between public service and commercial television, and the question about possible effects and influences on audiences. An analytical exploration of television and video products will enable you to understand better how producers and broadcasters target their audiences, and to make links between institution, text and audience. This unit provides an excellent opportunity for potential television employees to understand what determines the shape of television products. The unit will give you a real insight into the constraints on production both from a regulatory point of view and in terms of audience demands. Learning Outcomes 1. Understand the structure of the television and video industry in the UK 2. Know about the key issues and debates that affect the television and video industry 3. Be able to apply textual analysis techniques to the study of television / video products ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  • Page 5 of 13 ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ Unit 26: Film Studies Unit Introduction This unit aims to develop your understanding of how films are created for specific audiences and how they make meaning for those audiences through an exploration of industry practices and the application of a range of theoretical approaches. The insights that you develop will inform your future production work. All approaches to studying film are theoretical to a greater or lesser extent. Even casual discussion about movies often reveals recognition of, and a cultural investment in, the auteur as the source of the film’s meaning. A theoretical approach to film simply recognises that we need to consciously apply specific ways of responding to film texts in order to make our interpretation clear, not only to others but to ourselves as well. Done properly this is not merely an exercise in regurgitating theory; the effective application of theory and the use of specific analytical tools to produce different understandings of the same texts improves our understanding, enlivens our appreciation, and, for film practitioners, informs and enhances their production activity. Through following this unit, you will develop an understanding of a number of theoretical approaches to film and apply them to specific films. You will come to understand that films do not exist in a vacuum, nor do they simply appear like flowers in the spring. Rather, they are created by a range of determinants and influences that include the culture and politics of the country where they are produced, the finance that enables their production, the technology of film production, distribution and exhibition, and the nature and structure of the industry that produces them. In addition, you will explore the often complex relationship between audiences and films and will be able to understand why and how audiences watch and make sense of films in particular ways. Learning Outcomes 1. Be able to apply different analytical approaches to films 2. Understand the relationship between films and their production contexts 3. Understand the relationship between producers and audiences. 4. Understand the relationship between audiences and films ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  • Page 6 of 13 ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ Assessment Criteria for Unit 25: Television and Video Studies P1 Describe the structure of the television and video industry with some use of subject terminology M1 Explain the structure of the television and video industry with reference to detailed illustrative examples and generally correct use of subject terminology D1 Comprehensively explain the structure of the television and video industry with elucidated examples and consistently using subject terminology correctly P2 Outline accurately the key issues and debates that affect the television and video industry with some appropriate use of subject terminology M2 Explain the key issues and debates that affect the television and video industry with reference to detailed illustrative examples and generally correct use of subject terminology D2 Critically evaluate the key issues and debates that affect the television and video industry with supporting arguments and elucidated examples and consistently using subject terminology correctly P3 Describe television/video products through the application of textual analysis techniques with some appropriate use of subject terminology M3 Explain television/video products through the application of textual analysis techniques with reference to detailed illustrative examples and generally correct use of subject terminology D3 Critically evaluate television/ video products through the application of textual analysis techniques with supporting arguments and elucidated examples and consistently using subject terminology correctly ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  • Page 7 of 13 ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ Assessment Criteria for Unit 26: Film Studies P1 Apply approaches to analysing films with some appropriate use of subject terminology M1 Apply approaches to analysing films coherently with reference to detailed illustrative examples and generally correct use of subject terminology D1 Apply approaches to analysing films critically, supporting points with arguments and elucidated examples and consistently using subject terminology correctly P2 Describe the relationship between films and their production contexts with some appropriate use of subject terminology M2 Explain the relationship between films and their production contexts with reference to detailed illustrative examples and generally correct use of subject terminology D2 Comprehensively explain the relationship between films and their production contexts with elucidated examples and consistently using subject terminology correctly P3 Describe the relationship between producers and film audiences with some appropriate use of subject terminology M3 Explain the relationship between producers and film audiences with reference to detailed illustrative examples and generally correct use of subject terminology D3 Comprehensively explain the relationship between producers and film audiences with elucidated examples and consistently using subject terminology correctly P4 Describe the relationship between audiences and films with some appropriate use of subject terminology M4 Explain the relationship between audiences and films with reference to detailed illustrative examples and generally correct use of subject terminology D4 Comprehensively explain the relationship between audiences and films with elucidated examples and consistently using subject terminology correctly ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  • Page 8 of 13 ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ Tasks Task 1 (26 = P1, M1, D1) You are required to explore how camerawork, editing, mise-en-scène and sound construct meaning for (and provoke response from) the audience, in a five-minute extract of Training Day (2001). This will take the form of a 1000-word written piece, with illustrative visual material – for example, screen grabs from the film. Remember to create a separate bibliography that references any used sources. Things to consider: Message of the film; impact on audience; Blumler and Katz’s Uses and Gratifications theory (1974), Hall’s Encoding/Decoding theory (1973). Deadline: Monday 30th September 2013 ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ Task 2 (26 = P2, M2, D2) You are to write an illustrated 1000-word piece comparing a contemporary remake with the original version. The two films that you will be analysing are The 300 Spartans (1962) and 300 (2006). The article must focus on production contexts and the factors influencing those contexts. Remember to create a separate bibliography that references any used sources. Things to consider: Financial determinants; technologies of production; distribution and exhibition; trends; genres; stars; social, political and regulatory issues; synergy; horizontal and vertical integration. Deadline: Monday 14th October 2013 ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ Task 3 (26 = P3, M3, D3) You will write an article, for a custom-made film magazine, on the production and marketing techniques of the Pirates of the Caribbean film series (2003-2011). Remember to create a separate bibliography that references any used sources. Things to consider:
  • Page 9 of 13 Technologies used; locations used; the films’ cast; how the producer(s) considered the target audience during production; the publicity and marketing strategy of the films. Deadline: Friday 8th November 2013 ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ Task 4 (26 = P4, M4, D4) You will write an article, for a custom-made film magazine, on why you like a particular genre of film. Remember to create a separate bibliography that references any used sources. Things to consider: Active spectatorship; audience reception; readings; intertextuality; role of social networking; pre and post-viewing experiences. Deadline: Friday 29th November 2013 ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ Task 5 (25 = P1, M1, D1) Plan and design a slideshow that comprehensively explains and illustrates the structure of a specific television company. Remember to create a separate bibliography that references any used sources. Things to consider: Ownership; funding; synergy; examples of products / services (digital TV, on-demand); regulatory bodies (Ofcom, watershed, Broadcasting Act 1990). Deadline: Friday 20th December 2013 ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ Task 6 (25 = P2, M2, D2) Plan and design a slideshow that explains, illustrates and evaluates the key issues and debates that affect the TV and video industries. Remember to create a separate bibliography that references any used sources. Things to consider: Ratings wars; emergence of new technologies (Internet, smartphones); regulation; audience effect theories (hypodermic needle, uses and gratifications, encoding / decoding).
  • Page 10 of 13 Deadline: ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ Task 7 (25 = P3, M3, D3) You are required to critically evaluate a chosen television product by applying specific textual analysis techniques. This will take the form of a 1000-word written piece, with illustrative visual material – for example, screen grabs from the programme. Remember to create a separate bibliography that references any used sources. Things to consider: Genre; narrative; message of the programme; target audience; impact on audience; audience effect theories (hypodermic needle, uses and gratifications, encoding / decoding). Deadline: ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  • Page 11 of 13 ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ Task Deadlines Task 1 Monday 30th September 2013 Task 2 Monday 14th October 2013 Task 3 Friday 8th November 2013 Task 4 Friday 29th November 2013 Task 5 Friday 20th December 2013 Task 6 Task 7 Portfolio hand-in ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  • Page 12 of 13 ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ Recommended Reading Key: Author (year), Title (edition), Publisher. ISBN Branston and Stafford (2010) The Media Student’s Book (fifth edition), Routledge. ISBN: 978-0-415-55842-6 Connell B (2010), Exploring the Media: Text, Industry, Audience (second edition), Auteur. ISBN: 978-1-906733-47-6 Lacey N (2002), Media Institutions and Audiences: Key Concepts in Media Studies, Palgrave. ISBN: 0-333-65870-1 Long and Wall (2009) Media Studies: Texts, Production and Context, Pearson Education. ISBN: 978-1-4058-5847-2 Turow (2011), Media Today (fourth edition), Routledge. ISBN: 978-0-415-87608-7 The BBC’s About page – www.bbc.co.uk/aboutthebbc The BBC’s film site – www.bbc.co.uk/film The British Film Institute – www.bfi.org.uk The BFI’s History of Film and TV site – www.screenonline.org.uk The British Film Council – film.britishcouncil.org The Guardian’s film site – www.guardian.co.uk/film The Independent’s film site – www.independent.co.uk/arts-entertainment/film The Internet Movie Database – www.imdb.com The Sector Skills Council for Creative Media – www.skillset.org The Sector Skills Council for Creative Media’s TV site - http://www.creativeskillset.org/tv/industry ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  • Page 13 of 13 Notes