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Setting Up SharePoint 2013 on Windows Azure Infrastructure as a Service - SPSToronto
 

Setting Up SharePoint 2013 on Windows Azure Infrastructure as a Service - SPSToronto

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Presentation on Setting Up SharePoint 2013 on Windows Azure Infrastructure as a Service for SharePoint Saturday Toronto

Presentation on Setting Up SharePoint 2013 on Windows Azure Infrastructure as a Service for SharePoint Saturday Toronto

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  • Cloud computing is a model for enabling convenient, on-demand network access to a shared pool of configurable computing resources (e.g., networks, servers, storage, applications, and services) that can be rapidly provisioned and released with minimal management effort or service provider interaction
  • Cloud computing is a model for enabling convenient, on-demand network access to a shared pool of configurable computing resources (e.g., networks, servers, storage, applications, and services) that can be rapidly provisioned and released with minimal management effort or service provider interaction
  • These are all tied together using what’s called an AFFINITY GROUP.:: Basically, an affinity group tells the Azure fabric that everything in it should be as close as possible in a datacenter: The same container, the same rack, etcVirtual Machines in IaaS are made up of several building blocks:Virtual Machine / Compute Instance:: This is the actual VM and the resourcesStorage::: At the basic level, this is an OS disk on a Windows Azure Storage Account.:: You should add data disks for additional resources (storage space, and I/O)Virtual Network:: Allow communications between VMs, or a VPN back to your on-premises networkEndPoints:: Allow connectivity to & from the outside world, or Load Balancing
  • Sizes are fairly straightforward::: These double as you go up: 2 small = 1 medium, 2 medium = 1 large, etc:: Additional sizes for high-memory systems:: 20 Cores per subscription by default
  • Earlier I mentioned something called an AFFINITY GROUP, which groups components as close as possible to each other in the Physical DatacenterAvailability Sets are similar, but ensures components are in different Fault & Upgrade Domains. This is so where there are updates to the Azure Fabric (i.e. like there is on July 8th), or if a physical component fails, you can get higher availability (99.95%)
  • VHDs:Two types of disks::: OS:: DataReplication – 3x Local Redundant, 3x Geo-RedundantInside your Azure Subscription you can create one or more storage accountsLimited to 20 Storage Accounts Per SubscriptionEach Storage Account gives you ~5,000 IOPs Each Storage Account contains three types of storage:BlobsTablesQueuesFor IaaS you don’t really need to know the differenceVHDs are stored in Blobs
  • Allows communication between VMsDiscuss:SubnettingIPs, DNS, Gateway assigned via DHCP, 100 year lease as long as the VM is on
  • Allows communication between VMsDiscuss:SubnettingIPs, DNS, Gateway assigned via DHCP, 100 year lease as long as the VM is on
  • EndPointsAllow connectivity from the outside world to either a single VM, or multiple VMs (Load Balancing)Note: This is not application aware
  • Security:What do I mean by this?How is your SharePoint farm going to be configured? Is it in a new, non-trusted Active Directory domain, or is it in a domain that comes from the Azure VPN?Always – ALWAYS, use the SharePoint Best-Practice of Least-Privilege accountsUse different, strong passwords for each of these.How are uses going to authenticate?DesignHow is your Virtual Network going to be set up? Lots of subnets (Logical separation) or one subnet?DNS handled internally, or by a public provider? If they’re in a domain hosted in Azure, use AD DNSHigh AvailabillityPlan your Availability Sets FIRST! Separate Cloud Service for each TierYou can’t add a VM to an existing Availability Set AFTER it’s created – Planning is key
  • SQLHow are you going to scale out? Plan for this – you can’t have a SQL Cluster, so if you use the same SQL server for everything (or same SQL Alias) you have to Dismount and Mount databases to scale SQL outSQL Support – I’ll give you a link to the KB article on this, but plan for what’s support in SQL for Windows AzureMultiple Data disks are key to high performance. Use multiple disks with striping – put your TempDBs and TempDB logs on separate disks, backup to Azure BLOB directly or on another diskSecurity for SQL, use a Named Instance with a non-standard port (that’s not dymanic)ALIAS ALIASALIAS
  • Some things you can do to leverage your Azure resourcesUse a dedicated Cache Host instead of the AppFabric Cache Cluster. Put this on a high-memory server, and you’ll see better performance than having it split across multiple low-resource VMsSame with your Search Indexer – With FAST built in, SP 2013 Search is a beast. Put it on an A6/A7 VM and it’ll perform a lot better.SharePoint HA – What are the benefits of having multiple WFEs or App servers if you can’t have a SQL Cluster? Look at alternatives – SQL AlwaysOn, combined with SCOM & SC Service Manager and you can “Ghetto-rig” an automated SQL AlwaysOn Failover
  • Some things that are commonly missed or after-thoughts with AzureHow are you going to monitor your systems? SCOM on premises with certificates, or a dedicated SCOM server in Azure?Backups – You can use SQL to backup to Azure Blob storage, but what about your SP backups? PowerShell these into Azure Blob as wellDisaster Recovery – Have a cold-standby / warm-standby farm in another datacenter (not a sister datacenter), and restore your content?Windows Updates – Usually controlled by WSUS on-prem, but what about Azure? How are you going to test these, deploy, etc?Cumulative Updates – If this is an externally facing SharePoint Farm, recommend the latest SharePoint CU / Security Updates on all servers

Setting Up SharePoint 2013 on Windows Azure Infrastructure as a Service - SPSToronto Setting Up SharePoint 2013 on Windows Azure Infrastructure as a Service - SPSToronto Presentation Transcript

  • Setting up SharePoint 2013 on Windows Azure IaaS Zach Millis Zach.Millis@imason.com
  •  Intro  Windows Azure IaaS Components  Architecting SharePoint for Windows Azure IaaS  Setting up SharePoint on Windows Azure IaaS  Tips & Tricks  Resources 2 Agenda
  • Intro Aka… Story Time! 3
  • Windows Azure Infrastructure as a Service  More than just a datacenter! 4 Cloud Computing • On-demand self-service • Broad network access • Resource pooling • Rapid elasticity • Measured Service
  • 5 What is IaaS? Infrastructure (as a Service)
  • Windows Azure IaaS Components 6
  • Windows Azure IaaS Components 7
  • Compute Instance Name Virtual Cores RAM Max Data Disks IOPS Extra Small (A0) Shared 768 MB 1 1x500 Small (A1) 1 1.75 GB 2 2x500 Medium (A2) 2 3.5 GB 4 4x500 Large (A3) 4 7 GB 8 8x500 Extra Large (A4) 8 14 GB 16 16x500 A6 4 28 GB 8 8x500 A7 8 56 GB 16 16x500 8 Windows Azure IaaS Components: VMs
  • 9 Windows Azure IaaS Components: VMs
  • 10 Windows Azure IaaS Components: Storage
  • 11 Windows Azure IaaS Components: Networking
  • 12 Windows Azure IaaS Components: Networking
  • 13 Windows Azure IaaS Components: EndPoints EndPoint
  • DEMO: Windows Azure Virtual Networks Windows Azure Virtual Machines 14
  • Architecting SharePoint for Windows Azure IaaS 15
  • Security  Standalone Domain  Least-privilege accounts  Authentication Design  Plan your Azure Virtual Network topology  Plan for your HA requirements Architecting SP 2013 for Windows Azure IaaS 10.0.0.4 10.0.0.5 10.0.1.4 10.0.1.5 10.0.2.4 10.0.2.5 10.0.3.4 10.0.3.5 16
  • SQL  How are you going to scale out?  Plan for SQL support on Azure  Multiple Data disks  Named instance, non-standard ports  Alias, Alias, Alias! Architecting SP 2013 for Windows Azure IaaS 17
  • SharePoint  Consider using a dedicated Cache Host  Consider using a dedicated Search Indexer  Your SharePoint HA is only as good as your SQL / AD HA  Use Scripts - http://autospinstaller.codeplex.com/  Alias, Alias, Alias! Architecting SP 2013 for Windows Azure IaaS 18
  • Commonly Forgotten…  Monitoring  Backups  Disaster Recovery  Windows Updates, Cumulative Updates, etc Architecting SP 2013 for Windows Azure IaaS 10.0.3.4 10.0.3.5 Cold Standby Cold Standby 19
  • Demo: SharePoint on Windows Azure IaaS 20
  • More Tips & Tricks 21
  • Planning  Planning is key!  Logical subnets  Logical server names  Start small (Medium)  Scale up  Test first  Software Support in Azure: http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2721672  SQL Support in Azure: http://support.microsoft.com/?id=956893 Tips & Tricks 22
  • Blogs  Scott Guthrie - http://weblogs.asp.net/scottgu  Windows Azure - http://blogs.msdn.com/b/windowsazure  Timothy Khouri - http://tk.azurewebsites.net Other  MSDN: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windowsazure  Technet: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/gg605186.aspx  Azure Management Portal: http://manage.windowsazure.com More Resources 23
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