How to play G Major Pentatonic Scale on 4 Different Positions on Guitar Fret board?
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How to play G Major Pentatonic Scale on 4 Different Positions on Guitar Fret board?

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This lesson will teach you how to play G Major Pentatonic Scale on 4 different positions on the guitar fret board. Please do share !

This lesson will teach you how to play G Major Pentatonic Scale on 4 different positions on the guitar fret board. Please do share !

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  • 1. G Major Pentatonic Scale on 4 DifferentPositions on the Fret boardThis lesson is related to the previous onewhere we checked out G Major Scale on 5different positions on the fret board; here wewill see a derivative scale of G Major Scale,which is the G Major Pentatonic Scale andhow to play it in different positions on theguitar fret board. “Penta” meaning 5, so thisscale has only 5 notes in it.G Major Pentatonic Scale notes are G-A-B-D-E-G1st PositionThis is the standard position where G MajorPentatonic scale is played when you firstlearn it. In this position, the scale notes arein a box like pattern. You will find 2 fretboard diagrams for all the positions in thislesson, one has the scale notes and the otherone tells you which fingers to use for eachnote on the fret board.In the 1st position you will play this scale in2 different octaves. An octave just meansplaying a scale in certain pitch. In this case,the first octave ends on 5th fret of the 4th
  • 2. string and the 2nd octave starts on the samenote and ends on the 3rd fret of the 1st string.2nd PositionThis is a stretched out version of this scalewhich starts on the 3rd fret of 6th String (E)and ends on the 8th fret of 2nd string (B). Theslanting lines indicate that you need to slidedown from one note to the other.
  • 3. 3rd PositionAs the 3rd position you will learn to play thisscale on a higher pitch. This is a box likepattern of the scale starting on the 10th fretof the 5th string (A) and ending on the 15th
  • 4. fret of the 1st string. There are two octaves inthis position too.4th PositionThis is the highest position (or octave)where you can play the G Major Pentatonicscale on a guitar fret-board. This positionstarts on the 15th fret of the 6th String (E) andprogresses all the way across the fret boardin a box like shape and ends on the 15th fretof the 1st string.There are two octaves in this position too.
  • 5. In the next chapter we will check out GMinor Pentatonic scale and positions.Guitar Learning TipsThe key to a fluid, versatile guitar playing isregular practice. So keep practicing thescales in as many possible ways and patternsthat you can think of by keeping theselessons provided in this blog as a referenceor any other learning resource you like forthat matter. And by the way, using ametronome will greatly improve the timingand perfection of your playing.Listening to a lot of songs from variousartists of favorite genre is another great wayto kindle your imagination and creativity.Try to learn the licks contained in thosesongs by ear and reproduce them on guitar
  • 6. which is the best way to get a lot of playingideas and improving your guitar skills. For more interesting lessons, you can check out my guitar blog @http://www.onlineguitarschools.com/gui tarblogOr Email me at deepakeapen@yahoo.com