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Beginner guitar course in PDF format to learn basics, scales and chords
 

Beginner guitar course in PDF format to learn basics, scales and chords

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A free guitar eBook (149 pages) in PDF for absolute beginners to build a solid foundation on the basic guitar concepts and music theory! Please download and share!

A free guitar eBook (149 pages) in PDF for absolute beginners to build a solid foundation on the basic guitar concepts and music theory! Please download and share!

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    Beginner guitar course in PDF format to learn basics, scales and chords Beginner guitar course in PDF format to learn basics, scales and chords Document Transcript

    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part I Preface ............................................................................................................. 6 2nd Part ............................................................................................................. 7 Chapter 1 – Getting Started - Basic concepts of guitar ..................................... 7 Parts of a Guitar ............................................................................................ 7 Names of the guitar strings ........................................................................... 8 Tuning your guitar ......................................................................................... 9 Playing the guitar .......................................................................................... 9 Reading tablature and musical notations ...................................................... 9 Practicing the guitar .................................................................................... 11 Chapter 2 – Western musical notations in depth – Learn to read 1st and 2nd string notes of guitar on a staff. ...................................................................... 11 Different types of notes ............................................................................... 13 Chapter 3 – Learning the 3rd and 4th strings notes on your guitar ................... 14 3rd String Notes ........................................................................................... 14 4th String notes ............................................................................................ 15 Practice tip .................................................................................................. 16 Chapter 4 – Learning 5th and 6th String Notes of a Guitar | Understanding Sharp and Flat Notes. ..................................................................................... 16 5th String Notes ........................................................................................... 16 6th String Notes ........................................................................................... 17 Sharp Note .................................................................................................. 17 Flat Note ..................................................................................................... 18 Chapter – 5 - Learning Different Type of Rests in Western Music is an Integral Part of Learning Guitar. .................................................................................. 19 Whole Rest ................................................................................................. 19 Half Rest ..................................................................................................... 20 Quarter Rest ............................................................................................... 21 Eighth Rest ................................................................................................. 21 Chapter 6 – 1st and 2nd String Exercises on your Guitar Using the Whole Note ....................................................................................................................... 22 Time Signature ............................................................................................ 22 1st string (e) exercises using whole note ..................................................... 22 Exercise 1 ................................................................................................... 23 Exercise 2 ................................................................................................... 24Chapter 7 – 2nd String Exercises on Guitar using Whole Note .......................... 24 Exercise 1 ....................................................................................................... 25 Exercise 2 ....................................................................................................... 26Chapter 8 – 3rd String Exercises on Guitar using Whole Notes ......................... 26 Exercise 1 ....................................................................................................... 27 Exercise 2 ....................................................................................................... 27Chapter 9 – 4th String Exercises on Guitar using the Whole Note ..................... 27 Exercise 1 ....................................................................................................... 28 Exercise 2 ....................................................................................................... 29Chapter 10 – 5th String Exercises on the Guitar using the Whole Note ............. 29 Exercise 1 ....................................................................................................... 30 Exercise 2 ....................................................................................................... 31 www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part IChapter 11 – 6th String Exercises on Guitar using Whole Notes ....................... 31 Exercise 1 ....................................................................................................... 32 Exercise 2 ....................................................................................................... 33Chapter 12 – 1st String Exercises on Guitar using Half Notes ........................... 33 Exercise 1 ....................................................................................................... 34 Exercise 2 ....................................................................................................... 35Chapter 13 – 2nd String Exercises on Guitar using Half Notes .......................... 35 Exercise 1 ....................................................................................................... 36 Exercise 2 ....................................................................................................... 37Chapter 14 – 3rd String Exercises on Guitar using Half Notes........................... 37 Exercise 1 ....................................................................................................... 38 Exercise 2 ....................................................................................................... 39Chapter 15 – 4th String Exercises on Guitar using Half Notes ........................... 39 Exercise 1 ....................................................................................................... 40 Exercise 2 ....................................................................................................... 41Chapter 16 – 5th String Exercises on Guitar using Half Notes ........................... 41 Exercise 1 ....................................................................................................... 42Chapter 17 – 6th String Exercises on Guitar using Half Notes ........................... 42 Exercise 1 ....................................................................................................... 43 Exercise 2 ....................................................................................................... 44Chapter 18 – 1st String Exercise on Guitar using Quarter Notes ....................... 44 Exercise .......................................................................................................... 45 Exercise 2 ....................................................................................................... 46Chapter 18 – 1st String Exercise on Guitar using Quarter Notes ....................... 46 Exercise .......................................................................................................... 47Chapter 19 – 2nd String Exercise on Guitar using Quarter Notes ...................... 47 Exercise .......................................................................................................... 48Chapter 20 – 3rd String Exercise on Guitar using Quarter Notes....................... 48 Exercise .......................................................................................................... 49Chapter 21 – 4th String Exercises on Guitar using Quarter Notes ..................... 49 Exercise 1 ....................................................................................................... 49 Exercise 2 ....................................................................................................... 50Chapter 22 – 5th String Exercises on Guitar using Quarter Notes ..................... 50 Exercise 1 ....................................................................................................... 51 Exercise 2 ....................................................................................................... 51Chapter 23 – 6th String Exercises on Guitar using Quarter Notes ..................... 51 Exercise 1 ....................................................................................................... 52 Exercise 2 ....................................................................................................... 52Chapter 24 – 1st String Exercises on Guitar using Eighth Notes ....................... 53 Practice Tips ................................................................................................... 53 Exercise 1 ....................................................................................................... 53 Exercise 2 ....................................................................................................... 54Chapter 25 – 2nd String Exercises on Guitar using Eighth Notes ...................... 54 Exercise 1 ....................................................................................................... 55 Exercise 2 ....................................................................................................... 56Chapter 26 – 3rd String Exercise on Guitar using Eighth Notes......................... 56 www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part I Exercise .......................................................................................................... 57Chapter 27 – 4th String Exercise on Guitar using Eighth Notes ......................... 57 Exercise .......................................................................................................... 58Chapter 28 – 5th String Exercise on Guitar using Eighth Notes ......................... 58 Exercise .......................................................................................................... 59Chapter 29 – 6th String Exercise on Guitar using Eighth Notes ......................... 59 Exercise .......................................................................................................... 60Chapter 30 – 1st String Exercises on Guitar using 4 Different Type of Notes .... 60 Exercise 1 ....................................................................................................... 61 Exercise 2 ....................................................................................................... 61Chapter 31 – 2nd String Exercises on Guitar using 4 Different Type of Notes ... 62 Exercise 1 ....................................................................................................... 62 Exercise 2 ....................................................................................................... 63Chapter 32 – 3rd String Exercises on Guitar using 4 Different Type of Notes.... 63 Exercise 1 ....................................................................................................... 64 Exercise 2 ....................................................................................................... 65Chapter 33 – 4th String Exercises on Guitar using 4 Different Type of Notes .... 65 Exercise 1 ....................................................................................................... 66 Exercise 2 ....................................................................................................... 67Chapter 34 – 5th String Exercises on Guitar using 4 Different Type of Notes .... 67 Exercise 1 ....................................................................................................... 68 Exercise 2 ....................................................................................................... 69Chapter 35 – 6th String Exercises on Guitar using 4 Different Type of Notes .... 69 Exercise 1 ....................................................................................................... 70 Exercise 2 ....................................................................................................... 71Chapter 36 – Understanding 4 Different Type of Rests and Tie Notes in WesternMusic for Guitar .................................................................................................. 71 4 Different Type of Rests ............................................................................ 72 Whole Rest ................................................................................................. 72 Half Rest ..................................................................................................... 72 Quarter Rest ............................................................................................... 72 Eighth Rest ................................................................................................. 73 Exercise on Rests ....................................................................................... 73 Ties ............................................................................................................. 73Chapter 37 – Learning Different Type of Dotted Notes in Western Music forGuitar ................................................................................................................. 74 What is a Dotted Note? ............................................................................... 74 Dotted Whole Note ...................................................................................... 74 Dotted Half Note ......................................................................................... 75 Dotted Quarter Note .................................................................................... 75 Dotted Eighth Note ...................................................................................... 76 Dotted Notes Exercise ................................................................................ 76Chapter 38 – Understanding Sharp and Flat Notes on the 1st String (e) of Guitar| Sharp and Flat Notes Exercises ....................................................................... 77 Important Facts about Sharp and Flat Notes .............................................. 78 Natural Note ................................................................................................ 78 www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part I Sharp Notes on 1st String (e) of Guitar ....................................................... 78 Tablature Version of the Above Exercise .................................................... 79 Flat Notes on 1st String (e) of Guitar........................................................... 79 Tablature Version of the Above Exercise .................................................... 80 Sharp Notes Exercise ................................................................................. 80 Tab .............................................................................................................. 81 Flat Notes Exercise ..................................................................................... 81 Tab .............................................................................................................. 82Chapter 39 – Introduction to Guitar Scales | Building Major Scales | Learning CMajor Scale ........................................................................................................ 82 What is a scale in Western Music? ............................................................. 82 Understanding 2 Kinds of Scales ................................................................ 82 Learning C Major Scale on Guitar ............................................................... 83 C Major Scale Notated on the Staff ............................................................. 84 Names of Scale Degrees ............................................................................ 84 C Major Scale on Tab ................................................................................. 84 Chromatic Scales – Building a Chromatic Scale from C Major Scale ......... 85 Chromatic Scale Notation on the Key of C .................................................. 85 Tab for Chromatic Scale on C Major ........................................................... 86Chapter 40 – Building the 3 Principal Chords from the Key of C Major DiatonicScale on Guitar .................................................................................................. 86 Tonic Chord – C Major ................................................................................ 86 Tab Notation of C Major Chord ................................................................... 87 Sub-Dominant Chord – F Major .................................................................. 88 Tab Notation of F Major Chord .................................................................... 88 Dominant Chord – G7 ................................................................................. 89 Tab Notation for G7 Chord .......................................................................... 90 Formula for Building a Major Chord ............................................................ 90Chapter 41 – Practicing the Principal Chords and Scale in the Key of C on Guitar........................................................................................................................... 91 Practice Tips ............................................................................................... 91 Exercise 1 – Practicing the 3 Principal Chords ........................................... 91 Different shapes of the 3 principal chords ................................................... 92 Slash Notation of Chords ............................................................................ 92 Exercise 2 – Practicing Arpeggios of the 3 Principal Chords ...................... 93 Exercise 3 – Practicing the Scale ................................................................ 95Chapter 42 – Learning A Natural Minor Scale and it’s 3 Principal Chords onGuitar ................................................................................................................. 96 Relative Minor Scale ................................................................................... 96 A Natural Minor Scale (as per the above formula) ...................................... 97 Tab for A Natural Minor Scale ..................................................................... 98 The 3 Principal Chords in “A” Natural Minor Scale ...................................... 98 Am Chord .................................................................................................... 98 Tab for Am Chord ....................................................................................... 99 Dm Chord.................................................................................................. 100 Tab for Dm Chord ..................................................................................... 101 www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part I E7 Chord ................................................................................................... 101 Tab for E7 Chord ...................................................................................... 102Chapter 43 – Practicing the 3 Principal Chords and A Natural Minor Scale onGuitar ............................................................................................................... 102 Practice Tip ............................................................................................... 102 Exercise of the 3 Principal Chords ............................................................ 103 Different Shapes of these 3 Chords on the Fret-Board ............................. 104 Arpeggio Exercise ..................................................................................... 105 Exercise of the Scale ................................................................................ 107Chapter 44 – Importance of Understanding Different types of Musical Intervals ina Scale while Learning Guitar .......................................................................... 108 Musical Interval ......................................................................................... 109 Tab ............................................................................................................ 110 4 Main Types of Intervals in Music – Major, Minor, Diminished and Augmented................................................................................................ 110 Tab ............................................................................................................ 111 Consonant Intervals .................................................................................. 111 Tab ............................................................................................................ 112 Dissonant Intervals.................................................................................... 112 Tab ............................................................................................................ 113Chapter 45 – Understanding Different Types of Minor Scales in Western Musicwhile Learning Guitar ....................................................................................... 113 Harmonic Minor Scale ............................................................................... 114 Tab ............................................................................................................ 114 Melodic Minor Scale .................................................................................. 114 Tab ............................................................................................................ 115 Mixed or Combined Minor Scale ............................................................... 115 Tab ............................................................................................................ 115 Hungarian or Gypsy Minor Scale .............................................................. 116 Tab ............................................................................................................ 116Chapter 46 – Learning G Major Scale and it’s 3 Principal Chords on Guitar .... 116 Understanding G Major Scale....................................................................... 117 G Major Scale Notation with Tab .................................................................. 117 3 Principal Chords in this scale..................................................................... 117 G Major Chord Fret diagram, Notation with Tab ....................................... 118 C Major Chord ........................................................................................... 118 D7 Chord Fret diagram, Notation with Tab................................................ 119Chapter 47 – Exercises of Principal Chords and Scale on the Key of G Major onGuitar ............................................................................................................... 120 Chords Exercise ........................................................................................ 121 Different Chord Shapes of these 3 Principal Chords ................................. 121 Arpeggio Exercise ..................................................................................... 122 Scale Exercise .......................................................................................... 123Chapter 48 – Understanding the 3 Different Patterns of C Major Scale on theGuitar Fret-Board ............................................................................................. 124 1st Pattern.................................................................................................. 124 www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part I 2nd pattern ................................................................................................. 125 3rd Pattern ................................................................................................. 125Chapter 49 – C Major Scale Exercises & Learning Different Kinds of Scales ofthe C Family ..................................................................................................... 126 Exercise 1 ................................................................................................. 127 Exercise 2 ................................................................................................. 128 C Natural Minor Scale ............................................................................... 128 Position 2 .................................................................................................. 129 Position 3 .................................................................................................. 130 C Harmonic Minor Scale ........................................................................... 130 C Melodic Minor Scale .............................................................................. 131 Major Pentatonic Scale ............................................................................. 131 C Major Pentatonic Scale.......................................................................... 131 Minor Pentatonic Scale ............................................................................. 132 C Minor Pentatonic Scale.......................................................................... 132 Blues Scale ............................................................................................... 133 C Blues Scale ........................................................................................... 133Chapter 50 – C Major, Minor Pentatonic and Blues Scales on a Different Positionon Guitar .......................................................................................................... 133Chapter 51 – Exercises on C Major and Minor Scales in 4 Patterns forDeveloping Speed ............................................................................................ 138 Practice Tips ............................................................................................. 138Chapter 52 – Learning to play the A Natural Minor Scale in Different Patterns onGuitar ............................................................................................................... 141Chapter 53 – Learning to Play Different Type of Scales of the A Family on Guitar ......................................................................................................................... 143 2nd Part ......................................................................................................... 148 Recommended Guitar Learning Resources .............................................. 148PrefaceThough many people dream of becoming an expert guitar player, most of themfail to accomplish it and sadly their dreams remain just a dream for ever. Thereasons are many – it may be due to lack of sustained interest, hard work,consistency or due to unavailability of an affordable and systematic course. Theinternet has a lot of information on learning guitar, but they are all scattered allover and not systematically arranged which is absolutely useless for beginners.Learning guitar should be a continuous and systematic process especially in thebeginning stages otherwise it is hard to sustain the interest and build a solidfoundation. I do agree that there are sites that have arranged their lessons in asystematic format - for beginners, but, they are either incomplete or not that easyto follow. www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part IThis guitar course has some useful guitar lessons capable of lifting you up froman absolute beginner to a much confident guitar player with a good foundationcapable of playing chords, scales and songs.2nd PartYou can get the 2nd part of this eBook by signing up to my email list hereYou can also check out my guitar blog where I will be adding new lessons andtips on a weekly basis, so please visit my site once in a week. Since this is a oneman effort you might not find my course to be of immaculate quality as a paidguitar course online. But I will always strive to make this as perfect and easy tofollow as possible for you. I am sure you will find this course helpful to get startedwith your dream of becoming a killer guitar player. Please do let me know yoursuggestions and feedbacks on info@onlineguitarschools.com.Chapter 1 – Getting Started - Basic concepts of guitarParts of a GuitarBefore you begin to learn guitar you must know your guitar. Here I have shownan acoustic guitar. An electric guitar will have additional parts than this like pickups, tremolo arm, volume, pick up and tone controls. But to start with you justneed to know the parts of an acoustic guitar. This picture will give you a goodidea about the different parts of the guitar. I need not explain much here as it isself explanatory. www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part INames of the guitar stringsA guitar has six strings, the 1st string – e- is the thinnest – the closest to theground – when you hold your guitar and the 6th string – E – is the thickest – thefarthest from the ground. Both the strings are ‘E’, the thinnest ‘e’ will have a lowerpitch and the thicker ‘E’ will have higher pitch. That’s the only difference. Thisgraphical representation will give you a better idea about it. www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part ITuning your guitarYou can tune the guitar either manually or using an electronic tuner – that youcan get it from any music store - or using a keyboard. But I would alwaysrecommend the first one, i.e. manual tuning as it is not dependent on anyexternal devices but your ears.Manual tuning -In manual tuning we use the 6th string(E) as a reference point totune the rest. • Tuning the 5th string(A) - Place your finger on the 5th fret of the 6th string and play the 6th string and open 5th; listen carefully to see if they sound the same, if not then adjust – loosen or tighten - the tuning peg of the 5th string until it sounds exactly like the 6th string. So now you have tuned the 5th string • Tuning the 4th string(D) - Place your finger on the 5th fret of the 5th string and play the 5th string and open 4th; listen carefully to see if they sound the same, if not then adjust – loosen or tighten - the tuning peg of the 4th string until it sounds exactly like the 5th string. So now you have tuned the 4th string. • Tuning the 3rd string(G) - Place your finger on the 5th fret of the 4th string and play the 4th string and open 3rd; listen carefully to see if they sound the same, if not then adjust – loosen or tighten - the tuning peg of the 3rd string until it sounds exactly like the 4th string. So now you have tuned the 3rd string. • Tuning the 2nd string (B) - Here there is a slight difference, instead of 5th fret you have to place your finger on the 4th fret of the 3rd string and play the 3rd string and open 2nd ; listen carefully to see if they sound the same, if not then adjust – loosen or tighten - the tuning peg of the 2nd string until it sounds exactly like the 3rd string. So now you have tuned the 2nd string. • Tuning the 1st string (e) - Place your finger on the 5th fret of the 2nd string and play the 2nd string and open 1st; listen carefully to see if they sound the same, if not then adjust – loosen or tighten - the tuning peg of the 1st string until it sounds exactly like the 2nd string. So now you have tuned the 1st string.Playing the guitarGuitar can be played using a plectrum – a small triangular plastic piece – orusing your finger tips.Reading tablature and musical notationsGuitar tablature is an alternative to traditional musical notations and a graphicalway to depict musical notes developed exclusively for guitar players. The guitartablature will have six lines that represent the 6 strings of the guitar on whichnumbers are used to denote the frets. But I would highly recommend you to learn www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part Ithe traditional musical notations first and use the tablature along with it becausetablature when used alone has few drawbacks that I will discuss later.In traditional western musical notation, the musical symbols or notes are placedon a staff or a stave which is a set of 5 horizontal lines and spaces representingdifferent musical pitch.. The staff starts with a clef sign and a time signature. Inguitar we use G Clef or the treble clef.The below pictures demonstrate the musical and tablature notations of the sixopen strings in a guitar. I will be covering more on reading traditional musicnotations in the next chapter.Open String = If a string is played without pressing any fret, then it is openstring. www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part IPracticing the guitarIn this section you need to just practice the open strings repeatedly until you arecomfortable and fluid with it. If you want you can even try out with frets. But Iwould recommend you to stick with open strings for the time being.Chapter 2 – Western musical notations in depth – Learn to read1st and 2nd string notes of guitar on a staff.In the 1st chapter we saw a brief introduction to musical notations and alsodenoting the open string notes - of a guitar - on a staff. In this chapter we willlearn western musical notations in detail.As we have discussed in the earlier chapter, in traditional music notation thenotes are placed on a staff. The lower pitched notes will appear on the lowerlines or spaces of the staff and high pitched ones on the higher lines and spaces.That’s all you need to know now.Now in this chapter we will see the notes on 1st (e) and 2nd (B) strings on theguitar and also the different types of notes - written on the staff.The picture below shows the 1st string (e) notes are on the staff. The tablaturenotation is also given along with it for your convenience. www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part IThe picture below shows the 2nd string (B) notes are on the staff. The tablaturenotation is also given along with it for your convenience. www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part IDifferent types of notesThere are 4 main types of notes in western music – a whole note, half note,quarter note and an eighth note.Whole NoteA whole note gets 4 beats i.e. you will play the note only once and then count 3beats. In the example below I have taken an open string note, the 1st string (e). Awhole note is denoted by an open circle.Half NoteA half note gets 2 beats i.e. you will play the note once and just count the 2ndbeat. 2 half notes will make a whole note. In the example below I have taken anopen string note, the 1st string (e). A half note is denoted by an open circle and astem.Quarter NoteA half note gets only one beat i.e. you will play the note for that beat. 4 half noteswill make a whole note. In the example below I have taken an open string note,the 1st string (e). A quarter note is denoted by an closed circle and a stem. www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part IEighth NoteAn eighth note gets only half a beat, so you need to play 2 eighth notes in thetiming of 1 quarter note to get 1 beat and it takes 8 eighth notes to make a wholenote. In the example below I have taken an open string note, the 1st string (e). Aneighth note is denoted by a closed circle with a stem and a flag. So it is alsoknown as a flag note.Chapter 3 – Learning the 3rd and 4th strings notes on your guitarIn the previous chapter we discussed the 1st and 2nd strings notes of a guitar and4 different types of notes in music; now in this chapter we will check out the noteson the next 2 strings i.e. G and D.3rd String NotesThere are only 2 main notes on the 3rd string of a guitar they are G and A. Thefirst note is open string note G and the 2nd note is A which played by pressing the www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part I2nd fret. This doesn’t mean that there are no more notes on a string. You can playall the notes – A B C D E F G A on all the strings, on different octaves.4th String notesThe 4th string has 3 notes – D, E and F. D is the open string note, E is on the 2ndfret and F is on the 3rd fret. www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part IPractice tipIt is highly recommended to practice your guitar on a regular basis – at least 1 or2 hours daily rather than spending 8 or 9 hours on a weekend. Initially you willget a sore finger, but never give up, just take and break and keep practicing.Revise on what you have learned and try playing around with your instrument fora while, it is exciting and you will be amazed to discover many new interestingthings on your guitar every single day. Excelling as a guitar player is all aboutbeing persistent and regular without losing your interest and morale when youmeet with a challenge.Chapter 4 – Learning 5th and 6th String Notes of a Guitar |Understanding Sharp and Flat Notes.In the previous chapter we checked out 3rd and 4th string notes of a guitar. In thischapter we will learn how to denote 5th and 6th string notes on a staff. We willalso learn sharp and flat notes in western music.5th String NotesThe 5th string notes are A, B and C. A is the open string note; B is played bypressing the 2nd fret and C is played by pressing the 3rd fret of the 5th string. Thebelow figure will make things clearer. Please check out the following staff andTab notations below. www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part I6th String NotesThe 6th string notes are E, F and G. E is the open string note; F note is played bypressing the 1st fret and G is played by pressing the 3rd fret of the 6th string.Please check out the following staff and Tab notations below.Sharp NoteA sharp note in western music is half step or half tone higher than the originalnote. For e.g. If you want to play F Sharp note, you just need to go one fret (halfstep) higher i.e. on the 2nd fret of the 1st string. Check out the notations below toget a better idea. A Sharp note is denoted by a # symbol.It’s not necessary that every note will have a sharp. The sharp note for the firststring ‘e’ is ‘F’ that is a half step higher, so there is no sharp note for ‘e’. So intechnical terms ‘e’ Sharp is enharmonically equivalent to ‘F’ natural note. A notewithout a sharp or flat is called a natural note.Half Step or Half tone – One fret higher ( e to F on 1st string or E to F on 4thstring)Whole Step or Whole tone – Two frets higher (F to G on first string or 6th string) www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part IFlat NoteA flat note in western music is half step or half tone lower than the original note.For e.g. If you want to play G Flat note, you just need to go one fret (half step)lower i.e. on the 2nd fret of the 1st string. Check out the below picture to get abetter idea. A Flat note is denoted by a ‘b’ symbol.Hey, by the way did you notice something? G Flat and F Sharp are one and thesame. Interesting isn’t it? So we in technical terms F# and Gb are enharmonicequivalents.Just like Sharp notes, it’s not necessary that every note will have a flat. The flatnote for the first string notes ‘F’ is ‘e’ that is a half step or tone lower, so there isno flat note for ‘F’. So in technical terms ‘F’ Flat is enharmonically equivalent to‘e’ natural note. www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part IChapter – 5 - Learning Different Type of Rests in Western Musicis an Integral Part of Learning Guitar.In chapter 2 we learned different types of notes – whole note, half note, quarternote and eighth note. In this chapter we will learn different types of ‘Rests’notations in western music and how to identify them on a staff. A ‘Rest’ in musicmeans a pause or silence for certain number of beat(s) - equivalent to a notevalue.There are 4 different types of rests – Whole rest, half rest, quarter rest and eighthrest - equivalent in lengths to the different types of notes that we learned inChapter 2.Whole RestA Whole Rest is denoted by a thick hyphen hanging from the 2nd line of the staffwhich indicates a 4 beat silence and is equivalent to a Whole Note. www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part IHalf RestA half rest is denoted by a thick hyphen sticking above the 3rd line of the staffwhich indicates a 2 beat silence and is equivalent to a Half Note. www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part IQuarter RestA Quarter Rest indicates the silence of a single beat and is denoted by a symboland is equivalent to the value of a Quarter Note. Please check the figure below.Eighth RestAn Eighth Rest indicates the silence of a half beat and is denoted by a symboland is equivalent to the value of an Eighth Note. Please check the figure below. www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part IChapter 6 – 1st and 2nd String Exercises on your Guitar Using theWhole NoteIn this chapter you will learn the 4/4 time signature. I have also given 2 exercisesto practice on the first string using the whole note.Time SignatureTime signature is denoted next to the treble clef sign (which indicates that thenotes are of higher pitch). The 4/4 time signature is the most widely used timesignature in western music. There are many other forms of time signatures – 3/4,2/4, 6/8 and so on, but I will just discuss 4/4 here. I will be discussing othercommonly used time signatures in the future chapters.The 4/4 time signature is also known as common time and denoted by a “C” likesymbol. The upper number ‘4’ indicates that there are 4 beats in a measure.Each measure a.k.a. bar is separated by a line. The bottom number ‘4’ indicatesthe type of note. In this case it is a quarter note. The four beats can be acombination of a half note and quarter notes or a whole note.The double bar (a thin line and the other thicker) indicates that it is the end of thatmusical piece.1st string (e) exercises using whole noteIn these exercises all the four notes on the first string that we learned in theprevious chapter need to be played using a whole note in different combinations. www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part IExercise 1 www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part IExercise 2Practice tip: Always start off playing any exercise on your guitar in a slow andsteady manner, and never hurry up for gaining speed. It will make your playingimperfect and sloppy. Your focus should always be on getting full control, speedwill follow automatically.Chapter 7 – 2nd String Exercises on Guitar using WholeNoteIn the previous chapter we learned 4/4 (common time) time signature and twopractice exercises on the 1st string using the whole note. In this chapter I have 2practice exercises on the guitar for the 2nd string using the whole note.Practice these exercises until you are absolutely thorough with the whole noteson the 2nd string(B). Practice it slowly and get a good control over theinstrument. The speed will follow. www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part IIn the next chapter we will check out the whole note exercises on the 3rd string(G).Exercise 1 www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part IExercise 2Chapter 8 – 3rd String Exercises on Guitar using WholeNotesIn this chapter I have prepared two exercises on 3rd string (B) of the guitar usingthe whole notes. In the previous chapter we checked out the whole notesexercises on the 2nd string.Practice it until you are thorough and confident with it. www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part IExercise 1Exercise 2Chapter 9 – 4th String Exercises on Guitar using theWhole NoteIn the previous chapter we checked out the 3rd string exercises using the wholenotes on guitar. In this chapter we will check out couple of interesting and easyexercises on the 4th string using the whole note. www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part IExercise 1 www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part IExercise 2Chapter 10 – 5th String Exercises on the Guitar usingthe Whole NoteIn this chapter we will check out 2 easy exercises on the 5th string (A) of theguitar using the whole note. In the previous chapter we checked out 2 exerciseson the 4th string using whole notes. www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part IExercise 1 www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part IExercise 2Chapter 11 – 6th String Exercises on Guitar using WholeNotesIn the previous chapter we saw 2 exercises on the 5th string of the guitar usingthe whole notes. In this chapter i have included 2 exercises on the 6th stringusing the whole notes. This completes the exercises on whole notes for all thestrings. You can create your own random exercises – with your imagination –using the whole note with different combinations of notes on each string. www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part IExercise 1 www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part IExercise 2Chapter 12 – 1st String Exercises on Guitar using HalfNotesIn the previous chapter we checked out the whole note exercises on the 6thstring that summed up the whole note exercises on all 6 strings. In this chapterwe will start with the half note exercises, beginning with the 1st string (e). www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part IExercise 1 www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part IExercise 2Chapter 13 – 2nd String Exercises on Guitar using HalfNotesIn the previous chapter we saw 2 exercises on the 1st string of the guitar usinghalf notes. In this chapter we will check out 2 exercises on the 2nd string usinghalf notes. www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part IExercise 1 www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part IExercise 2Chapter 14 – 3rd String Exercises on Guitar using HalfNotesIn the previous chapter we checked out 2 exercises on the 2nd string using thehalf notes. In this chapter we continue with the half note exercises. Here you canpractice 2 exercises on the 3rd string of your guitar using half notes. www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part IExercise 1 www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part IExercise 2Chapter 15 – 4th String Exercises on Guitar using HalfNotesIn the previous chapter we checked out 2 exercises on the 3rd string using halfnotes. In this chapter we will check out 2 exercises on the 4th string of the guitarusing half notes. www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part IExercise 1 www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part IExercise 2Chapter 16 – 5th String Exercises on Guitar using HalfNotesIn the previous chapter we checked out 2 exercises on the 4th string using halfnotes. In this chapter we are continuing with half notes and will check out 2exercises on the 5th string of the guitar using half notes. www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part IExercise 1Chapter 17 – 6th String Exercises on Guitar using HalfNotesIn the previous chapter we checked out 2 interesting exercises on the 5th stringof the guitar using half notes. This chapter has 2 exercises on the 6th stringending the half note exercises – on all six strings.Please practice all the exercises on all the six strings until you are absolutelycomfortable with them. Remember, speed is not what you want initially. Speedwill follow if you practice slowly and gain total control over the instrument. www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part IExercise 1 www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part IExercise 2Chapter 18 – 1st String Exercise on Guitar using QuarterNotesIn the last few chapters we checked out the half note exercises in western musicon guitar on all six strings. This chapter starts with the quarter note exercises.Let’s begin by checking out an interesting exercise on the 1st string of the guitarusing the quarter notes. www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part IExercise www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part IExercise 2Chapter 18 – 1st String Exercise on Guitar using QuarterNotesIn the last few chapters we checked out the half note exercises in western musicon guitar on all six strings. This chapter starts with the quarter note exercises.Let’s begin by checking out an interesting exercise on the 1st string of the guitarusing the quarter notes. www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part IExerciseChapter 19 – 2nd String Exercise on Guitar usingQuarter NotesIn the previous chapter we started off with the quarter note exercises on theguitar and checked out 2 interesting exercises on the 1st string. In this chapteryou can check out this interesting quarter notes exercise on the 2nd string. www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part IExerciseChapter 20 – 3rd String Exercise on Guitar using QuarterNotesIn the previous chapter we checked out 2 quarter note exercises on the 2ndstring. In this chapter we will check out this exciting exercise on the 3rd string ofthe guitar. www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part IExerciseChapter 21 – 4th String Exercises on Guitar usingQuarter NotesIn the previous chapter we checked out 2 exercises on the 3rd string (G) of theguitar using quarter notes. In this chapter we are continuing with the quarter noteexercises and will check out 2 interesting exercises on the 4th string (D).Exercise 1 www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part IExercise 2Chapter 22 – 5th String Exercises on Guitar usingQuarter NotesIn this chapter you will get to play 2 exercises on the 5th string (A) using thequarter notes. In the previous chapter we had checked out 2 exercises using thequarter notes on the 4th String (D). www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part IExercise 1Exercise 2Chapter 23 – 6th String Exercises on Guitar usingQuarter NotesIn the previous chapter we checked out 2 exercises on the 5th string (A) usingquarter notes. In this chapter you can practice 2 exercises on the 6th String (E) ofthe guitar. With this chapter the quarter note exercises are completed. www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part IKeep practicing all the exercises on all the strings until you are absolutely perfectwith them. Don’t hurry up for playing in speed, it will make your playing sloppy !So practice slowly and the speed will automatically follow.Exercise 1Exercise 2 www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part IChapter 24 – 1st String Exercises on Guitar using EighthNotesIn the previous chapter we completed the quarter note exercises on all 6 strings,which ended with 2 exercises on the 6th string (E). This chapter we are startingoff with eighth note exercises on the 1st string (e) of the guitar.Practice TipsInitially you can practice these exercises slowly to gain full control, then you canstart building up speed. The speed will automatically build up as you keeppracticing on a regular basis. I would request you to spend at least an hour ortwo daily – initially – for your guitar practice. This will help you to hone your guitarplaying skills and become a perfect guitar player. You can increase the practiceduration later on as you progress in your learning.Exercise 1 www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part IExercise 2Chapter 25 – 2nd String Exercises on Guitar usingEighth NotesIn the previous chapter we started off with the eighth note exercises and checkedout 2 exercises on the 1st string (e) of the guitar. In this chapter you can listenand play 2 exercises on the 2nd string (B) using eighth notes. Enjoy and practicehard! www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part IExercise 1 www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part IExercise 2Chapter 26 – 3rd String Exercise on Guitar using EighthNotesIn the previous chapter we checked out two 2nd string(B) exercises on guitarusing eighth notes. In this chapter we are continuing with the eighth notes andwill check out a short exercise on the 3rd string(G) using eighth notes. www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part IExerciseChapter 27 – 4th String Exercise on Guitar using EighthNotesIn the previous chapter we checked out an interesting exercise on the 3rd stringusing eighth notes. In this chapter we will check out another interesting exerciseon the 4th string using eighth notes. www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part IExerciseChapter 28 – 5th String Exercise on Guitar using EighthNotesIn the previous chapter we checked out an exercise on 4th string using eighthnotes. In this chapter we will check out an interesting exercise on the 5th stringusing eighth notes.Practice Tip – You can play the strings using up and down strokes (alternatepicking) with your pick (or plectrum) while practicing eighth note exercises onyour guitar. This picking style is easier than just downward picking and helps yougain speed. www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part IExerciseChapter 29 – 6th String Exercise on Guitar using EighthNotesIn the previous chapter we checked out an exercise on the 5th string(A) usingeighth notes. In this chapter we will check out another exercise on the 6thString(E) using eighth notes. This chapter concludes the eighth note exercises onall six strings of the guitar.Note: Please listen to the exercise for better understanding of the exercise. www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part IExerciseChapter 30 – 1st String Exercises on Guitar using 4Different Type of NotesIn the previous chapters we checked out different exercises using 4 major typeof notes in music theory i.e. whole note, half note, quarter note and eighth note.And, the last chapter covered the 6th string exercise on guitar using eighth notes.This chapter starts with some interesting and exciting exercises using all the 4different type of notes in music theory and we are starting off with 2 exercises onthe 1st string(e) of the guitar here in this chapter.Note: Please listen to the exercises repeatedly(and carefully) to learn how theyare played before practicing them. I am repeating this point – start practicingslowly until you get full control and sync over the left and right hands, i.e. thefingering patterns and string picking before thinking of speed. www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part IExercise 1Exercise 2 www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part IChapter 31 – 2nd String Exercises on Guitar using 4Different Type of NotesIn the previous chapter we started off with the exercises using the 4 main type ofnotes in western music and checked out 2 easy and interesting exercises on thefirst 1st string(e).Here in this chapter you will get to play 2 exercises on the 2nd string(B) of theguitar using those 4 different note types. So please listen to the exercises andpractice. Enjoy !Exercise 1 www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part IExercise 2Chapter 32 – 3rd String Exercises on Guitar using 4Different Type of NotesIn the previous chapter we checked out 2 interesting exercises on the 2ndstring(B) of the guitar using 4 different type of notes. In this chapter we will checkout 2 other exercises on the 3rd string(G). www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part IExercise 1 www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part IExercise 2Chapter 33 – 4th String Exercises on Guitar using 4Different Type of NotesIn the previous chapter we checked out 2 exercises on the 3rd string(G) of theguitar using 4 different type of notes. In this chapter we will check out 2 other www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part Iinteresting exercises on the 4th string(D) – again using the 4 major type of notesin western music – whole notes, half notes, quarter notes and eighth notes.Exercise 1 www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part IExercise 2Chapter 34 – 5th String Exercises on Guitar using 4Different Type of NotesIn the previous chapter we checked out 2 interesting exercises on the 4thString(D) of guitar using the 4 major type of notes in western music. In this www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part Ichapter we will check out 2 other exercises on the 5th string(A) using thosedifferent type of notes.Exercise 1 www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part IExercise 2Chapter 35 – 6th String Exercises on Guitar using 4Different Type of NotesIn the previous chapter we checked out 2 exercises on the 5th String (A) of theguitar using 4 different type of notes. In this chapter we will conclude theexercises on the different type of notes by checking out 2 more exercises on the6th String(E). www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part IExercise 1 www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part IExercise 2Chapter 36 – Understanding 4 Different Type of Restsand Tie Notes in Western Music for Guitar www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part IIn the previous chapter we checked out 2 exercises on the 6th string using 4major type of notes in western music – Whole note, half note, quarter note andeighth note. In this chapter we will cover the following topics 1. 4 Different type of rests 2. Ties4 Different Type of RestsJust like 4 different type of notes that we saw in one of the earlier chapters, thereare 4 different type of rests – Whole rest, Half Rest, Quarter Rest and Eighthrest, having the same time interval as the 4 different notes.Whole RestA whole rest is notated as a thick hyphen hanging down from the 4th ledger lineof the staff, as seen in the figure below. A whole rest has the equal time intervalof a whole note i.e. 4 beats, but unlike a whole note, there is complete silence forthe 4 beats.Half RestA half rest is notated like a hyphen sitting on the 3rd line of the staff and has thesame time interval of a half note i.e. 2 beats.Quarter RestA quarter rest is denoted as a symbol across the 2nd, 3rd and 4th lines of the staffas shown below in the figure and has the same time interval as a quarter note i.e.1 beat. www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part IEighth RestAn eighth rest is denoted as a symbol sitting on the 3rd line of the staff as shownbelow in the figure and has the same time interval as an eighth note i.e. ½ beat.Exercise on RestsTiesA tie is a curved line that combines the time values of two notes of the samepitch. The first note is played and the second note’s time value is just countedand not played.In the example below you can see the first tie between two quarter notes(A) onthe first string and the second tie between a half note(e) and a whole note(e).Note: Please listen to the following piece to learn how to play tied notes. www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part IChapter 37 – Learning Different Type of Dotted Notes inWestern Music for GuitarIn the previous chapter we checked out the different type of rests and ties inwestern music. In this chapter you will learn what are dotted notes in western andhow to play them on guitar.What is a Dotted Note?A dotted note increments the time value of a note by half of the note’s originalvalue. Here I have explained the 4 major types of dotted notes in this chapter.Dotted Whole NoteAs you know that the time value of a whole note is 4 beats. So, if you put a dotafter a whole note, the time value is incremented by 2 beats and the total timevalue of a dotted whole note becomes 6 beats. www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part IDotted Half NoteAs you know that the time value of a half note is 2 beats. So, if you put a dot aftera half note, the time value of the note is incremented by 1 beat and the total timevalue of a dotted half note becomes 3 beats.Dotted Quarter NoteAs you know that the time value of a quarter note is 1 beat. So, if you put a dotafter a quarter note, the time value of the note is incremented by ½ beat and thetotal time value of a dotted quarter note becomes 1 and ½ beats. www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part IDotted Eighth NoteAs you know that the time value of an eighth note is ½ beat. So, if you put a dotafter an eighth note, the time value of the note is incremented by ¼ beat and thetotal time value of a dotted eighth note becomes ¾ beat.Dotted notes are not restricted to just these 4 type of notes, you can createdotted notes out of any note type.Dotted Notes ExerciseYou might be wondering why there is a tie from the whole note to the half notetowards the end of the exercise, right? But don’t be confused, the tied whole noteis actually a dotted whole note. Since the exercise is on 4/4 (time signature), asingle measure cannot accommodate a dotted whole note – which is six beats inlength, hence a tie to a half note – which is 2 beats in length making it equivalentto the rhythmic time value of a dotted whole note i.e. 6 beats. www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part IChapter 38 – Understanding Sharp and Flat Notes on the1st String (e) of Guitar | Sharp and Flat Notes ExercisesIn one of the earlier chapters of this beginner guitar course I have explained thesharp and flat notes in western music in brief. But in this chapter I have 2exercises that will explain you the sharp and flat notes concept in detail using the1st String (e) notes of the guitar. These 2 exercises will help you learn how thesharp and flat note concepts work on a guitar fret. www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part IImportant Facts about Sharp and Flat NotesA note will have a sharp note only when there is whole tone or whole noteinterval with the next note.For e.g. The tonal interval between the notes E and F is half, so E wouldn’t havean E sharp. So if you say E sharp, you will play the note F.In terms of a guitar fret, a half step note would be the adjacent fret and a wholestep note would be one fret apart.Similarly a note will have a flat note only when there is whole tone or whole noteinterval with the previous note.For e.g. F wouldn’t have an F flat note because the tonal interval with it’sprevious note i.e. E is only half step.Natural NoteA natural note is nothing but a note which is neither a sharp nor a flat. Thisbecomes necessary if you want a note to remain as it is in the midst of sharp andflat notes.Sharp Notes on 1st String (e) of Guitar www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part ITablature Version of the Above ExerciseFlat Notes on 1st String (e) of Guitar www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part ITablature Version of the Above ExerciseSharp Notes Exercise www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part ITabFlat Notes Exercise www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part ITabTip: If you have understood the sharp and flat notes concept on one string then itis very easy for you to make out sharp and flat notes on all the other strings andfrets (or positions) on the guitar.Chapter 39 – Introduction to Guitar Scales | BuildingMajor Scales | Learning C Major ScaleScales are the building blocks in music and form the foundation of different typeof modes and chords that you will be learning in the future in this course. In thischapter you will be introduced to scales and will learn how to build a Major scale.The first major scale you will learn here is C Major Scale.What is a scale in Western Music?Scales can be defined as a succession of tones, consisting of the notesbelonging to a key, starting and ending with the key note. Scales are also knownas the alphabet of music.Example – Key of C MajorUnderstanding 2 Kinds of Scales 1. Diatonic Scales 2. Chromatic Scales www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part IIn western music there are 2 kinds of scales – Diatonic Scales and ChromaticScales. The diatonic scales are popularly known as a Major Scales and follow acertain pattern of whole tones and half tones or semitones. In a diatonic majorscale semitones are found between the 3rd and 4th and 7th and 8th degrees ( ornotes).A naturally occurring diatonic major scale is C Major Scale. A diatonic scale isbuilt up using 3 whole tones and 2 half tones i.e. 8 notes, arranged in thefollowing order.IMPORTANT: This is the formula for building a Major Scale in western musicW = Whole Tone (or Whole Step)H = Half Tone (or Half Step)W – W – H – W – W – W –HLearning C Major Scale on GuitarLet’s build C Major Scale using the above formula. In any scale, the first note isknown as the Key Note or Root Note. In C Major Scale, the Key Note will be C.C Major scale is the first diatonic major scale in the major scales table and is thenaturally occurring diatonic scale i.e. without any flat or sharp notes.In the below figure, we apply the Major Scale formula to derive the notes in CMajor scale, which are C- D- E- F- G- A- B- C.Note: If we talk in terms of guitar fret, a Whole Step interval means the 2 notesare one fret apart and Half Step means the 2 notes are on the adjacent frets .e.g. C to D or D to E are 1 fret apart and E to F and B to C are on the adjacentfrets. www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part IC Major Scale Notated on the StaffNames of Scale DegreesLet’s take the example of C Major Scale1st degree – C – Tonic2nd degree – D – Supertonic3rd degree – E – Mediant4th degree – F – Sub Dominant5th degree – G – Dominant6th degree – A – Sub Mediant7th degree – B – SubtonicC Major Scale on Tab www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part IChromatic Scales – Building a Chromatic Scale from C Major ScaleAs you have just learned that there are 5 Whole Tones and 2 Semitones in adiatonic scale. To build a chromatic scale if you divide the 5 whole tones intosemitones or half tones.The following figure will help you understand how the 5 whole tones have beendivided into half tones to get 12 semitones in total using a C Major Diatonic scale.Chromatic Scale Notation on the Key of CWhen you play a chromatic scale upwards sharp notes are used and whileplaying downwards the enharmonic equivalent notes or flat notes are used.That’s why you see both sharp and flat notes on the notation. www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part ITab for Chromatic Scale on C MajorPlease do check out this free chords chart that contains thousands of chords andchord shapes that you can learn, and do not forget to bookmark it, it’s really aninvaluable tool for guitar players.Guitar Scale Mastery Course – There are numerous techniques and conceptsabout scales that will help you achieve mastery over scales on the entire fretboard which Guitar Scale Mastery course has fully covered. Please click on thelink to find out more on this course.Chapter 40 – Building the 3 Principal Chords from theKey of C Major Diatonic Scale on GuitarIn the previous chapter we started off with learning scales – Diatonic andChromatic Scales – in guitar and learned how to build a major scale and how thefirst diatonic major scale i.e. C Major Scale is built.In this chapter you will learn to derive the 3 principal chords in a key and howthey are built. You will learn the 3 principal chords on the first diatonic majorscale – C Major Scale – that we learned in the previous chapter.The 3 principal chords in every key are Tonic, Sub-Dominant and Dominant.Tonic Chord – C MajorThe Tonic Chord is built on the first note or key note of any key. So if we take theexample of the C Major Diatonic Scale, the Tonic Chord will be C Chord.Please check out the different shapes of C Major Chord www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part ITab Notation of C Major Chord www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part ISub-Dominant Chord – F MajorThe Sub Dominant Chord is built on the 4th note or degree of any key above theTonic. In the scale of C Major, the 4th note above the Tonic is F (C-D-E-F), so Fchord is the Sub-Dominant chord.Please check out the different shapes of F Major ChordTab Notation of F Major Chord www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part IDominant Chord – G7The Dominant Chord is built on the 5th note/degree above the Tonic. So, in thescale of C Major, the 5th note/degree above the Tonic is G(C-D-E-F-G), and thedominant chord is G7 or also known as G Dominant 7th (G Dom 7) Chord. Nowyou must be wondering why G7th? right? That’s only because the dom. 7th chordsounds pleasing to our ears in the I – IV – V (i.e. Tonic, Sub-Dominant,Dominant) chord progression in a scale than a G Major chord. You can play it outand find out for yourself.One of the reasons for using a 7th as the dminant chord is this, during the chordprogression, after the listener hears the Dominant 7th Chord, he will have anatural tendency to hear a sound that resolves to the tonic or root chord (in caseof C Major Scale it is C Major Chord), which is then satisfied by playing the CChord again.While building a Dominant 7th Chord, the root is G and not C. So if you count the7th note from G, you get the F note, add it to the G Major Triad and you get a GDom. 7th Chord. You can also build a dominant 7th chord by lowering the 7thdegree of a Major scale starting at dominant degree(in this case G) a halfstep(flattening). By flattening the 7th degree of a G Major scale we get a naturalF Note.So, the formula for building a Dominant 7th Chord from a Major scale is 1-3-5-b7i.e a Major Triad(1-3-5) plus a Minor 7th note(b7).7th Chords are excessively used in Blues and Jazz chord progressions. These7th chords give that bluesy feel to a blues song.Please check out the different shapes of G7 Chord www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part ITab Notation for G7 ChordFormula for Building a Major ChordThere is a very simple formula for building a Major Chord from any key. A MajorChord is built by placing 2 Thirds, A Major Third and Minor Third placed one overthe other.Formula for Building a Major Chord = Major Third + Minor Third = MajorTriadWhere,Major Third = 2 Whole TonesMinor Third = Whole Tone + Half ToneSo if we have to build a C Major Chord from the Key of C i.e. C-D-E-F-G-A-B-CMajor Third = C to D (Whole Tone) + D to E(Whole Tone) = C to E = 2 WholeTonesMinor Third = E to F(Half Tone) + F to G (Whole Tone) = Whole Tone and HalfTone = E to G = 1 ½ Tones www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part IAnd, we get a C Major Triad (or the C Major Chord) è C – E – G , so the 3 notesof a C Major Chord is C,E and G.Please do check out this free chords chart that contains thousands of chords andchord shapes that you can learn, and do not forget to bookmark it, it’s really aninvaluable tool for guitar players.Chapter 41 – Practicing the Principal Chords and Scalein the Key of C on GuitarIn the previous chapter we learned how to build the Tonic, Sub-dominant andDominant Chords on any key and learned how to build the 3 principal chords onthe key of C.In this chapter I have 3 interesting exercises for you that will allow you to practicethe 3 principal chords – Tonic, Sub-Dominant and Dominant chords, *Arpeggiosand the C Major scale itself.*Arpeggios – playing out the notes of a chord individually.Practice TipsYou must always practice in a tempo that you are comfortable with and thengradually increase the speed. Don’t hurry up and try to push yourself to the limit,it will only make your playing sloppy.Guitar Tuner - It’s good to buy a simple guitar tuner from a music store that willhelp you tune your guitar with ease and keep it in perfect tuning.Metronome - Metronome is a small device that emits a ticking sound on aregular interval based on a preset Beats-Per-Minute (BPM) setting. It is reallyhelpful and highly recommended to practice the exercises with a metronome. Itmakes your playing more streamlined and perfect by forcing you to stay in thepreset BPM. By the way, there is no need to go for a complex metronome; asimple one would be just fine. It is also better to buy one that produces a Tickingor Clicking sound rather than the Beeps which becomes really irritating later onwhile practicing.Exercise 1 – Practicing the 3 Principal Chords www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part IDifferent shapes of the 3 principal chordsC Major ChordF Major ChordG7th ChordSlash Notation of ChordsChords can also be notated in the form of slashes instead of the regularnotations. This allows the musician to fill the bar in any way he wants in that timesignature. It is also called comping. www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part IExercise 2 – Practicing Arpeggios of the 3 Principal Chords www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part Iwww.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part IExercise 3 – Practicing the Scale www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part IPlease do check out this free chords chart that contains thousands of chords andchord shapes that you can learn, and do not forget to bookmark it, it’s really aninvaluable tool for guitar players.Chapter 42 – Learning A Natural Minor Scale and it’s 3Principal Chords on GuitarIn the previous chapter we covered 3 different exercises – using the 3 principalchords and the scale itself – using the first diatonic major scale i.e. C MajorScale. In this chapter we will learn the relative minor scale of C Major Scale andthe 3 principal chords in that scale.Relative Minor ScaleA Relative Minor scale is built on the 6th degree or note of a major scale and itshares the same notes as it’s parent Major scale. In the case of C Major Scale,the 6th degree (C-D-E-F-G-A) or note is A, so the relative minor scale of C MajorScale is A Minor. The specialty of A Natural Minor scale is that it doesn’t haveany sharp or flat notes in the scale. www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part IIt is interesting to note that there is only one type of Major Scale in western musicthat is a Major Diatonic Scale and all major scales follow the same tonal patternof a Diatonic Scale, but there are 5 different types of minor scales in westernmusic – Natural, Harmonic, Melodic, Mixed or Combined and Hungarian(Gypsy). But in this chapter we will only learn the Natural Minor Scale. The restwill be covered in the future chapters.First we will check out the formula for building a natural minor scale and then wewill see the notes in that scale.W => Whole ToneH => Half ToneFormula for building natural minor scales is W-H-W-W-H-W-WA Natural Minor Scale (as per the above formula)From the above notation you can learn the tonal intervals on the A Natural MinorScale as per the formula.A – B is a Whole ToneB – C is a Half ToneC – D is a Whole ToneD – E is a Whole ToneE – F is a Half ToneF – G is a Whole Tone www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part IG – A is a Whole ToneTab for A Natural Minor ScaleThe 3 Principal Chords in “A” Natural Minor ScaleYou can refer to Chapter 40 to see how you can build the 3 principal chords –Tonic, Sub-Dominant and Dominant Chords – from a scale as well as building aMajor Chord from it.Formula for Building a Minor Chord - Any Minor chord can be built by placinga Minor Third over a Major Third.The 3 Principal Chords on the scale of Natural A Minor are A Minor (Am), DMinor (Dm) and E7Am Chord www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part ITab for Am ChordPlease do check out the different shapes of Am Chord www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part IDm Chord www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part ITab for Dm ChordPlease do check out the different shapes of Dm ChordE7 Chord www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part ITab for E7 ChordPlease do check out the different shapes of E7 ChordChapter 43 – Practicing the 3 Principal Chords and ANatural Minor Scale on GuitarIn the previous chapter we checked out the A Natural Minor scale and the 3Principal Chords on that scale. In this chapter there are 3 exercises that will helpyou practice the 3 principal chords and the notes of that key.Practice Tip • When you are practicing the chords it’s recommended to use UP and DOWN strokes while you strum the chords. For that keep your right shoulder, elbow and wrist loose enough to get that easy up and down motion for strumming www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part I • Always focus on control and never be in a hurry to speed up your exercise. Speed will easily follow when you have full control over a riff or an exercise. The control comes through slow, systematic and regular practice. • Playing along with a Metronome is highly beneficial and will transform you a streamlined and perfect guitarist. A simple metronome is enough for you to practice, but ensure that it produces a clicking sound than Beeps.Exercise of the 3 Principal Chords www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part IDifferent Shapes of these 3 Chords on the Fret-BoardAm ChordDm ChordE7 Chord www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part IArpeggio Exercise www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part Iwww.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part IExercise of the Scale www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part IChapter 44 – Importance of Understanding Differenttypes of Musical Intervals in a Scale while LearningGuitarIn the previous chapter we checked out 3 important exercises on the A NaturalMinor Scale for practicing the 3 principal chords in that scale as well as the scaleitself on your guitar.In this chapter you will learn about musical intervals and how to identify theseintervals on any scale. Every scale and chord in western music is built ondifferent combinations of these intervals. Understanding musical intervals is very www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part Iimportant as part of your guitar learning venture that will easily enable you tounderstand and build different types of chords on the fly – without depending onany diagrams.Musical IntervalAn Interval in western music can be defined as the difference of pitch or tonebetween 2 notes. The scales and chords are formed by the combination ofdifferent notes having different pitches or tonal difference, just like a word isformed of syllables. An interval can also be defined as the tonal differencebetween two notes.E.g. C to D is a Whole Tone, C to E is a Whole Tone and E to F is a Semi-ToneFirst we will check out the intervals in general on a scale and then we will go indepth and check out the 4 main types of intervals in music i.e. Major, Minor,Diminished and Augmented. We will also check out Consonant and Dissonantintervals.We will learn the intervals with the help of the first diatonic major scale i.e. CMajor Scale.The following notation figure shows you the actual intervals between the root ortonic note (i.e. C) to the other degrees in C Major Scale. If you can refer back tothe C Major Scale chapter by clicking on the above link or the link given at thebottom of this chapter, you will understand these intervals much clearly.Note: The word Unison or Prime mean that the tonal difference between the twonotes is Zero or both the notes are the same. 2nd indicates that D is the 2nddegree or note on the scale, 3rd indicates that E is the 3rd degree or note and soon. www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part ITab4 Main Types of Intervals in Music – Major, Minor, Diminished andAugmentedIn this section we will learn the 3rd and 5th of Major, Minor, Diminished andAugmented intervals. You have already seen how to form a Major 3rd and Minor3rd in Chapter 40 – Building the 3 Principal Chords from the Key of C MajorDiatonic Scale on Guitar but I will still explain them here.Major 3rd Interval = 2 Whole Tones; in the figure below the interval between thefirst 2 notes i.e. C and E is 2 whole tones or whole steps, so it is a Major 3rdinterval.Minor 3rd Interval = 1 ½ Tones; the tonal difference between the 2nd set of notesi.e. C and E flat is 1 ½ tones or 1 Whole Tone + ½ Tone, hence the interval is aMinor 3rd.Diminished 3rd Interval = 1 Tone; Diminishing just means that you need tolower a notes value by half a tone or step. A Diminished 3rd interval is formed byflatting a Minor 3rd interval. The interval that we get after double flatting the Enote (in the 3rd set of notes) is a whole tone or a Diminished 3rd.Augmented 3rd Interval = 2 ½ Tones; Augmenting means you need to increasea notes value by half step or tone. An Augmented 3rd Interval is formed bysharping the 2nd note in a Major 3rd.Now you can easily understand the 5th of these intervals from the figure below. www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part ITabConsonant IntervalsA Consonance is a combination of tones with respect to the tonic degree or theroot note in a scale having a definite relationship with each other that soundspleasant to our ears and doesn’t have a tendency to resolve to another note.The Perfect Consonant Intervals are the same as the general intervals on ascale. Refer to the first section (Musical Intervals) of this chapter.The Imperfect Consonant Intervals evoke a small amount of tension, whenheard. Please listen to it to find out.Major 6th = the interval between the root note and the 6th note on a scale.Minor 6th = the interval between the root note and the flatted 6th note on a scale. www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part ITabDissonant IntervalsA Dissonance is a combination of tones with respect to the tonic degree or theroot note in a scale having a definite relationship with each other that soundstensed to our ears and have a strong tendency to resolve into a consonance.Please listen to it to find out.Major 2nd Interval = There is an interval of 1 Whole Tone between the root noteand the second note.Minor 2nd Interval = There is an interval of ½ Tone between the root note andthe second note.Major 7th Interval = interval between the root note and the 7th note in a scale.Minor 7th Interval = interval between the root note and the flatted 7th note inscale.Augmented Prime or Aug. Unison Interval = the second note in that set issharped, in this case C Sharp. www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part IAugmented 2nd = the 2nd note in the scale is sharped to get an Aug. 2nd interval.Augmented 4th = the 4th note in the scale is sharped to get an Aug. 4th interval.Augmented 5th = the 5th note in the scale is sharped to get an Aug. 5th interval.Augmented 6th = the 6th note in the scale is sharped to get an Aug. 6th interval.TabPlease do check out this free chords chart that contains thousands of chords andchord shapes that you can learn, and do not forget to bookmark it, it’s really aninvaluable tool for guitar players.Chapter 45 – Understanding Different Types of MinorScales in Western Music while Learning GuitarIn Chapter 42 we learned how to build a Natural Minor scale with the help of therelative minor scale of C Major Scale which is A Natural Minor. In this chapter Iam going to elaborate on the different types of Minor Scales mentioned inChapter 42 – Harmonic, Melodic, Mixed or Combined and Hungarian MinorScales with the help of A Natural Minor scale itself. www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part IHarmonic Minor ScaleHarmonic Minor Scale was born when musicians felt that the interval betweenleading 7th note and the Tonic 8th note was not pleasant enough for the humanears as they were more used to listening to a half step interval between the 7thand 8th note as on a Major Scale. So the 7th note or the leading tone of a naturalminor scale was raised a half step and called it a Harmonic Minor Scale.In the scale of A Natural Minor, the 7th note G was raised a half step to G Sharp.The raised leading tone or 7th note is called an “Accidental” as the Sharp is notindicated as part of the scale or signature and is placed only before individualnotes. So, if the 7th note is natural in the signature then the accidental is a sharpand if the 7th note is a flat in the signature, then the accidental is a natural or ifthe 7th note is a sharp in the signature, then the accidental is a double sharp.Harmonic Minor scale is the same while descending.TabMelodic Minor ScaleMelodic minor scale shares the same tonal intervals of a major scale with a smalldifference. It differs from a major scale because the half step interval occursbetween the 2nd and 3rd degrees of the scale instead of 3rd and 4th. This form ofthe minor scale is extremely pleasant to hear.The descending notes of a Melodic Minor scale are natural. www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part ITabMixed or Combined Minor ScaleMixed or Combined Minor scale is a melodic minor while ascending andharmonic minor scale while descending.Tab www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part IHungarian or Gypsy Minor ScaleHungarian Minor Scale is formed by raising the 4th degree of a Harmonic MinorScale by a half step. There are 2 one and a half step intervals in this scale, onebetween the 3rd and 4th degrees and the other between 7th and 8th degrees. Thisscale is the same while ascending and descending.Harmonic and Melodic minor scales are the favorite scales amongst mostmusicians and guitarists.TabPlease do check out this free chords chart that contains thousands of chords andchord shapes that you can learn, and do not forget to bookmark it, it’s really aninvaluable tool for guitar players.Chapter 46 – Learning G Major Scale and it’s 3 PrincipalChords on GuitarIn this chapter we will learn G Major Scale and it’s 3 principal chords – G Major,C Major and D7th – on guitar. G is at a perfect fifth interval from the note C.The first major diatonic scale that we learned was C Major Scale, which is theonly naturally occurring scale in western music (with no sharps or flats). We alsolearned it’s relative minor scale which is A Minor Scale along with it’s principalchords in one of the previous chapters. www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part IUnderstanding G Major ScaleFirst let’s learn the G Major scale. This is the second Major scale that you willlearn in western music.We have already learned the formula for building a Major Scale which is W-W-H-W-W-W-HSo, if we apply this scale formula, G Major scale should begin with the key notei.e. G on the 6th string 3rd fret or on the open 3rd string G and played all the wayup to the 1st string G note with a half step raised F note i.e. F#And we get the G Major scale notes as G A B C D E F# GG Major Scale Notation with Tab3 Principal Chords in this scaleThe 3 principal chords in G Major scale are G Major (Tonic), C Major(SubDominant) and D7(Dominant). www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part IG Major Chord Fret diagram, Notation with TabPlease check out these different chord shapes of G Major Chord on thefretboard.C Major ChordPlease refer to chapter 39 for this chord. You can check out the different shapesof C Major Chord and how they are played on the fretboard. www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part ID7 Chord Fret diagram, Notation with TabPlease check out the different ways that D7 chord can be played on thefretboard.Please practice this scale in ascending and descending order as well asstrumming the chords. Start out slowly and don’t hurry up – you will gain speedand control naturally .In the next chapter you will have some practice exercises for the chords and thescale. Till then enjoy playing the scale and chords. Meanwhile you can check outthis chords chart that contains thousands of chords and chord shapes that youcan learn. Believe me it’s an awesome and invaluable tool that every guitaristmust have, so bookmark it. www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part IChapter 47 – Exercises of Principal Chords and Scale onthe Key of G Major on GuitarIn the previous chapter we checked out the G Major Scale and the 3 principalchords on guitar. In this chapter you have 3 exercises to practice those chordsand the scale.The first exercise will get you started with the strumming of the 3 principal chordson this scale, the second one is an arpeggio exercise which will teach you toarpeggiate the chords’ notes and the third one is for practicing the scale notes ina particular pattern.Important: Please listen to these exercises first – to get an idea and then startpracticing.Practice these exercises in slow speed and gradually increase the tempo. I wouldhighly recommend using a metronome which will streamline your playing. Youcan try out this free online Metronome to start with.By the way you can think of different patterns and improvise these exercises asper your creativity. www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part IChords ExerciseDifferent Chord Shapes of these 3 Principal ChordsG Major ChordC Major ChordD7th Chord www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part IArpeggio Exercise www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part IScale Exercise www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part IPlease do check out this free chords chart that contains thousands of chords andchord shapes that you can learn, and do not forget to bookmark it, it’s really avaluable tool for guitarists.Chapter 48 – Understanding the 3 Different Patterns of CMajor Scale on the Guitar Fret-BoardThis chapter will teach you how to find out and play the C Major Scale ondifferent positions of the fret-board, in different patterns. The key to findingdifferent patterns of the same scale on the fret-board is to have a basicunderstanding of the tonal intervals which I have covered in one of the earlierchapters. But here I am again going to explain the tonal intervals in brief for yourconvenience.I am using the notes from A to A (as seen in the above fig.) to explain you thetonal intervals with respect to the guitar fret-board. As you already know that theintervals between B to C and E to F are semi-tones or half steps which meanthese notes are on adjacent frets on the fret-board and the intervals between allthe other notes are a whole tone or a whole step which means that these notesare one fret apart. Please check out the positions of these notes on the guitar fretboard in the following diagram.Tip: Please note that the 12th fret is one octave above the open string or has thehigh pitch note of the open string. If you check out the following fret diagram youwill understand that the 12th fret with 2 dotted inlays is also a G.Now it must be crystal clear for you, how the tonal intervals get interpreted intothe frets on the fret-board.1st PatternLet’s check out the first pattern of C Major Scale. The patterns are colored inRED. www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part IIf you apply your tonal interval knowledge on the 6th string (E) you will find outthat the 8th fret is a C and you can build a C Major scale by making it the rootnote. That’s how you can build the 1st pattern of C Major Scale.So all I have to say is that, get your tonal interval knowledge clear and you willrealize that finding out notes on the fret-board will be a cake walk for you.2nd patternThis is how you can build another pattern of the same notes of C Major Scale onthe fret-board.This is how the 2nd combination of notes of C Major Scale can be arranged onthe fret-board. Here I am again starting with the C note on the 8th fret on the 6thString (E), but most of the other notes are on a lower pitch unlike the previouspattern.3rd PatternThe 3rd pattern (starting on the 3rd fret of 5th string, same as the standard CMajor Scale pattern) would be more difficult to play than the previous ones, but itdefinitely teaches you how to play a scale by utilizing the maximum number offrets or length of the fret-board. Practicing scales in this way can definitely makeyou a better guitarist by learning to utilize the entire fret-board than getting lockedup in a single position. www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part IThis pattern will give you more options for incorporating different shreddingtechniques like hammer-ons, legato(sliding), tapping, bending and so on intoyour solos as well as while practicing a scale and will also give you more roomfor creating soulful and fluid sounding solos, riffs and licks.In the next chapter I will come up with some practice exercises on these patterns,till then keep practicing these scale patterns, if possible with a metronome (highlyrecommended).Chapter 49 – C Major Scale Exercises & LearningDifferent Kinds of Scales of the C FamilyIn this chapter I have 2 great exercises to familiarize C Major Scale as well as allthe important scales belonging to the C Family. The scales I have covered hereare C Natural Minor, C Harmonic Minor, C Melodic Minor, C Major Pentatonic, CMinor Pentatonic and C blues Scale.I have given two practice exercises on C Major Scale which starts on the 8th fretof the 6th string. The tab notations and audio will help you learn and play theseexercises with much ease. So make the maximum out of them. Start out slowlyand which will gradually increase your speed, dexterity and finger strength withthese exercises. These are great exercises for improving your speed.Note: Though I have written the notations in quarter notes, you can play it in thespeed of 8th, 16th or 32nd notes when you develop the speed. www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part IExercise 1 www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part IExercise 2C Natural Minor ScaleAs we have already learned how to build a minor scale in Chapter 42 –Learning A Natural Minor Scale and it’s 3 Principal Chords on Guitar . Youmay please refer to it to learn how to build a minor scale.So if you build the notes based on that formula we get the notes of C NaturalMinor Scale as C-D-E Flat-F-G-A Flat-B Flat-C. There are 3 Flat notes in the Keyof C Minor – E Flat, A Flat and B Flat. Please listen and practice the scale as perthe following notation. www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part IAlso practice this scale on 2 other positions on the fret board as shown below,Position 2 www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part IPosition 3Please check out this link to learn all the chords that belong to the CFamily. Bookmark it, it’s really valuable !C Harmonic Minor ScalePlease refer to Chapter 45 – Understanding Different Types of Minor Scalesin Western Music while Learning Guitar to learn how to build Harmonic MinorScale and Melodic Minor scales.Based on the Harmonic Minor formula we get the notes of C Harmonic MinorScale as C-D-E Flat-F-G-A Flat-B-C. The notes of a Harmonic Minor Scale arethe same while ascending and descending. www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part IC Melodic Minor ScaleSo based on the Melodic Minor Scale formula, the notes of a C Melodic Minorscale are C-D-E Flat-F-G-A-B-C. You can practice these scales using the samepatterns as the C Major Scale as shown in the beginning of this chapter as wellas other patterns using your creativity.Major Pentatonic ScalePentatonic scales are the most popular scales among guitarists and are widelyused in Rock, Jazz, Heavy Metal and Blues. They are also widely used inBluegrass and Country music“Penta” means 5, so a Pentatonic Scale has only 5 notes unlike a regular scale.This scale is derived from it’s corresponding Major scale by omitting the 4th and7th degree notes from a Major scale.The formula for building a Major Pentatonic Scale is R 2 3 5 6C Major Pentatonic ScaleBased on the above formula, we get the notes of C Major Pentatonic Scale as CDEGAIf you can refer to the previous chapter you will be able to play this scale onvarious positions of the fret-board. www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part IMinor Pentatonic ScaleMinor Pentatonic Scales can be derived from their corresponding Major scales byflattening the 3rd and 7th degree notes and omitting 2nd and 6th degree notes.The formula for building a Minor Pentatonic Scale is R b3 4 5 b7C Minor Pentatonic ScaleBased on the above formula, we get the notes of C Minor Pentatonic Scale as C-E(flat)-F- G-B(flat) www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part IBlues ScaleBlues scale has is derived from a Minor Pentatonic Scale by adding a flattened5th degree note. So a blues scale has 6 notes.Hence the formula for building a Blues Scale is R b3 4 b5 5 b7C Blues ScaleBased on the above formula, we get the notes of C Blues Scale as C-E(flat)-F-G(Flat)-G-B(flat)Practice all these scales thoroughly in various patterns as per your creativity.Play around with these scales and understand the difference between theirsounds and their mood. Major scales will have a happy mood whereas Minorscales have a tensed, bluesy tone. Understanding this difference is veryimportant. In course of time you will be able to make out what type of scale it isby just listening to them.Chapter 50 – C Major, Minor Pentatonic and BluesScales on a Different Position on GuitarIn the previous chapter we checked out 2 exercises on C Major Scale starting onthe 8th Fret position of 6th String as well as other scales belonging to the Cfamily. In this chapter you will learn to play C Major, Minor Pentatonic and Bluesscales starting on the 8th fret of 6th string. I have also prepared 2 exercises forthe major and minor pentatonic scales starting on that position. www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part ILearning to play these scales on this position will make it much easier for you tocreate solos, riff and licks using these scales.You can practice these scales up and down the fret board using the same scalesas well as interchanging the scales. for e.g. you can play C Major PentatonicScale while coming down the fret board and play the C Minor Pentatonic Scalewhile coming up with and without using the blues note and vice-versa. In fact www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part Ithere are are several combinations in which you can practice these scales. Bythe way the following exercises will ignite your creativity for finding out differentpatterns for practicing these scales.The blues note gives that ‘bluesy’ feel to the pentatonic scale. In fact any othernote that doesn’t belong to the minor pentatonic scale cane be called a bluesnote. Minor Pentatonic scales are the most widely used scales in blues, bluesrock, rock and heavy metal. www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part Iwww.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part IPractice these 2 exercises till you gain enough speed and control over them.Think of different combinations of playing these scales, like while going down thefret-board play the pattern for major pentatonic and while coming up play the www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part Iminor pentatonic pattern and so on. Practice hard till you get total control ifpossible with a metronome.Chapter 51 – Exercises on C Major and Minor Scales in 4Patterns for Developing SpeedIn the previous chapter we checked out different types of scales of the C Familyon a different position. In this chapter I have built 4 exercises using C Major andMinor scales. By practicing these patterns you will gain speed as well as adeeper understanding of these 2 scales on different fret positions. These patternswill also help you understand the change of feel or mood when you switchbetween a Major and a Minor scale. Major scales have a more pleasant andhappy tone where as Minor scales give you a more serious or tensed tone. Youwill know what I mean once you start practicing these patterns. These patternswill be a good challenge for your left fingers as there are some cool and tricky fretchanges.Practice Tips • Practice these patterns with a metronome, if possible, which will greatly improve your timing, rhythm sense and will make you a more streamlined guitar player. You can gradually improve your speed by increasing the BPM or Beats Per Minute on the metronome. • The 1st, 3rd and 5th degrees or notes (C E and G) are the ones you need to emphasize while practicing scales or jamming on C Major Chord. The other notes are called passing tones or notes and won’t sound good (dissonant tones) with C Major Chord. The passing notes are not good enough to take off or land a solo or riff. Remember these 3 degrees (or technically known as the triad) are the degrees on which the root chord or 1st chord is built.In the 1st pattern you will play C Major Scale starting on the 8th fret of 6th stringwhile ascending and descending. www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part IIn the 2nd pattern you will play C Major Scale while going up the scale but youwill switch to C Minor Scale while coming down. The flat notes that you see arethe 3 flat notes of C Minor Scale – E flat, A Flat and B Flat. You will be playing onthe same position. This is a great exercise for building speed as well as knowingthe change in tone or mood when you switch from a Major Scale to a Minor. Youmight find it difficult initially, but you will soon get used to it. So practice hard onit.Please watch the videos to get an idea on the fingering. www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part IIn the 3rd pattern you will play the C Major Scale in two different fret positionswhile going up the scale and while coming down. When you come down thescale you will make use of the higher frets.In the 4th pattern you will be playing C Major Scale while going up the scalestarting on the 8th fret of 6th string and will be switching over to C Minor Scaleusing the higher frets while coming down. This pattern might be more challengingthan previous 3 patterns, so practice hard. Believe me its well worth your efforts! www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part IChapter 52 – Learning to play the A Natural Minor Scalein Different Patterns on GuitarIn the previous chapter we checked out 4 different patterns using C Major and CMinor Scales to develop speed and synchronization of hands. In this chapter wewill check out how we can play the A Natural Minor scale in 4 different patterns(on 2 different positions).The first pattern uses the lower frets to form the A Natural Minor scale. Practicethis scale up and down. The emphasis should be given to the 1st 3rd and 5thdegrees of the scale. i.e. A, C and E notes.The second pattern starts on the same position but uses the higher frets to formthe A Natural minor scale. www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part IThe third pattern is a bit different. In this pattern you need to slide your indexfinger from 5th to 7th fret on the 5th string and from 7th to 9th fret on the 4th string.This pattern uses a linear motion on the fret board and uses the maximumnumber of frets on the 4th and 5th strings.The fourth pattern starts on a different position on the fret board, i.e. on the 12thfret of the 5th string and it follows the same pattern as the regular A Natural MinorScale which starts on the 5th open string (A). www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part IIn the next chapter I will be coming up with different scales of the A Family, i.e. AMajor, Pentatonic and Blues Scales. Till then keep practicing these patterns (ifpossible with a metronome) until you can play them fluidly in a decent speed. Inthe next step, you can think of developing more and more speed until youbecome a seasoned shredder.Chapter 53 – Learning to Play Different Type of Scales ofthe A Family on GuitarIn this chapter you will learn to play the A Major Scale in 3 different fingeringpatterns (or positions) on the fret-board as well as you will also learn A Major,Minor Pentatonic Scales on 2 different positions and also the A Blues Scale. Inthe previous chapter we checked out A Natural Minor scale on different positions.First we will check out the A Major Scale. This scale consists of 3 sharp notes –C Sharp, F Sharp and G Sharp. By the way you can play any scale on the guitarusing different combination of frets and positions on the fret board. But here I willbe showing only 3 different patterns of the A Major Scale. First you will learn theopen position notes or the original position of a scale (which will have some openstring notes).Note: All the patterns used in this chapter are in the same octave and instandard tuning – EADGBE. www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part IThe 2nd position uses a different fingering pattern and mostly utilizes the lowerfrets.The 3rd position makes use of the higher frets. www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part IThe next 3 scales that you will learn in the A Family are A Major Pentatonic,Minor Pentatonic and Blues scales. I have described about these scales in detailin one of the previous chapters – “C Major Practice Exercises & LearningDifferent Kinds of Scales of the C Family”. You may check out this chapter tolearn the formula to build them.Now you can check out how to play the A Major Pentatonic Scale on the openposition as well as on another position on the fret board, which starts on the 5thfret of the 6th string which is more suitable for playing licks and solos www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part IA Minor Pentatonic Scale is also first played on the open position and then on adifferent position perfect for soloing. www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part IThe A Blues Scale is nothing but the A Minor Pentatonic Scale with an added“blues” note (D Sharp). www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part IPractice these scale patterns up and down the fret board until you get used to thefingering as well as the mood of each scale. Please try to emphasize on the 1st,3rd and 5th notes while practice the major and minor scales, as these are thenotes which forms the major and minor chords.Here ends the first part of my beginner guitar course.2nd PartDon’t forget to collect the 2nd part of this eBook by signing up to my email listherePlease do check out my guitar blog for new lessons and guitar tips. So keeppracticing all the concepts and exercises given in this part of the course and havefun. And also please do share this course with anyone interested in learningguitar.Feedback and CommentsPlease send in your queries, comments and feedback atinfo@onlineguitarschools.comRecommended Guitar Learning Resources • JamPlay • Gibson’s Learn and Master Guitar • Jamorama www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog
    • Deepak’s Guitar Blog – Beginner Guitar Course Part I• Guitar Scale Mastery System by Craig Bassett• Riff Master Pro – This software slows down the fastest and most difficult guitar solos and riffs for you to learn them easily. www.onlineguitarschools.com/guitarblog