HOW TO PUBLICIZE E LEARNING TECHNOLOGY FOR DISASTER PREVENTION EDUCATION

  • 987 views
Uploaded on

HOW TO PUBLICIZE E LEARNING TECHNOLOGY FOR DISASTER PREVENTION EDUCATION …

HOW TO PUBLICIZE E LEARNING TECHNOLOGY FOR DISASTER PREVENTION EDUCATION

For further information: www.ztscompany.com

More in: Education , Technology
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
987
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0

Actions

Shares
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
2

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide
  • is a type of ‘technology supported education/learning’ (TSL) where the medium of instruction is through computer technology, particularly involving digital technologies. E-learning has been defined as " pedagogy empowered by digital technology“. In some instances, no face- to- face interaction takes place. E-learning is used interchangeably in a wide variety of contexts The e-Learning has the potential to transform the way we learn and to provide accessible, relevant and high-quality learning opportunities so that every user can achieve their potential. This relies on the education community sharing knowledge and understandings of the effective use of e-learning to extend and enrich educational experiences across the curriculum. Basically, the three main functions of e-learning were processed; create, deliver and measure XXX.
  • is a type of ‘technology supported education/learning’ (TSL) where the medium of instruction is through computer technology, particularly involving digital technologies. E-learning has been defined as " pedagogy empowered by digital technology“. In some instances, no face- to- face interaction takes place. E-learning is used interchangeably in a wide variety of contexts The e-Learning has the potential to transform the way we learn and to provide accessible, relevant and high-quality learning opportunities so that every user can achieve their potential. This relies on the education community sharing knowledge and understandings of the effective use of e-learning to extend and enrich educational experiences across the curriculum. Basically, the three main functions of e-learning were processed; create, deliver and measure XXX.
  • is a type of ‘technology supported education/learning’ (TSL) where the medium of instruction is through computer technology, particularly involving digital technologies. E-learning has been defined as " pedagogy empowered by digital technology“. In some instances, no face- to- face interaction takes place. E-learning is used interchangeably in a wide variety of contexts The e-Learning has the potential to transform the way we learn and to provide accessible, relevant and high-quality learning opportunities so that every user can achieve their potential. This relies on the education community sharing knowledge and understandings of the effective use of e-learning to extend and enrich educational experiences across the curriculum. Basically, the three main functions of e-learning were processed; create, deliver and measure XXX.
  • Importance of e-Learning Involving Disaster Prevention Education * Hyogo Framework for Action 2005-2015 Building the Resilience of Nations and Communities to Disasters . Specific gaps and challenges are identified in the following five main areas: (a) Governance: organizational, legal and policy frameworks; (b) Risk identification, assessment, monitoring and early warning;c) Knowledge management and education;(d) Reducing underlying risk factors; e) Preparedness for effective response and recovery * School administrators and teachers are at the nexus of all of our hopes and expectations for education as well as for disaster prevention education. As governments struggle to meet the Millennium Development Goal of “Education for All”, the challenges to develop strategies, policies and resources needed to train teachers to meet the demands of the 21st century are daunting. Expectations of what teachers should know and do are continually increasing: new content, new pedagogy and new technical tools are expected, but the resources to meet the career-long needs of teachers are lacking and teachers have limited time to spend away from classroom responsibilities. The World Education Forum in Dakar, Senegal (UNESCO, 2002) stressed the important role that distance learning and information and communication technology had to play in teacher development. (Resta, 2006). The impetus for e-learning comes from the desire to explore new ways to reach a broader audience, to adapt and improve information iteratively, moving away from costly print production of materials. (PAHO, 2004) The potential to greatly expand the reach of disaster reduction education through electronic distribution has been acknowledged by researchers (Rubin, 2003) through projects as diverse as the World Bank’s (whose online Disaster Management Training Program uses a blended learning approach) and American Red Cross’s Masters of Disaster (which delivers downloadable activities for use in both traditional classroom settings and at home, relying on teacher-student or parent-child interaction). The chief reasons for exploring e-learning cited in the extensive literature on the subject are to: improve quality of learning, improve access to education, reduce the costs of education and improve cost-effectiveness. (Waight et. al. 2004) The advantages of e-learning compared with traditional classroom instruction for disaster prevention education is particularly significant for a country. E-learning: Reduces demand for specially-trained instructors Reduces cost of instructional delivery Reduces environmental impact (avoiding travel, reduction of paper usage) Self-paced learning accommodates for learner diversity (learning styles, location, experience, skills, language and learning pace). Permits self-scheduling for learner convenience Enables large-scale distribution over wide geographic area. Online education has become a popular means of instructional delivery. Many studies in the west have assessed teacher and student attitudes and perceptions with academic leaders and students alike, rating e-learning highly. Self-paced independent study is most common and popular in the private sector where positive impacts have been measured in performance, and cost benefits are consistently recorded (Strother, 2002). Barriers to e-learning development identified in the research literature include: Cost of implementation Long lead-time for development Skepticism about effectiveness Numerous studies compare online to traditional classroom performance. The effectiveness of e-learning is born out by research. In a comprehensive research bibliography Russell (1999) found “The No Significant Difference Phenomenon” that learning seems stable no matter what medium is used for delivery (with or without face-to-face interaction). A study of teachers in nearby Northern Cyprus provided training in use of online learning. Overall teachers recorded positive attitudes to online learning. The younger the teacher the more they exhibited positive attitudes to online learning. Teachers in urban schools had more positive attitudes than rural teachers. And teachers who used email and teachers who regularly use web pages had more positive attitudes than those who did not. (Uzunboylu, H. 2007). Factors found to interfere with e-learning are: Lack of computer skills Lack of computer at home Feeling of isolation due to absence of face-to-face. Requires self-discipline and self-motivation. In spite of the obvious barrier of inequalities in access to information and communication technology (computers and internet connections) online learning is being pursued vigorously throughout the developing world. The “Green Teacher” is being developed in India to face challenges of large numbers of teachers to be trained, heterogeneity in the learner group, cultural diversity and limited resources. There are similar efforts in Africa where information and communication technology infrastructure is extremely limited.
  • Importance of e-Learning Involving Disaster Prevention Education School administrators and teachers are at the nexus of all of our hopes and expectations for education as well as for disaster prevention education. As governments struggle to meet the Millennium Development Goal of “Education for All”, the challenges to develop strategies, policies and resources needed to train teachers to meet the demands of the 21st century are daunting. Expectations of what teachers should know and do are continually increasing: new content, new pedagogy and new technical tools are expected, but the resources to meet the career-long needs of teachers are lacking and teachers have limited time to spend away from classroom responsibilities. The World Education Forum in Dakar, Senegal (UNESCO, 2002) stressed the important role that distance learning and information and communication technology had to play in teacher development. (Resta, 2006). The impetus for e-learning comes from the desire to explore new ways to reach a broader audience, to adapt and improve information iteratively, moving away from costly print production of materials. (PAHO, 2004) The potential to greatly expand the reach of disaster reduction education through electronic distribution has been acknowledged by researchers (Rubin, 2003) through projects as diverse as the World Bank’s (whose online Disaster Management Training Program uses a blended learning approach) and American Red Cross’s Masters of Disaster (which delivers downloadable activities for use in both traditional classroom settings and at home, relying on teacher-student or parent-child interaction). The chief reasons for exploring e-learning cited in the extensive literature on the subject are to: improve quality of learning, improve access to education, reduce the costs of education and improve cost-effectiveness. (Waight et. al. 2004) The advantages of e-learning compared with traditional classroom instruction for disaster prevention education is particularly significant for a country. E-learning: Reduces demand for specially-trained instructors Reduces cost of instructional delivery Reduces environmental impact (avoiding travel, reduction of paper usage) Self-paced learning accommodates for learner diversity (learning styles, location, experience, skills, language and learning pace). Permits self-scheduling for learner convenience Enables large-scale distribution over wide geographic area. Online education has become a popular means of instructional delivery. Many studies in the west have assessed teacher and student attitudes and perceptions with academic leaders and students alike, rating e-learning highly. Self-paced independent study is most common and popular in the private sector where positive impacts have been measured in performance, and cost benefits are consistently recorded (Strother, 2002). Barriers to e-learning development identified in the research literature include: Cost of implementation Long lead-time for development Skepticism about effectiveness Numerous studies compare online to traditional classroom performance. The effectiveness of e-learning is born out by research. In a comprehensive research bibliography Russell (1999) found “The No Significant Difference Phenomenon” that learning seems stable no matter what medium is used for delivery (with or without face-to-face interaction). A study of teachers in nearby Northern Cyprus provided training in use of online learning. Overall teachers recorded positive attitudes to online learning. The younger the teacher the more they exhibited positive attitudes to online learning. Teachers in urban schools had more positive attitudes than rural teachers. And teachers who used email and teachers who regularly use web pages had more positive attitudes than those who did not. (Uzunboylu, H. 2007). Factors found to interfere with e-learning are: Lack of computer skills Lack of computer at home Feeling of isolation due to absence of face-to-face. Requires self-discipline and self-motivation. In spite of the obvious barrier of inequalities in access to information and communication technology (computers and internet connections) online learning is being pursued vigorously throughout the developing world. The “Green Teacher” is being developed in India to face challenges of large numbers of teachers to be trained, heterogeneity in the learner group, cultural diversity and limited resources. There are similar efforts in Africa where information and communication technology infrastructure is extremely limited.
  • How to publicize of e-Learning Involving Disaster Prevention Education Creating an online disaster prevention education site for publicizing on the web is not enough on its own, just like getting a new telephone number and expecting it to ring is not realistic. To attract visitors to our website and convert them to users/students we have to market the e-learning site. In order to publicize on line / e-learning disaster prevention education, before all else, a well design publicizing and dissemination strategy is essential. The worlds of Advertising & Sales & Marketing tools are valid for publicizing of e-learning a system. Moreover, these business tools should be nicely blended with pedagogical tools for effective and sustainable publicizing of e-learning disaster prevention education.
  • Learn from others' successes. Keep an eye on your fellows, and on successful similar e-learning programs in other market sectors, regional and/or international world. Learn from what they are doing, and think about how you can adapt good ideas in appropriate ways. During adaptation process, localization and conceptualizing of a e-learning program to a specific country is vital. Links and affiliations. If you can, find similar specialist sites that cater for your particular niche and ask if they'll link to you, or put you in their search results. In return, put a link back to them. It'll improve your search engine rankings too. Alternatively, join a referral, or affiliate scheme (or set up your own) so the linking site is rewarded on results. This can offer added value to your visitors as well as boosting your traffic - it's a win-win situation. Different models and channels. The generation e-learning models and different channels are provided for target groups in order to maximize the effectiveness of the disaster prevention education. For instance, correspondence model; print material, hardcopies, multimedia model; audiotape, videotape, computer-based learning, interactive CD-Roms, TV/Radio broadcasts, tele-learning model, audio conferencing, video conferencing, flexible learning model; Internet access to resources, computer mediated communication, interactive media online. Also, If get the press interested, it's worth a fortune in marketing What's working? When it comes to publicizing, it’s a sad fact that if e-learning disaster prevention education programs have been used in limitedly. Although being creative is crucial, measuring the results and putting the next round of efforts and budget where you got the most results last time is the way to success. So measure everything you do, and try to find out where all your leads and users/students come from. Use questions on your web site to ask students how they heard about your site.
  • Aware of Planning Process Almost every e-learning needs to promote itself in some way, reaching out to users/students and potential students. E-learning System Planning Process has above components. In terms of the publicizing aspect of e-learning objectives, the components of e-learning positioning and creative strategy have been particularly elaborated under this title: The learning objectives are defined according to the e-learning ‘positioning’ and the ‘target group(s)’. Although there are different definitions of Positioning, probably the most common is: "A product's position is how potential buyers see the product". Positioning is a concept in marketing which was first popularized by Al Ries and Jack Trout in their bestseller book “Positioning – The Battle for Your Mind". In the light of the original ‘positioning’ definition, the e-learning positioning could be define like this: ‘ e-learning system’s position is how potential users/students are aware of and see the e-learning disaster prevention education.’ "Positioning: The Battle for Your Mind", in which they define Positioning as "an organized system for finding a window in the mind. It is based on the concept that communication can only take place at the right time and under the right circumstances." The learning objectives give a shape to the processes of e-learning creative strategy, dissemination and evaluation. Creative strategies are used in order to obtain users/students attention, encourage them for learning and applying of the disaster prevention content. In terms of the e-learning disaster prevention education creative strategies promote publicity and from the individual capacity building to the community based approaches. The efficient creative strategies consist of emotional and rational appeals. Emotional appeal is to psychological, social or symbolic needs. “Pull at the users/students’ heartstrings” Using of humor and fantasy are among emotional appeals. Moreover, Rational appeal is to provide information about functional and utilitarian aspects of the e-learning disaster prevention: Provide concrete supporting information education and show users/students how to avoid the disasters. (Ganesh Lyer, 2007).
  • Aware of hierarchy of effects of communication process. The hierarchy-of-effects model is predominant. It shows clear steps of how publicizing works Awareness: If most of the target audience is unaware of the disaster prevention e-learning, the first task is to build awareness, perhaps just name recognition, with simple messages repeating the e-learning program name. Users/students must become aware of the e-learning. This isn’t as straightforward as it seems. Capturing someone’s attention doesn’t mean they will notice the e-learning education name and it’s content. Thus, the e-learning education name and content needs to be made focal to get users/students to become aware. Knowledge: The target audience might have e-learning disaster prevention education awareness but not know much more; hence this stage involves creating brand /website knowledge. This is where comprehension of the website name and what it stands for become important. What are the website’s specific appeals, its benefits? Who are the target users/students? These are the types of questions that must be answered if target groups are to achieve the step of brand knowledge. Liking: If target groups know the e-learning disaster prevention education, how do they feel about it?  If the audience looks unfavorably towards the e-learning education to owner organization has to find out why.  If the unfavorable view is based on real problems, a communication campaigns alone cannot do the job.  For product/e-learning problem it is necessary to first fix the problem and only then can you communicate its renewed quality. Preference: The target group might like the e-learning but not prefer it to others; such as written materials, class training, etc.  In this case, the owner organization must try to build users preference by promoting quality, value, performance and other features.  The owner organization can check the efforts success by measuring users/target groups preference before and after the works/efforts.  Conviction: A target audience might prefer a particular product but not develop a conviction about buying it.  The communicator’s job is to build conviction among the target audience.  Action: Finally, some members of the target audience might have conviction but not quite get around to making the action.  They may wait for more information or plan to act later.  The owner organization must need these users/students to take the final step, perhaps by accompanying with a dissemination strategy, such as a cascading model. This is where target group make a move to actually search out information. Thus publicizing is thought to work and follow a certain sequence whereby the prospect is moved through a series of stages in succession from unawareness to attend the e-learning education. There is a very important point that should be highlighted here; publicizing cannot induce immediate behavioral response, rather a series of mental effects must occur with the fulfillment at each stage before progress to the next stage is possible. (Ganesh Lyer, 2007).
  • Aware of hierarchy of effects of communication process. The hierarchy-of-effects model is predominant. It shows clear steps of how publicizing works Awareness: If most of the target audience is unaware of the disaster prevention e-learning, the first task is to build awareness, perhaps just name recognition, with simple messages repeating the e-learning program name. Users/students must become aware of the e-learning. This isn’t as straightforward as it seems. Capturing someone’s attention doesn’t mean they will notice the e-learning education name and it’s content. Thus, the e-learning education name and content needs to be made focal to get users/students to become aware. Knowledge: The target audience might have e-learning disaster prevention education awareness but not know much more; hence this stage involves creating brand /website knowledge. This is where comprehension of the website name and what it stands for become important. What are the website’s specific appeals, its benefits? Who are the target users/students? These are the types of questions that must be answered if target groups are to achieve the step of brand knowledge. Liking: If target groups know the e-learning disaster prevention education, how do they feel about it?  If the audience looks unfavorably towards the e-learning education to owner organization has to find out why.  If the unfavorable view is based on real problems, a communication campaigns alone cannot do the job.  For product/e-learning problem it is necessary to first fix the problem and only then can you communicate its renewed quality. Preference: The target group might like the e-learning but not prefer it to others; such as written materials, class training, etc.  In this case, the owner organization must try to build users preference by promoting quality, value, performance and other features.  The owner organization can check the efforts success by measuring users/target groups preference before and after the works/efforts.  Conviction: A target audience might prefer a particular product but not develop a conviction about buying it.  The communicator’s job is to build conviction among the target audience.  Action: Finally, some members of the target audience might have conviction but not quite get around to making the action.  They may wait for more information or plan to act later.  The owner organization must need these users/students to take the final step, perhaps by accompanying with a dissemination strategy, such as a cascading model. This is where target group make a move to actually search out information. Thus publicizing is thought to work and follow a certain sequence whereby the prospect is moved through a series of stages in succession from unawareness to attend the e-learning education. There is a very important point that should be highlighted here; publicizing cannot induce immediate behavioral response, rather a series of mental effects must occur with the fulfillment at each stage before progress to the next stage is possible. (Ganesh Lyer, 2007).
  • Aware of hierarchy of effects of communication process. The hierarchy-of-effects model is predominant. It shows clear steps of how publicizing works Awareness: If most of the target audience is unaware of the disaster prevention e-learning, the first task is to build awareness, perhaps just name recognition, with simple messages repeating the e-learning program name. Users/students must become aware of the e-learning. This isn’t as straightforward as it seems. Capturing someone’s attention doesn’t mean they will notice the e-learning education name and it’s content. Thus, the e-learning education name and content needs to be made focal to get users/students to become aware. Knowledge: The target audience might have e-learning disaster prevention education awareness but not know much more; hence this stage involves creating brand /website knowledge. This is where comprehension of the website name and what it stands for become important. What are the website’s specific appeals, its benefits? Who are the target users/students? These are the types of questions that must be answered if target groups are to achieve the step of brand knowledge. Liking: If target groups know the e-learning disaster prevention education, how do they feel about it?  If the audience looks unfavorably towards the e-learning education to owner organization has to find out why.  If the unfavorable view is based on real problems, a communication campaigns alone cannot do the job.  For product/e-learning problem it is necessary to first fix the problem and only then can you communicate its renewed quality. Preference: The target group might like the e-learning but not prefer it to others; such as written materials, class training, etc.  In this case, the owner organization must try to build users preference by promoting quality, value, performance and other features.  The owner organization can check the efforts success by measuring users/target groups preference before and after the works/efforts.  Conviction: A target audience might prefer a particular product but not develop a conviction about buying it.  The communicator’s job is to build conviction among the target audience.  Action: Finally, some members of the target audience might have conviction but not quite get around to making the action.  They may wait for more information or plan to act later.  The owner organization must need these users/students to take the final step, perhaps by accompanying with a dissemination strategy, such as a cascading model. This is where target group make a move to actually search out information. Thus publicizing is thought to work and follow a certain sequence whereby the prospect is moved through a series of stages in succession from unawareness to attend the e-learning education. There is a very important point that should be highlighted here; publicizing cannot induce immediate behavioral response, rather a series of mental effects must occur with the fulfillment at each stage before progress to the next stage is possible. (Ganesh Lyer, 2007).
  • Learn from others' successes. Keep an eye on your fellows, and on successful similar e-learning programs in other market sectors, regional and/or international world. Learn from what they are doing, and think about how you can adapt good ideas in appropriate ways. During adaptation process, localization and conceptualizing of a e-learning program to a specific country is vital. Links and affiliations. If you can, find similar specialist sites that cater for your particular niche and ask if they'll link to you, or put you in their search results. In return, put a link back to them. It'll improve your search engine rankings too. Alternatively, join a referral, or affiliate scheme (or set up your own) so the linking site is rewarded on results. This can offer added value to your visitors as well as boosting your traffic - it's a win-win situation. Different models and channels. The generation e-learning models and different channels are provided for target groups in order to maximize the effectiveness of the disaster prevention education. For instance, correspondence model; print material, hardcopies, multimedia model; audiotape, videotape, computer-based learning, interactive CD-Roms, TV/Radio broadcasts, tele-learning model, audio conferencing, video conferencing, flexible learning model; Internet access to resources, computer mediated communication, interactive media online. Also, If get the press interested, it's worth a fortune in marketing What's working? When it comes to publicizing, it’s a sad fact that if e-learning disaster prevention education programs have been used in limitedly. Although being creative is crucial, measuring the results and putting the next round of efforts and budget where you got the most results last time is the way to success. So measure everything you do, and try to find out where all your leads and users/students come from. Use questions on your web site to ask students how they heard about your site.
  • Learn from others' successes. Keep an eye on your fellows, and on successful similar e-learning programs in other market sectors, regional and/or international world. Learn from what they are doing, and think about how you can adapt good ideas in appropriate ways. During adaptation process, localization and conceptualizing of a e-learning program to a specific country is vital. Links and affiliations. If you can, find similar specialist sites that cater for your particular niche and ask if they'll link to you, or put you in their search results. In return, put a link back to them. It'll improve your search engine rankings too. Alternatively, join a referral, or affiliate scheme (or set up your own) so the linking site is rewarded on results. This can offer added value to your visitors as well as boosting your traffic - it's a win-win situation. Different models and channels. The generation e-learning models and different channels are provided for target groups in order to maximize the effectiveness of the disaster prevention education. For instance, correspondence model; print material, hardcopies, multimedia model; audiotape, videotape, computer-based learning, interactive CD-Roms, TV/Radio broadcasts, tele-learning model, audio conferencing, video conferencing, flexible learning model; Internet access to resources, computer mediated communication, interactive media online. Also, If get the press interested, it's worth a fortune in marketing What's working? When it comes to publicizing, it’s a sad fact that if e-learning disaster prevention education programs have been used in limitedly. Although being creative is crucial, measuring the results and putting the next round of efforts and budget where you got the most results last time is the way to success. So measure everything you do, and try to find out where all your leads and users/students come from. Use questions on your web site to ask students how they heard about your site.
  • Learn from others' successes. Keep an eye on your fellows, and on successful similar e-learning programs in other market sectors, regional and/or international world. Learn from what they are doing, and think about how you can adapt good ideas in appropriate ways. During adaptation process, localization and conceptualizing of a e-learning program to a specific country is vital. Links and affiliations. If you can, find similar specialist sites that cater for your particular niche and ask if they'll link to you, or put you in their search results. In return, put a link back to them. It'll improve your search engine rankings too. Alternatively, join a referral, or affiliate scheme (or set up your own) so the linking site is rewarded on results. This can offer added value to your visitors as well as boosting your traffic - it's a win-win situation. Different models and channels. The generation e-learning models and different channels are provided for target groups in order to maximize the effectiveness of the disaster prevention education. For instance, correspondence model; print material, hardcopies, multimedia model; audiotape, videotape, computer-based learning, interactive CD-Roms, TV/Radio broadcasts, tele-learning model, audio conferencing, video conferencing, flexible learning model; Internet access to resources, computer mediated communication, interactive media online. Also, If get the press interested, it's worth a fortune in marketing What's working? When it comes to publicizing, it’s a sad fact that if e-learning disaster prevention education programs have been used in limitedly. Although being creative is crucial, measuring the results and putting the next round of efforts and budget where you got the most results last time is the way to success. So measure everything you do, and try to find out where all your leads and users/students come from. Use questions on your web site to ask students how they heard about your site.
  • Learn from others' successes. Keep an eye on your fellows, and on successful similar e-learning programs in other market sectors, regional and/or international world. Learn from what they are doing, and think about how you can adapt good ideas in appropriate ways. During adaptation process, localization and conceptualizing of a e-learning program to a specific country is vital. Links and affiliations. If you can, find similar specialist sites that cater for your particular niche and ask if they'll link to you, or put you in their search results. In return, put a link back to them. It'll improve your search engine rankings too. Alternatively, join a referral, or affiliate scheme (or set up your own) so the linking site is rewarded on results. This can offer added value to your visitors as well as boosting your traffic - it's a win-win situation. Different models and channels. The generation e-learning models and different channels are provided for target groups in order to maximize the effectiveness of the disaster prevention education. For instance, correspondence model; print material, hardcopies, multimedia model; audiotape, videotape, computer-based learning, interactive CD-Roms, TV/Radio broadcasts, tele-learning model, audio conferencing, video conferencing, flexible learning model; Internet access to resources, computer mediated communication, interactive media online. Also, If get the press interested, it's worth a fortune in marketing What's working? When it comes to publicizing, it’s a sad fact that if e-learning disaster prevention education programs have been used in limitedly. Although being creative is crucial, measuring the results and putting the next round of efforts and budget where you got the most results last time is the way to success. So measure everything you do, and try to find out where all your leads and users/students come from. Use questions on your web site to ask students how they heard about your site.
  • E-Learning and Pedagogy Charles Clarke who previous Minister of Education, now Home Secretary of UK states that “Institutions should take full advantage of the benefits of Information Communication Technology, both pedagogically to enhance teaching and administratively to maximize value for money” Some authors ( NewMindsets) develop the concept of “second generation” e-learning as a new paradigm for thinking about online learning. Whereas “first generation” approaches have been effective for developing technical skills, the same approach has not proven effective for developing management soft-skills (e.g. in the field of leadership education). Conclusions are drawn on the importance of taking a pedagogical, rather then a technology-driven approach for developing effective online programs for any e-learning and capacity building or performance improvement table ı: key characteristics and design principles of “first” and “second generation” e-learning FIRSTTechnology drivenLinear-sequential logic of component partsInstructor-in-controlEvaluation based on content memorization repetitive practice and “passing the test”Engagement –primarily visual, “eye catching”Separates theory and practiceSeparate systems for learning and knowledge capture / disseminationSECONDPedagogy drivenHolographic-fractal; self-organizingLearner-in-controlEvaluation based on self-assessment, reflective practice and successful applicationEngagement through provocation / hooks /ideasIntegrates theory / practice / work / learning in real-timeIntegrated learning, knowledge creation and knowledge sharingResource: Veselina Nedeva , Dimitar Nedeva, 2008, Evolution in the E-Learning Systems with Intelligent Technologies. The technologies and the methods for three generations of e-learning systems are developed in detail both theoretically and practically. In all of them the accent is put on different characteristics of the systems depending on the area of their application. A global classification is made by Connolly and Stansfield regarding the generations of e-learning systems; the stress upon the characteristics and functionality of the systems, but not on the technologies. According to Connolly and Stansfield e-learning has gone through three distinct generations. The first generation, they explain, took place from 1994-1999 and was marked by a passive use of the Internet where traditional materials were simply repurposed to an online format. The second generation took place from 2000-2003 and was marked by the transition to higher bandwidths, rich streaming media, increased resources, and the move to create virtual learning environments that incorporated access to course materials, communications, and student services. The third generation is currently underway and is marked by the incorporation of greater collaboration, socialization, project based learning, and reflective practices, through such tools as e-portfolios, wikis, blogs, social bookmarking and networking, and online simulations. Additionally, the third generation is increasingly being influenced by advances in mobile computing. In 2002 some authors already speak about 4th generation of e-learning and distance learning. According to the development of e-learning is directly connected with the development and the integration of open standards for Grids, Repositories and Networks,in the following order: First Wave: Open standards for Data Communication: The Internet Second Wave: Open standards for Data Presentation: World Wide Web Third Wave: Open standards for network-based applications: Web Services The future development according to is based on Enabling Technologies – Learning Object Repositories, Optical Networks, Grids, Web Services. (Veselina,N.,et.all,2008).
  • School administrators and teachers are at the nexus of all of our hopes and expectations for education as well as for disaster prevention education. As governments struggle to meet the Millennium Development Goal of “Education for All”, the challenges to develop strategies, policies and resources needed to train teachers to meet the demands of the 21st century are daunting. Expectations of what teachers should know and do are continually increasing: new content, new pedagogy and new technical tools are expected, but the resources to meet the career-long needs of teachers are lacking and teachers have limited time to spend away from classroom responsibilities. The World Education Forum in Dakar, Senegal (UNESCO, 2002) stressed the important role that distance learning and information and communication technology had to play in teacher development. (Resta, 2006). The impetus for e-learning comes from the desire to explore new ways to reach a broader audience, to adapt and improve information iteratively, moving away from costly print production of materials. (PAHO, 2004) The potential to greatly expand the reach of disaster reduction education through electronic distribution has been acknowledged by researchers (Rubin, 2003) through projects as diverse as the World Bank’s (whose online Disaster Management Training Program uses a blended learning approach) and American Red Cross’s Masters of Disaster (which delivers downloadable activities for use in both traditional classroom settings and at home, relying on teacher-student or parent-child interaction). The chief reasons for exploring e-learning cited in the extensive literature on the subject are to: improve quality of learning, improve access to education, reduce the costs of education and improve cost-effectiveness. (Waight et. al. 2004) The advantages of e-learning compared with traditional classroom instruction for disaster prevention education is particularly significant for a country. E-learning: Reduces demand for specially-trained instructors Reduces cost of instructional delivery Reduces environmental impact (avoiding travel, reduction of paper usage) Self-paced learning accommodates for learner diversity (learning styles, location, experience, skills, language and learning pace). Permits self-scheduling for learner convenience Enables large-scale distribution over wide geographic area. Online education has become a popular means of instructional delivery. Many studies in the west have assessed teacher and student attitudes and perceptions with academic leaders and students alike, rating e-learning highly. Self-paced independent study is most common and popular in the private sector where positive impacts have been measured in performance, and cost benefits are consistently recorded (Strother, 2002). Barriers to e-learning development identified in the research literature include: Cost of implementation Long lead-time for development Skepticism about effectiveness Numerous studies compare online to traditional classroom performance. The effectiveness of e-learning is born out by research. In a comprehensive research bibliography Russell (1999) found “The No Significant Difference Phenomenon” that learning seems stable no matter what medium is used for delivery (with or without face-to-face interaction). A study of teachers in nearby Northern Cyprus provided training in use of online learning. Overall teachers recorded positive attitudes to online learning. The younger the teacher the more they exhibited positive attitudes to online learning. Teachers in urban schools had more positive attitudes than rural teachers. And teachers who used email and teachers who regularly use web pages had more positive attitudes than those who did not. (Uzunboylu, H. 2007). Factors found to interfere with e-learning are: Lack of computer skills Lack of computer at home Feeling of isolation due to absence of face-to-face. Requires self-discipline and self-motivation. In spite of the obvious barrier of inequalities in access to information and communication technology (computers and internet connections) online learning is being pursued vigorously throughout the developing world. The “Green Teacher” is being developed in India to face challenges of large numbers of teachers to be trained, heterogeneity in the learner group, cultural diversity and limited resources. There are similar efforts in Africa where information and communication technology infrastructure is extremely limited.
  • The technologies and the methods for three generations of e-learning systems are developed in detail both theoretically and practically. In all of them the accent is put on different characteristics of the systems depending on the area of their application. A global classification is made by Connolly and Stansfield regarding the generations of e-learning systems; the stress upon the characteristics and functionality of the systems, but not on the technologies. According to Connolly and Stansfield e-learning has gone through three distinct generations. The first generation, they explain, took place from 1994-1999 and was marked by a passive use of the Internet where traditional materials were simply repurposed to an online format. The second generation took place from 2000-2003 and was marked by the transition to higher bandwidths, rich streaming media, increased resources, and the move to create virtual learning environments that incorporated access to course materials, communications, and student services. The third generation is currently underway and is marked by the incorporation of greater collaboration, socialization, project based learning, and reflective practices, through such tools as e-portfolios, wikis, blogs, social bookmarking and networking, and online simulations. Additionally, the third generation is increasingly being influenced by advances in mobile computing. In 2002 some authors already speak about 4th generation of e-learning and distance learning. According to the development of e-learning is directly connected with the development and the integration of open standards for Grids, Repositories and Networks,in the following order: First Wave: Open standards for Data Communication: The Internet Second Wave: Open standards for Data Presentation: World Wide Web Third Wave: Open standards for network-based applications: Web Services The future development according to is based on Enabling Technologies – Learning Object Repositories, Optical Networks, Grids, Web Services. (Veselina,N.,et.all,2008).
  • What is facilitation? Thinking about how to facilitate is not new. Formal facilitation began in 1950s and has evolved into various formats since then, including online facilitation. Originally, the term “facilitate” comes from the latin word ‘facilis’ which means "to do or make" and -ilis which means "easier". So in its simplest expression, a facilitator makes things easier by: sharing knowledge ; or increasing the ease of performance of any action ; actively engaging and involving the group in accomplishing objectives .

Transcript

  • 1. EPFL - UNESCO Chair International Scientific Conference on Technologies for Development 8-10 February 2010. Lausanne. Zeynep Turkmen Sanduvac Bogazici University, Disaster Management Center, Istanbul_Turkey [email_address] How to Publicize the Importance of e-Learning Technology for Disaster Prevention Education
  • 2. CONTENT
    • Basic Terms
    • Importance of e-Learning Tecnology
    • for Disaster Prevention Educatio n
    • Publicizing E-Learning
    • Disaster Prevention Education
    • E-Learning Technology and Pedagogy
    • Case Studies: E-Learning Applications in Turkey
  • 3. BASIC TERMS e-learning disaster prevention education publicizing
  • 4. e-learning
    • ‘ technology supported education/learning’ (TSL)
    • “ pedagogy empowered by digital technology“
    • accessible, relevant and high-quality learning opportunities
    • every user can achieve their potential
    • three main functions of e-learning:
    • - processed
    • - create and deliver
    • - measure
  • 5. publicizing
    • drawing public attention
    • a publicizing strategy
    • the world of Sales & Marketing
    • How to Attract Public to Our
    • Online Training
  • 6. disaster prevention
    • a trans-disciplinary exercise
    • developing knowledge, skills and values
    • responsibility for building a safer and
    • sustainable future
    • sustainable development
    • mitigation of the destructive effects of
    • disasters on people and societies
    • Education is recognized as an essential element in disaster risk reduction strategies.
  • 7. CONTENT
    • Basic Terms
    • Importance of e-Learning Technology
    • for Disaster Prevention Educatio n
    • Publicizing e-Learning Tecnology for
    • Disaster Prevention Education
    • E-Learning Technology and Pedagogy
    • Case Study: E-Learning Applications in Turkey
  • 8. IMPORTANCE OF E-LEARNING FOR DISASTER PREVENTION EDUCATION
    • Hyogo Framework for Action
    • (UN ISDR, 2005-2015 )
    • UN Millennium Development Goal of “Education for All” (2008-2015)
    • T he World Education Forum in Dakar, Senegal (UNESCO, 2002)
    • *****
    • World Bank’s Disaster Management Training Program
    • American Red Cross’s Masters of Disaster
  • 9. WHY E-LEARNING
    • Reduces demand for specially-trained instructors
    • Reduces cost of instructional delivery
    • Reduces environmental impact (avoiding travel, reduction of paper usage)
    • Self-paced learning accommodates for learner diversity (learning styles, location, experience, skills, language and learning pace)
    • Permits self-scheduling for learner convenience
    • Enables large-scale distribution over wide geographic area.
  • 10. CONTENT
    • Basic Terms
    • Importance of e-Learning Technology
    • for Disaster Prevention Educatio n
    • Publicizing e-Learning Technology
    • Disaster Prevention Education
    • E-Learning Technology and Pedagogy
    • Case Study: E-Learning Applications in Turkey
  • 11. HOW TO PUBLICIZE E-LEARNING FOR DISASTER PREVENTION EDUCATION Creating an online disaster prevention education site for publicizing is NOT enough on its own . Well design publicizing and dissemination strategies are essential .
  • 12. Learn from others' successes Links and affiliations Different models and channels What's working? Awareness of hierarchy of effects of communication process . Awareness of Planning Process Stakeholder Analysis HOW TO PUBLICIZE E-LEARNING FOR DISASTER PREVENTION EDUCATION
  • 13. HOW TO PUBLICIZE E-LEARNING Adapted from: Ganesh Lyer.Advertising Strategy.2007. Berkeley University of California E-learning System Planning Process Awareness of Planning Process E-learning System Evaluation e – Learning Objectives Creative Strategy Dissemination Strategy e-Learning Positioning Target Group
  • 14.
    • .
    HOW TO PUBLICIZE E-LEARNING Hierarchy Of Effects Of Communication Process
  • 15. HOW TO PUBLICIZE E-LEARNING
    • Hierarchy Of Effects Of Communication Process.
    Awareness Interest Liking, Preference Action Resource: Ganesh Lyer.Advertising Strategy.2007.Berkeley Univ. of California Awareness of hierarchy of effects of communication process .
  • 16. HOW TO PUBLICIZE E-LEARNING Hierarchy Of Effects Of Communication Process
    • .
  • 17.
    • WHAT IS STAKEHOLDER
    • ANALYSIS?
    • It is identifying the
    • ‘ value’ and
    • ‘ importance of’
    • Groups
    • Key Individuals and
    • Associations
    • t hat have an impact on
    • the success of
    • the e-learning definitely.
    HOW TO PUBLICIZE E-LEARNING Stakeholder Analysis What is important? How to define important ones? What points should I take into consideration?
  • 18. CLEARLY IDENTIFICATION OF ALL INDIVIDUALs and ASSOCIATIONs THAT WILL HAVE AN IMPACT ON THE E-LEARNING PROGRAM ASSOCIATIONs IDENTIFICATION WHY DO WE DO STAKEHOLDER ANALYSIS? (cont’d..)
  • 19. ASSOCIATIONs FORESEEING FORESIGHT of the IMPACT: * POSITIVE * NEGATIVE (cont’d...) WHY DO WE DO STAKEHOLDER ANALYSIS?
  • 20. ASSOCIATIONs STRATEGY
    • REDUCING/ ELIMINATING
    • BARRIERS
    * RECEIVING MOST EFFECTIVE SUPPORT WHY DO WE DO STAKEHOLDER ANALYSIS? (cont’d..)
  • 21. IMPLEMENTATION DISSEMMINATION STAKE HOLDERS INTEREST IMPACT /POWER STRATEGY RECEIVE SUPPORT ELIMINATE BARRIERS   *         **         ***         ****       IDENTIFY/ LIST -Effecting -Effected Associations DEGREE AND TYPE -Expectation -Benefit -Damage -Conflict CATEGORIZE +/- A.Very Important B.Important C.Unimportant FOCUS ON -What kind of information? -Importance of stakeholder? -Pressure and Support Groups (on this stakeholder.)
  • 22.  
  • 23. Different models and channels HOW TO PUBLICIZE E-LEARNING TECHNOLOGY FOR DISASTER PREVENTION EDUCATION Adapted: James Taylor , t he University of Southern Queensland, USQ . Generation M odel of Distance Education Correspondence Model Print Multi-media Model Audiotape, Videotape, Computer-based learning, Interactive CD-Roms, TV/Radio Broadcasts Tele-learning Model Audio - conferencing, Video - conferencing Flexible Learning Model Internet access to resources, Computer mediated communication, interactive media online
  • 24.
    • Learn from others' successes
    • Links and affiliations
    Different models and channels
    • What's working?
    Aware of hierarchy of effects of communication process . Aware of Planning Process Stakeholder Analysis HOW TO PUBLICIZE E-LEARNING FOR DISASTER PREVENTION EDUCATION
  • 25. HOW TO PUBLICIZE OF E-LEARNING FOR DISASTER PREVENTION EDUCATION
  • 26. CONTENT
    • Basic Terms
    • Importance of e-Learning Technology
    • Disaster Prevention Educatio n
    • Publicizing e-Learning for
    • Disaster Prevention Education
    • E-Learning Technology and Pedagogy
    • Case Study: E-Learning Applications in Turkey
  • 27. E-LEARNING TECHNOLOGY AND PEDAGOGY Charles Clark e, previous Minister of Education, now Home Secretary of UK “ Institutions should take full advantage of the benefits of Information Communication Technology, both pedagogically to enhance teaching and administratively to maximize value for money”
  • 28. E-LEARNING TECHNOLOGY AND PEDAGOGY _continue Key Characteristics & Design Principles o f “ First” & “Second Generation” E-learning Resource: Veselina Nedeva , Dimitar Nedeva, 2008, Evolution in the E-Learning Systems with Intelligent Technologies. FIRST SECOND
    • Technology driven
    • Linear-sequential logic of component parts
    • Instructor-in-control
    • Evaluation based on content memorization repetitive practice and “passing the test”
    • Engagement –primarily visual, “eye catching”
    • Separates theory and practice
    • Separate systems for learning and knowledge capture / dissemination
    • Pedagogy driven
    • Holographic-fractal; self-organizing
    • Learner-in-control
    • Evaluation based on self-assessment, reflective practice and successful application
    • Engagement through provocation / hooks /ideas
    • Integrates theory / practice / work / learning in real-time
    • Integrated learning, knowledge creation and knowledge sharing
  • 29. E -Learning Systems’ Evolution Static Interactive Collaborative Personalised Conditional Dynamic HTML- or text-based Database driven Communicative Integrated Intelligent Content Pedagogy Multimedia Systems E-LEARNING TECHOLOGY AND PEDAGOGY _continue Resource: Dr Wolfgang Greller . E.Learning&Pedagogy.2005 University of Veterinary Science Vienna
  • 30. E-LEARNING TECHNOLOGY AND PEDAGOGY _continue Connolly and Stansfield First Wave: Open standards for Data Communication: The Intern et Second Wave: Open standards for Data Presentation: World Wide Web Third Wave: Open standards for network-based applications: Web Service The future development according to is based on Enabling Technologies Learning Object Repositories, Optical Networks, Grids, Web Services. 1994-1999 2000-2003 2003-on going Since 2002 some authors mentioned
  • 31.
    • Basic Terms
    • Importance of e-Learning Technology
    • Disaster Prevention Educatio n
    • How to Publicize e-Learning Technology
    • for Disaster Prevention Education
    • E-Learning Technology and Pedagogy
    • Case Study: E-Learning Applications in Turkey
    CONTENT
  • 32. T.C. M INISTRY OF EDUCATION BASIC DISASTER AWARENESS SELF STUDY DISTANCE LEARNING FOR TURKISH SCHOOLS PROJECT SUMMARY JANUARY 2004 CASE STUDY
  • 33. BASIC DISASTER AWARENESS IN TURKISH SCHOOLS www.ahep.org
  • 34. BASIC DISASTER AWARENESS IN TURKISH SCHOOLS Worked with T.C Mi nistry of Education and inserted the BDA training materials to MoE national primary education curriculium!
  • 35.
    • November, 2009
    Turkey
  • 36. DREAMS: E-Learning Courseware for Disaster Prevention Education
    • Self-study or instructor-moderated courses
    • Open-ended or time-limited
    • Modular
    • Easily-adapted
  • 37. DREAMS: Customized Dissemination Portal
    • Customized e-learning dissemination site based on Moodle, including:
      • Courses
      • Action-planning area to cooperate on real school disaster management milestones.
      • Monitoring progress
      • Recognizing achievements
      • Easily adapted
  • 38. DREAMS: Customized Dissemination Portal
    • E-LEARNING SYSTEM DEVELOPMENT
    • FOR INTERNATIONAL USE
    • E-learning Management System
        • Moodle
        • Virtual Classroom
        • Learning Objects Repository
        • Skype
    • Shared Collaborative Authoring Tools
  • 39. For more informatıon and to share information: UN ISDR PreventionWeb: DRR http://www.preventionweb.net Teachers and Educators Network for Disaster Prevetion http://edu4drr.ning.com Coalition for Global School Safety and Disaster Prevention Education http://cogssdpe.ning.com
  • 40. What is Facilitation? + T H A N K Y O U Zeynep Turkmen Sanduvac [email_address] [email_address] Facilis OR fac(ere) "to do or make" -ilis "easier".