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WRI discusses the challenges and potential for oil palm development on degraded land.

WRI discusses the challenges and potential for oil palm development on degraded land.

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Session 3-5-moray-mcleish-directing-oil-palm-expansion-onto-degraded-land-1471 Session 3-5-moray-mcleish-directing-oil-palm-expansion-onto-degraded-land-1471 Presentation Transcript

  • Directing Palm Oil Expansion onto Degraded Land Presentation to ZSL Symposium, 4 May 2011 Moray McLeish Manager, Project POTICO World Resources Institute World Resources Institute
  • World Resources Institute– committed to protecting the environment and improving peoples lives– established 1982, $40m pa turnover– $10 m on ecosystems and land use– Board Members: Al Gore, Fernando Henrique Cardoso How? – research and facilitation – analytical excellence – working with partners to put ideas into action eg Sekala, Wal Mart World Resources Institute
  • Agenda 1. The past and the future 2. What is ‘degraded land’? 3. Degraded Land for sustainable palm oil 4. Community Mapping for FPIC 5. Land Swaps 6. Conclusions World Resources Institute
  • What we have seen in the past Carbon rich land converted to oil palm plantation World Resources Institute
  • What Indonesia needs to see in the future "We have a policy to use degraded land ... for the continuation of the palm oil industry in Indonesia” – Indonesian President SBY, Oslo, May 2010 Degraded land used for new plantations World Resources Institute
  • Complications hindering movement fromthe past to the future Technical - Lack of accurate land cover data Social - Land claims and tenure issues Legal - Status on paper vs reality on the ground Financial - Permits already issued World Resources Institute
  • biophysical conditionsWhat is degraded land? predetermined and difficult to change • native vegetation damaged • low potential for recovery • carbon stock •functioning of ecosystem services • No HCV 1- 4 World Resources Institute
  • Considerations in using degraded land biophysical conditions technology and management predetermined and difficult to change competencies of the planter influence viability • native vegetation damaged • land/soil productivity • potential for recovery • slope • carbon stock •functioning of ecosystem • size (contiguous) services • transport infrastructure • High Conservation Values 1 - 4 Degraded • labor inputs land suitable for sustainable palm oil World Resources Institute
  • Criteria for identifying suitable degraded land World Resources Institute
  • 400 000 ha of suitable degraded land in West Kalimantan POTICO Potential, KalBar Degraded, high potential Degraded, potential Unsuitable World Resources Institute
  • Considerations in using degraded land biophysical conditions technology and management predetermined and difficult to change competencies of the planter influence viability • native vegetation damaged • land/soil productivity • potential for recovery • slope • carbon stock •functioning of ecosystem • size (contiguous) services • transport infrastructure • High Conservation Values 1 - 4 Degraded • labor inputs land suitable for sustainable palm oil • respect for customary rights • potential to improve livelihood of local people • free & prior informed consent (FPIC) • HCV 5 - 6  depend on current livelihood and the deal being community preferences World Resources Institute
  • Negotiating Future – Community Mapping and FPIC FPIC = Free, Prior, and Informed Consent • Community rights to get information ( be informed), • before (prior) a program or a project is implemented in their area, • to allow them freely to agree (consent) or disagree World Resources Institute
  • Community Mapping Objectives • To organize the community • To map what the community think important to map • To understand/document cultures • To advocate indigenous geographical names • To negotiate territory • To negotiate land use plan • To identify HCVs World Resources Institute
  • How community mapping will be useful forFPIC, livelihood and land use negotiation? • Community map shows community values over resources as basic information to discuss any agricultural development plan, livelihood options • Community will have better understanding of spatial context using their own maps • Community will be more organized in decision making and negotiation process World Resources Institute
  • Considerations in using degraded land biophysical conditions technology and management predetermined and difficult to change competencies of the planter influence viability • native vegetation damaged • land/soil productivity • potential for recovery • slope • carbon stock •functioning of ecosystem • size (contiguous) services • transport infrastructure • High Conservation Values 1 - 4 Degraded • labor inputs land suitable for sustainable palm oil • land status • respect for customary rights • potential to improve livelihood • local government plans of local people •local ownership & use • free & prior informed consent rights (FPIC) • HCV 5 - 6  legal status can be changed  depend on current livelihood and the deal being planning and zoning community preferences World Resources Institute
  • NON-FORESTEDFOREST LAND FORESTED NON-FOREST LAND World Resources Institute
  • Converting Land Status – Legal Analysis World Resources Institute
  • Using the land use plan revision process tochange land status WORLD RESOURCES INSTITUTE POTICO Tract 1 Borneo Tract 2 World Resources Institute
  • Indonesia –Norway Letter of Intent Cooperation on reducing greenhouse gas emissions from deforestation and forest degradation • To establish a bank of land, onto which future agricultural expansion will be directed • Land to with which to swap • Drawing upon ideas and tools we are developing, to achieve best practices. World Resources Institute
  • Summary and conclusions More positive terminology needed To reflect opportunity not threat Methodology preferable to definition More likely to gain consensus, adaptable to different situations ‘Degraded Land’ Database Areas for sustainable agricultural expansion Land Swaps To undo mistakes of the past World Resources Institute
  • Thank you mmcleish@wri.org World Resources Institute