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  • Volume – can be heard comfortably at back of room Variety – of volume and tone Vocabulary – never swear Don’t let your voice trail off at the end of a statement / question
  • attention to mixed messages (up implies question; down implies conviction & strength) There is a good evolutionary reason for this. It is possible that man first communicated by sung tones, rather than words. Still tone is over four times more important in communication than content.

Yuva ppt how to presnt Yuva ppt how to presnt Presentation Transcript

  • HOW TO PRESENT A SEMINAR DR.S.YUVARAJAN,M.B.B.S(GOLD MEDALIST) RESIDENT , DEPT OF PULMONARY MEDICINE GMCH, NAGPUR
  • Presentation Skills
  • Presentation Challenges Content Organization Delivery Fear
  • CONTENT
    • Relevant material for audience’s knowledge level
    • Acknowledgement of audience’s wants and needs
    • Sufficient depth in support material
    • Interesting examples for audience
    • Appropriate visual aids
  • ORGANIZATION
    • Introduction
      • DEFINITION OF TOPIC
      • DESCRIPTION OF THAT IN LUCID WAY
      • DESCRIPTION OF THAT TOPIC TO DEPTH
      • RELEVENT EXAMPLES AND MATERIALS FROM TEXTS , JOURNALS , RECENT ARTICLES ABOUT THE TOPIC
      • TRY TO USE MORE FLOW CHARTS FOR BETTER UNDERSTANDING
    • RELEVENT EXPLANATION OF BASIC SCIENCES TO THAT TOPIC
    • CONCLUSION AND SUMMARY
    • REFERENCES
  • DELIVERY
    • Moves comfortably and gestures naturally
    • Looks at each member of the audience
    • Speaks conversationally and enthusiastically
    • Handles visual aids effectively
  • Fear (Being afraid!]
    • Biggest problem when speaking to groups is fear
    • Largely fear of the unknown
    • Reduce fear by reducing the unknown
  • 1) First, Do Your Homework
    • What: Situation
    • Who: Audience
    • Why: Objectives
    • How: Methodology
  • Define the Situation: Is it to …
    • Inform?
    • Teach?
    • Solicit input?
    • Persuade or sell?
    • Stimulate thought?
    What is the most important message that you want your audience to receive?
  • The Answers Will …
    • Determine the material you will use
    • Guide your approach to the presentation situation
    Pitch your presentation to the ‘right level’ of the audience.
  • Define Your Objectives
    • Gives you a goal to hit, a goal to attain as a result of your presentation
    • Do not include anything (data, visuals, examples, etc.) in your presentation that doesn’t help you achieve the objectives
  • 2) Get the Words in Order
    • Introduction
    • Body
    • Conclusion
  • … also means—
    • Tell them what you are going to say.
    • Say it.
    • Tell them what you said.
  • Preparing Your Material
    • Determine your objectives
    • Plan a beginning, a middle, an end
    • Select key ideas and results to be presented
    • Organize the material
    • Enhance with visuals, numbers, examples
  • Introduction (Tell them what you are going to say.)
    • Grab their attention
    • State your purpose
    • Explain your agenda
    • Establish personal benefit
  • Remember to include …
    • Greetings
    • Acknowledgements
    • Agenda
  • Body (Say it.)
    • Help the audience get the greatest amount of information with the least amount of mental effort.
    • Main points (maximum of 7)
  • Conclusion (Tell them what you said.)
    • Summarize main points
    • Ask for specific action
    • Make last words memorable
      • Not ‘any questions?’ (“Question and answer” BEFORE the final statement)
      • Not just ‘thank you’ (Do this in the introduction)
  • Visual Aids Are …
    • Visible (can be seen)
    • Aid (assist; help)
    Don’t automatically improve presentations! Visual Aids …
  • Visual aids play supporting role. Who plays the major role?
    • You
    You! are the expert
    • You
    are the one who was asked to speak
  • Do use visuals to …
    • Focus the audience’s attention
    • Reinforce your verbal message
    • Stimulate interest and add impact
    • Illustrate factors that are hard to visualize
  • Don’t use visuals to …
    • Impress your audience with detail and animation
    • Avoid interaction with audience
    • Make more than one point per slide
    • Present simple ideas that are easily stated verbally
    • Provide outline for audience
    • Provide outline for you
    • Support verbal message with visual images to increase retention
    • Support words with numbers and graphics to increase understanding
    Visuals
  • If yes, what visuals do I need? A visual must be necessary.
  • Preparing Good Visual Aids
    • Appropriate
    • Clear
    • Consistent
    • Dynamic
  • Appropriate (Who is your audience?)
    • Type of visual aid
    • Choice of overall design (‘template’)
    • Choice of graphics/pictures/charts
  • Present one key point per slide
    • … because more than one idea in a slide
      • Distracts the audience
      • Lessens the focus and impact of the message
  • Make visuals big enough to see
    • Up to the last row of seats
    • Should be easy to see
      • … including the labels on charts and tables
    • Highlight areas of a complex diagram or flowchart or organizational chart
    • Large and simple works well!
    • Prefer this size
    • Not this size
  • Make Text and Numbers Legible
    • Use a minimum of 24 point size (This is 34 point)
    • This is 24 point size
    • This is 20 point size
    • This is 14 point size
  • Presenting Text
    • Short bullets work better
      • Short bullets actually are much more effective from a visual standpoint, while still effectively making your point compared to long paragraphs of text (like this paragraph).
    • Don’t ferget to chack your spalling
  • ‘ 5 x 5’ Guideline
    • Maximum of 5 bullet points
    • Maximum of 5 words per bullet
  • When presenting numbers …
    • Maximum of 10 – 15 numbers in a slide
    • Round to whole numbers
    • Prefer graphs over tables of numbers
  • Consistent
    • Background
    • Font
    • Structure
    • Capitalization
    • Spacing
    • Illustrations
    • Colors
    Start with Design Templates in PowerPoint
  • Use Color Carefully
    • Keep consistent theme or template
    • No more than three or four colors per slide
    • Contrasting colors provides maximum visibility
      • Dark colors for background
      • Light color for text
  • Capital Letters …
    • Only for first letter of first word in bullet point
      • ALL CAPS (LIKE THIS) ARE MORE DIFFICULT TO READ
  • Images preferred over text
    • Lists into tables
    • Numbers into graphs
    • Wordy descriptions into diagrams
  • Transitions & Animations
    • Movement
    • Multimedia
      • Sight and sound
    • Stages and steps
      • ‘ Builds’
    • Create interest
      • Guide eye
    • Simplify
    • Organize
  • Using builds and animations
    • Helps explain flow of complex process
    • Keeps audience attention
    • But, too much interferes with the message
      • … so use sparingly.
    • Avoid mixing different slide transition effects
  • How to Use Visuals Some Do’s and Don’ts
  • Talk about what’s on the slide.
  • Give the audience time to see the slide.
  • Enough time …
    • Don’t put too much on a slide!
  • How Many Slides?
    • Give two-minutes for presenting a ‘full’ slide
    • Arithmetic:
      • 10-minute presentation = not more than 5 slides
      • 15-minute presentation = not more than 7 slides
      • 20-minute presentation = not more than 10 slides
  • Important Don’ts
    • Do not read text on slides word for word
    • Do not face the screen and turn your back to the audience when pointing to slides
    • Do not rely on slides completely
      • What do you do when there is no electrical power or when bulb of projector unexpectedly burns out?
  • Uses of Handouts
    • Reinforce important information
    • Summarize action items for the audience to follow-up on
    • Supply supporting data
    Handouts are the place for detailed tables, organizational charts, explanations.
  • A Good Speaker …
    • Knows the presentation material
    • Has verbal and nonverbal skills
    • Expresses confidence
    I am who I am.
  • Show You Know Your Material
    • Use written notes with discretion– don’t read word for word.
    • Manage visual aids smoothly
      • Use pointers
      • Know how to move around in PowerPoint slides view
    • Don’t rush your delivery
    • Handle questions well
  • Effective Public Speaking: 7% Words
    Voice: 38% Tone Inflection Face & Body: 55% Facial Expression & Body Language
  • Verbal Skills: Your Voice
    • Speak clearly
      • Pronunciation
      • Volume
      • Pitch
    • Speak expressively
      • Tone
      • Pace and Speed
      • Timing
    Technical Dramatic
  • Volume
    • Project your voice to be heard—
      • Aim for back of the room
    • Gain maximum attention
      • Say some words louder
  • Tone
    • Emphasis placed on a word to create meaning
    • Variation prevents monotonous presentations
  • Pace and Speed
    • Speed at which speaker presents different topics or thoughts within a topic
    • Speaker adjusts pace according to listeners’ and speakers’ interest
    • Effective speakers change their rate of speed to fit their purpose, content, listeners’ & personal style
  • Timing
    • Go s l o w e r to emphasize major points
    • Pause often & look at audience
    • Give emphasis with voice & body
  • Nonverbal Skills: Face & Body
    • Exhibit physical control
      • Face
      • Hands
      • Feet
      • Space
    • Dress appropriately
    How you look How you move
  • Body Language: Messages You Send Thru-- Facial expressions Posture Gesture
  • Facial Expressions
    • Eyes are the windows to the soul
    • Face is the front of the house
      • SMILE!
      • Act out what you’re saying.
        • Frown
        • Shake your head
        • Raise your eyebrows
  • Posture ‘Do’ Stand up straight.
  • Posture Don’ts
    • Lean on the podium
    • Stand with hands on hips
    • Sway back and forth
    • Stand with arms folded across chest
    • Arms behind back
    • Bury hands in pockets
  • Gestures What to do with hands?
  • Eye Contact Using your eyes
  • Use Your Eyes to …
    • Look at individuals
      • Not one but many
    • Establish eye contact at the end of a thought
  • Eye Contact– Don’t:
    • Look out the window, at ceiling, at wall, at floor
    • Look at one spot
    • Forget to look at the back row
    • Let notes get in the way of eye contact
    • Look over the heads of the audience
  • Image
    • Appropriate attire enhances credibility
    • Your attire is part of your message
    • Wear comfortable clothes
  • Basics of Q&A
    • Anticipate questions
    • Listen to the question
    • Repeat the question
      • Make sure everyone heard the question
      • Make sure you heard the question correctly
    • Don’t guess
    • Keep your answer brief
  • Express Confidence!
    • Smile.
    • Stand up straight.
    • Look your listeners in the eyes.
    • Be yourself.
  • Practice, practice, practice.
  • When Silence Is Golden
    • Wise men think without talking; fools reverse the process.
    • Half of wisdom is being silent when you have nothing to say.
    • We were given two ears and one mouth, so we ought to listen twice as much as we speak.