Black berry playbook security   part two - blackberry bridge
 

Black berry playbook security part two - blackberry bridge

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Black berry playbook security   part two - blackberry bridge Black berry playbook security part two - blackberry bridge Document Transcript

  • BlackBerry PlayBook Security: Part two BlackBerry Bridge Gavin Jones Managing Consultant gavin.jones@ngssecure.com An NGS Secure Research Publication 15th November 2011 © Copyright 2011 NGS Secure http://www.ngssecure.com
  • Playbook Security: Part two – BlackBerry BridgeTable of Contents1. Introduction ........................................................................................................................................ 32. Background ......................................................................................................................................... 3 2.1. Overview ...................................................................................................................................... 3 2.2. Previous Work .............................................................................................................................. 4 2.3. Caveats ......................................................................................................................................... 43. Research.............................................................................................................................................. 4 3.1. BlackBerry Bridge Connection ....................................................................................................... 4 3.2. PlayBook Screenshot Functionality ................................................................................................ 7 3.3. Bridge Browser Functionality ........................................................................................................ 74. Conclusion ......................................................................................................................................... 105. References ........................................................................................................................................ 10
  • Playbook Security: Part two – BlackBerry Bridge1. IntroductionThis is the second in a series of white papers regarding the security of the BlackBerry PlayBook, the firsttablet device released by Research in Motion (RIM). The primary goal of the research that led to thispaper was to gain an understanding of the functionality and security applied to the BlackBerry Bridge.Although the main body of work is primarily aimed at a reasonably technical audience, the key findingsand conclusions drawn from these are presented at the end of the document.2. Background2.1. OverviewThe BlackBerry Bridge is an application that allows users to connect the PlayBook tablet to a BlackBerryEnterprise Server via a smartphone and enables the use of applications on the tablet through the phonesuch as email, contacts and calendar, all of which are currently not included natively on the device. As aminimum requirement, version 5.0 of the smartphone software is required to use the BlackBerry Bridgefunctionality [3].The application can also be used for tethering the tablet to a mobile network through the smartphonesmobile connection since the first version of the tablet devices are Wi-Fi only devices.The tablet and smartphone perform two pairing processes in order to open an encrypted andauthenticated connection between each of them:  A Bluetooth pairing process to open a Bluetooth connection  A BlackBerry Bridge pairing process to provide an additional level of security to the connection.During the Bluetooth pairing process the tablet and smartphone share a Bluetooth key that is used toencrypt and decrypt data that is sent between the tablet and smartphone. In the BlackBerry Bridgepairing process the tablet and smartphone share a BlackBerry Bridge pairing key which is used to bothauthenticate the connection and encrypt and decrypt data that is sent between the tablet andsmartphone. If the smartphone was activated on a BlackBerry Enterprise Server the tablet andsmartphone also share the BlackBerry Bridge work key. Full technical details of the encryptionalgorithms used during this process are described in RIM’s BlackBerry PlayBook Security TechnicalOverview[4].The tablet has been designed to reconnect automatically to a smartphone that it was previouslyconnected to if the tablet did not delete either the Bluetooth key or BlackBerry Bridge pairing key.
  • Playbook Security: Part two – BlackBerry Bridge2.2. Previous WorkThis paper follows on from the previous NGS Secure whitepaper “BlackBerry PlayBook Security: Partone” [1] by Daniel Martin Gomez and Andy Davis.2.3. CaveatsIt should be noted that the BlackBerry Bridge functionality is not currently supported by the PlayBooksimulator (where “root” level access can be achieved by patching the VMDK file [2]). Therefore, theresearch performed was restricted due to the fact that the PlayBook tablet device was only accessibleover SSH using the “devuser” low privileged account with limited access to the tablet’s file system.3. Research3.1. BlackBerry Bridge ConnectionAfter a user connects the tablet to a smartphone (See section 3.1.1 of [1]) requiring an unlock password,the tablet automatically requires that the user provides the password before the tablet accesses anysmartphone data.Smartphone data can include email messages, calendar entries, tasks, memos, BlackBerry Messengermessages, intranet content, files or attachments that the user views on the tablet.The tablet requires that the user provide the smartphone password regardless of whether theapplications are running in work mode or personal mode. Applications on the tablet can run in workmode, personal mode, or both, depending on the metadata that is associated with them. By default, allapplications on the tablet run in personal mode. After the tablet user connects the tablet to asmartphone that is activated on a BlackBerry Enterprise Server (BES) an application can then run in“work” mode and the tablet permits the user to view and interact with “work” data.“Work” data consists of all email messages, calendar entries, and attachments that a BES and asmartphone send between each other and any additional data that is associated with work applications.A media card must be present in the paired smartphone to permit the user to interact with the “work”data e.g. to open attachments on the tablet or save updates to files.To help protect “work” data the tablet automatically creates a “work” file system in the BlackBerryTablet OS that isolates the “work” data and “work” applications from “personal” data and “personal”applications.The tablet caches “work” data locally using the “work” file system and is designed to prevent “work”data from persisting in flash memory in its cleartext form by encrypting the “work” file system usingXTS-AES-256 encryption. The tablet queues any “work” file updates for sending to the media card that isinserted in the smartphone and sends the updates to the smartphone frequently.
  • Playbook Security: Part two – BlackBerry BridgeThe tablet is designed to prevent the user from accessing the “work” file system directly on the tablet byrequiring them to use a bridge application to access the work file system as shown below: Figure 1: Files ApplicationWhen the tablet runs the “Bridge Files” application the user can access the files that are stored on themedia card that is inserted in the smartphone. The tablet opens these files using “work” applicationsand classifies the files as “work” data.When the user connects the tablet to the smartphone using the BlackBerry Bridge the tablet displays theBlackBerry Bridge panel. The user can then use this panel to access “work“ applications as shown below: Figure 2: BlackBerry Bridge Panel
  • Playbook Security: Part two – BlackBerry BridgeThe image below shows how the work file system is implemented on the device [4]: Figure 3: File System ConfigurationThe tablet does not allow the user to move data from the “work” file system to the “personal” filesystem and the user cannot cut, copy, or paste data from a “work” file in to a “personal” file. Similarly,the tablet does not allow a user to move data from the “personal” file system to the “work” file systemand the user cannot cut, copy, or paste “personal” data into a “work” file. The user can however attacha personal file to a work email message or work calendar entry.All the password features that apply to the smartphone are also extended to the tablet e.g. the tabletuses the same security timeout as the smartphone that it is connected to.
  • Playbook Security: Part two – BlackBerry Bridge3.2. PlayBook Screenshot FunctionalityThe tablet allows a user to take a screenshot of the current screen by holding the “Volume Up” key and“Volume Down” key at the same time. The user can only take screenshots when the tablet is running in“personal” mode. The tablet saves screen shots in the Camera application and displays them in thePhoto viewer application.The tablet treats screen shots as “personal” files so it prevents the user from taking screen shots of“work” data when a “work” application is open and unlocked.3.3. Bridge Browser FunctionalityIf the “Allow Browser” IT policy rule on a BlackBerry Enterprise Server is set to “Yes” and the userconfigures the BlackBerry MDS Connection Service to connect a smartphone to the Internet andintranet, a tablet connected to the smartphone can use the Bridge Browser to browse the Internet orintranet in “work” mode.The BlackBerry MDS Connection Service connects wireless applications on BlackBerry devices to theapplications on an organization’s application servers or web servers. After a wireless application isinstalled on BlackBerry devices, the application can receive data from “push” applications accessible onweb servers. The application can also receive data by sending “pull” requests from BlackBerry devices.The BlackBerry MDS Connection Service processes “push” and “pull” requests and delivers data andupdates to BlackBerry applications.The Bridge Browser does not use the Wi-Fi connection to connect to the Internet or intranet. Instead, ituses the smartphones connection to the BlackBerry MDS Connection Service.By default, when a user clicks on a link in a “work” application (for example, a link in “work” emailmessages, calendar entries, the contact list, tasks, memos, or BlackBerry Messenger messages), thetablet opens the link in “personal” mode using the browser. However, the tablet opens the link in“work” mode using the Bridge Browser if any of the following conditions exist: • The link is to an address that is not routable on the public Internet, such as a private IP address as specified in RFC 1918 or an address that does not contain periods. • The link is to a domain that is included in the MDS Browser Domains IT policy rule that applies to the smartphone that the tablet is connected to. • The Wi-Fi Internet Access Path IT policy rule that applies to the smartphone that the tablet is connected to is set to "Access through BlackBerry MDS Connection Service". • No Wi-Fi connection is available.To open a link using the Bridge Browser, the tablet must be able to access the BlackBerry MDSConnection Service.
  • Playbook Security: Part two – BlackBerry BridgeAlthough, as stated above, the PlayBook will attempt to open a link to an RFC 1918 address using theBridge Browser it was discovered that if a known hostname is hijacked and in turn pointed to an RFC1918 address the (non-Bridge) Browser is used in its place.The following hostname was configured with a static entry within the DNS server. Figure 4: Static DNS EntryThis was confirmed with a simple nslookup command showing that the configured IP address was beingreturned by the DNS server: Figure 5: DNS ResponseA listener was then started on the destination host and as can be seen the PlayBook connected using thebrowser when a link was sent to the target and clicked. Figure 6: Simple TCP ListenerThe listener response was a simple text string (“Hello Playbook!”) which instead of being rendered bythe browser as text as expected, a prompt was displayed requesting a filename to save the response.
  • Playbook Security: Part two – BlackBerry BridgeAs shown below the file was saved as “m.txt” and contained the following contents. Figure 7: Saved File ContentsThe permissions of the saved file on the PlayBook are shown below. Figure 8: Saved File PermissionsIt was also possible to respond to the initial request with an HTTP redirect to any arbitrary host in placeof the text response.From the end user perspective, apart from the caption displayed when switching between applications,there appears to be no way to differentiate between whether the Bridge Browser or (non-Bridge)Browser is being executed as both applications appear visually identical. Figure 9: Browser Caption
  • Playbook Security: Part two – BlackBerry BridgeTherefore it would be possible to coerce a user to follow a link whereby their expectation is that the linkis for an internal “work” host and therefore it is inherently trusted by the user, although it is in factaccessed using the (non-Bridge) browser application and is a host controlled by the attacker.4. ConclusionOverall the security surrounding the BlackBerry Bridge functionality appears to have been wellimplemented, with the additional layer of protection offered by the BlackBerry Bridge pairing process ontop of the Bluetooth pairing process. This provides a robust authenticated and encrypted connectionbetween the tablet and the smartphone.The separation of “work” and “personal” data has been well segregated by using storage on theBlackBerry smartphone and appropriate encryption for any data temporarily stored on the PlayBook. Inaddition, steps have been taken to prevent users from copy any pasting “work” and “personal” databetween different applications when the BlackBerry Bridge is activated. However, further research intothe separation of data between both the “work” and “personal” file systems would be possible withmore privileged access to the QNX operating system running on the device.The encryption used to protect data traversing the BlackBerry Bridge is considered to be adequate. Theencryption algorithm currently used to generate the BlackBerry Bridge pairing key is currentlyconsidered robust enough to render brute force attacks computationally infeasible[4].The attacker onlyhas a single attempt to guess the shared secret. If the guess is incorrect the tablet user must restart theBlackBerry Bridge pairing process which in turn creates a new shared secret, before the attacker canmake another guess.One recommendation that has been made to RIM was that a visual differentiator should be added tothe “Bridge Browser” application to ensure the user is made aware of which browser is being launchedwhen following a link. RIM has agreed with this recommendation and their development team isconsidering implementing the feature in a future software release.5. References 1. http://www.ngssecure.com/Libraries/Document_Downloads/BlackBerry_PlayBook_Security_-_Part_one.sflb.ashx 2. http://cmw.me/?q=node/47 3. http://docs.blackberry.com/en/smartphone_users/deliverables/27018/About_Bridge_1266476_11.jsp 4. http://docs.blackberry.com/en/admin/deliverables/26992/BlackBerry_PlayBook-Security_Technical_Overview-- 1315426-0407044208-001-1.0-US.pdf