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LANDS OF OPPORTUNITYRESTORE PRODUCTIVE CAPACITY IN AFRICA’SDRYLANDS BY BUILDING ON SUCCESSES
CHALLENGE: INCREASE HOUSEHOLD FOODPRODUCTION, STABILIZE HH ACCESS TO FOOD ANDINCREASE WATER AVAILABILITY
THE CONVENTIONAL AGRICULTURAL MODERNISATIONPARADIGM IN ACTIONHOW SUSTAINABLE, IF IMPROVING SOIL ORGANICMATTER IS THE KEY T...
STUDY AREAS LONG TERM TRENDSIN AGRICULTURE AND ENVIRONMENT
TREND 1FARMERS INVEST IN AGROFORESTRY:MILLIONS OF HA OF NEW AFPARKLANDS)TREND 2REHABILITATION OF BARREN LANDUSING WATER HA...
Vegetation in Galma in 1975 and 2003(before and after)             1975                      2003
Improved soil fertility, fodder production,shade is « turning down the heat »
SHADE MAKES A DIFFERENCE TO PEOPLE,CROPS AND LIVESTOCK
BAOBABS DOMINATE REGENERATIONIN PARTS MIRRIAH DEPARTMENT(NIGER)
The annual value of the leaves of onemature baobab varies from 28 $ – 70 US $This can buy 70 – 175 kg of grain on the mark...
Farmer-managed re-greening inNiger  5,000,000 ha re-greened in 20 years   (no recurrent costs to governments)  200 milli...
Grain surplus Kantché Department(Zinder/Niger). 350,000 inhabitants;high on-farm tree density     2007        + 21,230 to...
YOUNG COMBRETUM GLUTINOSUM PRODUCESTONS OF LITTER : NO TRANSPORT AND SOMESHADE TO CROPS
WATER HARVESTING AND AGROFORESTRY Simple techniques                                                 1990                  ...
ZAI HELP CROPS GET THROUGHDRY SPELLS
Internal rates of return to investments in:Zaï (planting pits)                 82%Half moons                          37%A...
October 1988 (water harvesting techniquesintroduced on barren land in 1985)
SAME FIELD IN OCTOBER 2008
WATER HARVESTING TECHNIQUES CONTRIBUTETO LOCAL GROUNDWATER RECHARGE
Water levels in wells increased by 14 min 10 years (1994 – 2004) (picture Nov. 2004)
Water levels still high in January 2012 andnumber of gardens incrased from:0 in 19944 in 200410 in 2012
MORINGA: AN UNDERUTILIZED SPECIES WITH HIGHIMPACT ON NUTRITION IS EXPANDING RAPIDLYIN NIGER
AGROFORESTRY IS THE FUTURE OF AGRICULTUREIN DRYLANDS AND SUB-HUMID REGIONSNO RECURRENT COSTS TO GOVERNMENTS
CROP YIELDS CAN BE DOUBLED BYINTEGRATING A SET OF PROVEN TECHNOLOGIES              +                  +   Water          A...
APPROACH: MOBILIZE MILLIONS OF FARMERSTO INVEST IN TREES, MICRO DOSING,WATER HARVESTING AND IMPROVED SEEDS
Some lessons  Since the 1980s, a growing number of   farmers practise Climate Smart   Agriculture  Farmers invest in tre...
IT IS POSSIBLE TO IMPROVE FOOD SECURITY ANDLIVELIHOODS OF MILLIONS OF SMALL-SCALEPRODUCERS IN AFRICA THROUGH RE-GREENING
Chris ReijSenior FellowWorld Resources Institutechris.reij@wri.orgc.p.reij@vu.nlwww.africa-regreening.blogspot.com
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Climate Smart agriculture in Africa's drylands

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A revolution in African drylands agriculture is under way. Chris Reij shows what it means, how it's done - and how to boost it further.

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  • Water harvesting helps with reducing rainfall runoff, increasing infilitration of water into the soil and shallow aquifers, and increases groundwater recharge Agroforestry helps with nitrogen and replenishing soil organic matter, and increasing soil moisture holding capacity – benefitting crop growth But soil may still lacks some critical nutrients such as P and K So, to boost yields further, micro-dosing of fertilizers could help. But erosion must first be controlled and soil organic matter must be replenished to increase fertilizer-use efficiency. Taken all together, this investment in restoring and maintain ecosystem services for sustainable agriculture provide a solid foundation for intensification, diversification and further long term increases in farm productivity. Integrated soil fertility management (ISFM) combines the effective and efficient use of inorganic as well as organic amendments to restore and maintain soil health, enabling farmers to optimize use of soil nutrients and water, and to increase yields .
  • Transcript of "Climate Smart agriculture in Africa's drylands"

    1. 1. LANDS OF OPPORTUNITYRESTORE PRODUCTIVE CAPACITY IN AFRICA’SDRYLANDS BY BUILDING ON SUCCESSES
    2. 2. CHALLENGE: INCREASE HOUSEHOLD FOODPRODUCTION, STABILIZE HH ACCESS TO FOOD ANDINCREASE WATER AVAILABILITY
    3. 3. THE CONVENTIONAL AGRICULTURAL MODERNISATIONPARADIGM IN ACTIONHOW SUSTAINABLE, IF IMPROVING SOIL ORGANICMATTER IS THE KEY TO SUSTAINING CROP YIELDS?I
    4. 4. STUDY AREAS LONG TERM TRENDSIN AGRICULTURE AND ENVIRONMENT
    5. 5. TREND 1FARMERS INVEST IN AGROFORESTRY:MILLIONS OF HA OF NEW AFPARKLANDS)TREND 2REHABILITATION OF BARREN LANDUSING WATER HARVESTINGTECHNIQUES(500,000 ha in Niger and Burkina Faso)
    6. 6. Vegetation in Galma in 1975 and 2003(before and after) 1975 2003
    7. 7. Improved soil fertility, fodder production,shade is « turning down the heat »
    8. 8. SHADE MAKES A DIFFERENCE TO PEOPLE,CROPS AND LIVESTOCK
    9. 9. BAOBABS DOMINATE REGENERATIONIN PARTS MIRRIAH DEPARTMENT(NIGER)
    10. 10. The annual value of the leaves of onemature baobab varies from 28 $ – 70 US $This can buy 70 – 175 kg of grain on the marketSource: Yamba and Sambo (2012)
    11. 11. Farmer-managed re-greening inNiger  5,000,000 ha re-greened in 20 years (no recurrent costs to governments)  200 million new trees (not planted)  additional cereal production/year: 500,000 ton  2.5 million people fed  1.25 million farm households involved
    12. 12. Grain surplus Kantché Department(Zinder/Niger). 350,000 inhabitants;high on-farm tree density  2007 + 21,230 ton  2008 + 36,838 ton  2009 + 28,122 ton  2010 + 64,208 ton  2011 + 13,818 ton Source: National Committee for the Prevention and Management of Food Crises and FEWS Quoted by: Yamba and sambo (2012)
    13. 13. YOUNG COMBRETUM GLUTINOSUM PRODUCESTONS OF LITTER : NO TRANSPORT AND SOMESHADE TO CROPS
    14. 14. WATER HARVESTING AND AGROFORESTRY Simple techniques 1990 Zaï Demi lunes Important impacts 2004Piliostigma reticulatum Combretum glutinosum
    15. 15. ZAI HELP CROPS GET THROUGHDRY SPELLS
    16. 16. Internal rates of return to investments in:Zaï (planting pits) 82%Half moons 37%Agroforestry 31%Source: Abdoulaye and Ibro (2006)
    17. 17. October 1988 (water harvesting techniquesintroduced on barren land in 1985)
    18. 18. SAME FIELD IN OCTOBER 2008
    19. 19. WATER HARVESTING TECHNIQUES CONTRIBUTETO LOCAL GROUNDWATER RECHARGE
    20. 20. Water levels in wells increased by 14 min 10 years (1994 – 2004) (picture Nov. 2004)
    21. 21. Water levels still high in January 2012 andnumber of gardens incrased from:0 in 19944 in 200410 in 2012
    22. 22. MORINGA: AN UNDERUTILIZED SPECIES WITH HIGHIMPACT ON NUTRITION IS EXPANDING RAPIDLYIN NIGER
    23. 23. AGROFORESTRY IS THE FUTURE OF AGRICULTUREIN DRYLANDS AND SUB-HUMID REGIONSNO RECURRENT COSTS TO GOVERNMENTS
    24. 24. CROP YIELDS CAN BE DOUBLED BYINTEGRATING A SET OF PROVEN TECHNOLOGIES + + Water Agroforestry Micro-dosing harvesting
    25. 25. APPROACH: MOBILIZE MILLIONS OF FARMERSTO INVEST IN TREES, MICRO DOSING,WATER HARVESTING AND IMPROVED SEEDS
    26. 26. Some lessons  Since the 1980s, a growing number of farmers practise Climate Smart Agriculture  Farmers invest in trees if they have clearly defined user rights  Governments need to develop supportive policies and legislation  Much has been achieved, much more remains to be done, and we know what and how to do it
    27. 27. IT IS POSSIBLE TO IMPROVE FOOD SECURITY ANDLIVELIHOODS OF MILLIONS OF SMALL-SCALEPRODUCERS IN AFRICA THROUGH RE-GREENING
    28. 28. Chris ReijSenior FellowWorld Resources Institutechris.reij@wri.orgc.p.reij@vu.nlwww.africa-regreening.blogspot.com
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