3rd group ( run on sentence )
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3rd group ( run on sentence )

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    3rd group ( run on sentence ) 3rd group ( run on sentence ) Presentation Transcript

    • Farhana Amalya IKhaerunnisaLita Fitri HNuki Kurnia SNurhiekmawati
    • What is… Sentence Complete sentencebeginning with a capital has a subject and aletter and ending with a predicate that workperiod, a question together to make amark, or an exclamation complete thought.point.
    • When two or more sentencesare improperly joined, either bya comma without a conjunction,by a conjunction without acomma, by an improperconjunction, or by nopunctuation at all.
    • Run-On Sentence •Fused Sentence1.2. •Comma Problem •Improper Conjunction3.
    • Fused Sentence• Two or more independent clauses “run together” with no terminal marks of punctuation. • Terminal marks of punctuation–!, ?, ., or ;–may be used to separate two independent clauses.
    • • These punctuation rules aren’t hard I know how to avoid run-ons.• These punctuation rules aren’t hard. I know how to avoid run-ons. Correct!• The ship was enormous its mast was almost 40 feet high.• The ship was enormous. Its mast was almost 40 feet high. Correct!
    • Comma ProblemComma MissingSplice Comma
    • Comma Splice•Two or more sentences can never be joinedwith just a comma.• Run-on sentences of this type can be easilyfixed by:a. adding a coordinating conjunction (i.e. for, and, nor, but, or, yet, so),b. inserting a subordinating conjunction (i.e. because, since, if),c. using a semi-colon,d. or simply making two (or more) complete sentences.
    • Ø When the professor returned my paper Iwas shocked, I had gotten an A. When the professor returned my paper Iwas shocked, for I had gotten an A. When the professor returned my paper Iwas shocked because I had gotten an A. When the professor returned my paper Iwas shocked; I had gotten an A. When the professor returned my paper Iwas shocked. I had gotten an A.
    • Missing CommaWhen joining two or more sentences withcoordinating conjunctions, a comma must beinserted before each conjunction. Usingcoordinating conjunctions without commasresults in run-on sentences.
    • Ø We went to the store and after we had come home and unpacked the groceries my mother wanted to cook a pot of chili but she had forgotten to buy spaghetti. We went to the store, and after we had come home and unpacked the groceries my mother wanted to cook a pot of chili, but she had forgotten to buy spaghetti.
    • Improper ConjunctionAnother type of run-on sentence consists of two or more main clauses joined by an improper conjunction.This mistake commonly occurs when writers incorrectly use transition words (i.e. however, thus, therefore, hence, otherwise, then) as coordinating conjunctions—that is, as sentence joiners.
    • Ø My math professor takes attendance, therefore I have to go to class every day.My math professor takes attendance. Therefore, I have to go to class every day.My math professor takes attendance; therefore, I have to go to class every day.