Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Rogers CDP5 Presentation
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Rogers CDP5 Presentation

946
views

Published on

MLA Citation of sources in plain

MLA Citation of sources in plain

Published in: Education

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
946
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. MLA Citation of Sources A Plain Spoken Approach
  • 2. Why Citation Is Important
    • Modern Language Association (MLA) format avoids plagiarism
    • Plagiarism is defined as:
    • “ the unauthorized use or close imitation of the language and thoughts of another author and the representation of them as one's own original work, as by not crediting the author”.
    • Taken from: “Plagiarism.” In Dictionary.Com . Retrieved from http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/plagiarism
  • 3. Plagiarism
    • Plagiarism is too common today.
    • There are even coupons available for it as shown below:
    • http://www.flickr.com/photos/wfryer/85348757/
    • Fryer, Wesley (Photographer). (January 11, 2006). “Coupon for plagiarism “(photo of coupon). Original in Texas Tech University Coupon Book. Lubbock, Texas . In Flickr. Retrieved October 29, 2011 from http://www.flickr.com/photos/wfryer/85348757/ (Creative Commons License).
  • 4. MLA Citation of Sources
    • Two Parts:
    • In-Text Citations (in parentheses)
    • Works Cited Page (end of essay)
    • Both parts are required for a correct citation.
  • 5. MLA Citation of Sources
    • In-Text Citations are bookmarks for where sources are used
    • (Smith 78)
    • A Works Cited Page is a full list of all source information
    • Shelley, Mary. Frankenstein .
    • New York: Norton,1997. Print.
  • 6. MLA Works Cited Page Entries
    • Hardest Part of MLA Citation
    • Always use a book or a web site as a guide
    • Always appears on its own page or pages
    • Ends the essay
  • 7. How To Create MLA Works Cited Page Entries
    • Find the type of source that you are using in your guide
    • Copy this format exactly
    • Change only the title, author, etc. as necessary
  • 8. How To Create MLA Works Cited Page Entries
    • Example from a guide:
    • A book with one author:
    • Sacks, Oliver. Musicophilia: Tales of Music and theBrain . New York: Knopf, 2007. Print.
    • Taken from: Hacker, Diana and Barbara Fister. (n.d.). Basic format for a book. In Research and Documentation Online. Fifth Edition. Retrieved from http://bcs.bedfordstmartins.com/resdoc5e/
  • 9. How To Create MLA Works Cited Page Entries
    • Parts of the Citation:
    • Author
    • Last Name First. Book Title (in italics).
    • Sacks, Oliver. Musicophilia: Tales of Music and the Brain .
    • City of Year
    • Publication: Publisher, Published. Medium.
    • New York: Knopf, 2007. Print.
    • Taken from: Hacker, Diana and Barbara Fister. (n.d.). Basic format for a book. In Research and Documentation Online. Fifth Edition. Retrieved from http://bcs.bedfordstmartins.com/resdoc5e/
  • 10. How To Create MLA Works Cited Page Entries
    • If your source was:
    • Frankenstien by Mary Shelley printed by Norton Publishers in New York in 1997
    • Then your citation would be:
    • Shelley, Mary. Frankenstein . New York: Norton, 1997. Print.
  • 11. The Author
    • Author’s Name always comes first in a citation (if it is available)
    • Author’s Name is listed as first name, last name.
    • Example: Mary Shelley = Shelley, Mary
    • After the first author, other authors are listed normally
    • Example: Shelley, Mary and Frank Baum
  • 12. The Title
    • The second item in a citation is the title of the work used in the essay.
    • The title can come first if there is no author or the work is anonymous.
    • From our example:
    • Musicophilia: Tales of Music and the Brain .
  • 13. More Than One Title
    • If a larger work contains the work used, then the title of the larger work comes next.
    • For example, if you are using only one article from a magazine:
    • “ Article Title.” Magazine Title .
    • Example:
    • “ Why We Love Horror Movies.” Time .
  • 14. Publication Information
    • Next comes the city of publication
    • Only give the state if the city is not well known
    • Then comes the name of the publisher
    • Then comes the year in which the source was published
    • From our example:
    • New York: Knopf, 2007.
  • 15. The Medium
    • This is the way in which the source is presented
    • For Example: Print, eBook, Web, Video
    • From our example:
    • New York: Knopf, 2007. Print.
    • Most sources today are either Print or Web.
  • 16. Important Notes
    • End all Works Cited Page entries with a period.
    • Never add any abbreviations that are not asked for in your guide
    • Where items fall inside the citation tells your readers what each item involves.
  • 17. The End Result
    • Using a guide to create your citations insures that they are correct.
    • Good things come from well-documented research.

×