Copyright YourDogNeedsYou.com 2010 -
2014.
How to raise a confident puppy
Puppy Class # 1
Copyright YourDogNeedsYou.com 2010 - 2014.
Mia Montagliani
YourDogNeedsYou.com
Puppy training tips and
tools
Copyright YourDogNeedsYou.com 2010 - 2014.
Why are puppy classes so important?
Because puppies make lasting
judgments about the world around
them.
Copyright YourDogN...
By 16 weeks, puppies have
decided what is
good, bad, acceptable, unacce
ptable, scary and safe.
Copyright YourDogNeedsYou....
Common but avoidable dog
problems:
• excessive barking
• destruction
• aggression & dominance
• shyness or attention seeki...
• disobedience & not coming when called
• biting/nipping
• toileting inside the house
• digging
• noise phobias
• fear of ...
Most of these problems are the
result of the failure of the
owner to establish clear, fair
and easy to understand ground
r...
You can mould your puppy’s
behavior easily when it is still young.
You have the power to give your
puppy the best start to...
You can raise a great puppy! One
that is obedient, healthy and
secure.
I will now share easy, actionable
strategies you ca...
Confident dogs share the following characteristics:
• They are not alarmed by different or new noises
• They behave calmly...
The strategies I am about to share will help you
develop the confidence that comes with
knowing you are doing the right th...
Confident handling is surprisingly
simple. Here are some ways you can
handle your dog in a positive way.
Copyright YourDog...
Tip #1
Never shout at, or hit, your puppy.
Copyright YourDogNeedsYou.com 2010 - 2014.
Little smacks on the nose can cause
your puppy to become fearful. This
can lead to problems like biting or
aggression.
Cop...
Tip #2
Handle your puppy often; touch your
puppy’s paws, ears, tail and muzzle on a
daily basis.
Copyright YourDogNeedsYou...
If you desensitize your puppy’s paws
to your touch, your puppy will more
likely allow you to clip its nails or
examine its...
Tip #3
Handle your puppy on a table so it becomes
familiar with heights.
Copyright YourDogNeedsYou.com 2010 - 2014.
Tip #4
Handle your puppy and its food when
your puppy is eating.
Copyright YourDogNeedsYou.com 2010 - 2014.
Raising a confident puppy means it
must become familiar with
everyday sounds.
Fear of noises is a result of the dog
not be...
Tip #5
Have your dog listen to as many sounds
as possible.
Copyright YourDogNeedsYou.com 2010 - 2014.
Tip #6
Take your puppy out to busy
places, noisy indoor and outdoor
areas such as café’s, city areas or
freeways. If you c...
Thunder doesn’t happen on
command!
You can buy a ‘thunder maker’
cheaply from ebay.
Small instrument that makes
thunder no...
Free MP3 with the following sounds:
• Lawnmower & leaf blower
• Babies and children
• Phones
• Traffic - cars, trams, dirt...
Tip #7
Socialize your puppy with other
friendly puppies.
Copyright YourDogNeedsYou.com 2010 - 2014.
Your job is to protect, but not
mollycoddle, your puppy.
If your puppy is in danger, gently and calmly
remove your puppy, ...
WARNING: If your puppy has not yet
received its full course of
vaccinations, then avoid other adult
dogs and other places ...
In my next free virtual puppy class
(How to raise a healthy puppy), I’ll talk
about the correct vaccination schedule
for y...
Tip #8
Encourage your puppy to be friendly and
calm when greeting your friends and
family.
Copyright YourDogNeedsYou.com 2...
To ensure your puppy learns to be friendly
towards people, let it be handled by all sorts
of people frequently.
Copyright ...
Visitors to your home should only
handle your puppy with your
permission and when the puppy is
calm.
Copyright YourDogNeed...
The correct way to greet a puppy:
Offer an open palm under their dog’s
mouth. Then gently pat the puppy
under its chin and...
Tip #9
Ignore your puppy for 10 minutes
whenever you come home. Your puppy
will be more secure if you consistently
apply t...
This tip is one of the best ways to
ensure your dog does not develop
separation anxiety. Ignoring your dog
after you arriv...
Puppies thrive on routine and
consistency – it gives them security. If
you are inconsistent with your house
rules, you are...
Tip #10
Do not have your puppy sleep on your
bed, unless you are okay with it sleeping there
when fully grown.
Copyright Y...
If you allow your puppy to sleep on your
bed, then later try and change its sleeping
area, you’ll have a war on your hands...
Tip #11
Take your puppy to its toileting area often and
give your puppy an opportunity to potty in
that spot.
Copyright Yo...
Tip #12
Never punish your puppy for accidents inside
the house.
Copyright YourDogNeedsYou.com 2010 - 2014.
Tip #13
Make certain furniture off-limits from the start.
Later, you can teach your dog to jump on or off
your furniture o...
A puppy that receives conflicting
messages from its owner about
what is acceptable is likely to behave
erratically.
A secu...
Tip #14
Do not allow your puppy to bite or chew
your hands because this will become
annoying later. Simply redirect the
ch...
Tip #15
Never feed your puppy scraps as you
are sitting at the dinner table. This
will encourage begging behavior.
Copyrig...
If you’ve realised your puppy has
gotten away with ignoring some of
your rules so far – take heart – you
can start your ne...
Summary:
• Up until 16 weeks old, your puppy
will learn much from its
environment so provide positive
learning at this cri...
• Handle your puppy on a table so it
is not afraid of heights or the vet’s
examination table.
• Gently handle your dog and...
• Use your hands to gently manipulate
your dog into standing and lying
positions to show control & leadership
(ignore whim...
• Encourage calm and kind interaction
between your puppy and people
(including children).
• You and visitors should ignore...
• Expose your puppy to different
sounds such as my bonus
MP3, outdoor events and activities.
• Make sure the exposure is g...
• Allow your puppy to play with other
puppies regularly (under supervision).
• Allow boisterous play, but gently
remove pu...
• The correct way to pat a dog is
with an open palm under the dog’s
chin, gently patting the chest area.
• Redirect your p...
• Introduce your dog’s permanent bed
as soon as possible.
• Choose a potty area and encourage
your puppy to use that area....
Copyright YourDogNeedsYou.com 2010 - 2014.
Thanks for watching!
Please visit YourDogNeedsYou.com for more dog training tip...
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Puppy Class #1 How to Raise a Confident Puppy

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For more for puppy training tips and tools visit http://yourdogneedsyou.com.

What you do (or don't do) now can affect your puppy's confidence. This is because you only have a small window of opportunity (before 14-16 weeks old) where you can influence your puppy's view of the world around it. Therefore, before the puppy gets a little older you've really got to make sure you've set up your puppy to feel secure about the world.

This video will help you do just that...

So watch this video to discover:
- How your dog can become familiar with different people
- What to do about strange noises PLUS one weird tip that will get your dog familiar with thunder!
- How to allow your dog to like the vet and (dreaded) nail clipping
- Avoid food aggression
- How to teach your puppy not to jump on visitors
- Avoid separation anxiety
…and much more.

The video will walk you through the entire process of raising a confident puppy... if you have any questions, just let me know.

This class is the first of 3, the next two are: How to Raise a Healthy Puppy & How to Raise an Obedient Puppy. be sure to view all three!

Thanks for visiting!
Mia Montagliani
Dog Trainer
YourDogNeedsYou.com

Published in: Lifestyle, Education
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  • Hi, my name is Mia Montagliani and I’m the Director of Your Dog Needs You, an online provider of training and obedience resources for dog owners.
  • I am often asked by clients: “Why are puppy classes so important?” I always answer:A child’s view of the world is formed by the time they’re seven years old. A similar rule applies to puppies: at a young age puppies make lasting judgments about the world around them.
  • Its important for owners to understand that by the time puppies are just 16 weeks young they’ve decided what is good, bad, acceptable, unacceptable, scary and safe. This, in turn, determines the puppy’s reactions to the world around them.
  • Many times I have been called to help owners whose adult dogs are behaving badly: they bark too much or bark at other people and dogs unnecessarily, destroy things, potty inside, are too timid, or too bossy, they bite, pull on the lead, dig, attention-seeking, noise phobias, are stubborn, disobedient or just don’t listen.
  • Many times I have been called to help owners whose adult dogs are behaving badly: they bark too much or bark at other people and dogs unnecessarily, destroy things, potty inside, are too timid, or too bossy, they bite, pull on the lead, dig, attention-seeking, noise phobias, are stubborn, disobedient or just don’t listen.
  • Most of these problems are the result of one thing only: the failure of the owner to establish clear, fair and easy to understand ground rules from the start.(Parents tell me this is also the reason why children are naughty too!)
  • I always say to my clients that how you interact with your dog has the power to shape your dog’s behavior. But I hope you’ve also realised that the point I am emphasizing now is this: what you don’t do now can and will affect your puppy for a lifetime.After your puppy grows up, it is still possible to change your dog’s bad habits, but it can involve a lot more time and effort. When it comes to puppy behavior, prevention is much easier and less stressful than cure. You have the power to give your puppy the best start to life. So, now is the time to provide a positive learning environment
  • If you agree with me, then you can raise a great puppy. One that is obedient, healthy and secure. It’s my mission to help dog owners like you bring out the best in their dog. I am privileged to have coached many puppy owners both in my live classes and online. So for the next 15 minutes I promise to share with you easy, actionable strategies you can start using today to ensure your puppy grows up confident, secure and happy. Please take notes and put what I say into action.Are you ready?
  • Confident dogs share the following characteristics:They are not alarmed by different or new noisesThey behave calmly around otherdogsThey are generally friendly toward peopleThey follow ground rulesthat are enforced consistently
  • Your puppy can be taught to take life in its stride and be secure around people, dogs and noises. For your dog to be confident, firstly you must be confident and assertive when interacting with your dog. The strategies I am about to share will help you develop the confidence that comes with knowing you are doing the right thing by your puppy.
  • When it comes to assertive handling, dogs have an amazing ability to read your posture and mood. Your energy will either give your puppy confidence or take it away. As owner and leader, your puppy looks to you to handle any situation. If you’re often unsure, frustrated or angry with – or around - your puppy, you’ll raise an insecure dog. Insecure dogs often develop problems with shyness, incontinence orattention seeking. This can lead to your dog trying to become the leader (where your dog tests you) or your dog will become overly anxious and clingy. Confident handling is surprisingly simple. Here are some ways you can handle your dog in a positive way.
  • Never shout at, or hit, your puppy. This may sound common-sense, and it is, but many people forget this when they catch their puppy behaving badly. When I speak to owners many think that showing anger will stop the behavior, but they find it doesn’t so their anger is borne out of frustration with now knowing how to stop their puppy from doing certain things. Owners also fear that their puppy’s behavior will get worse and they won’t be able to enjoy their puppy. The reality is that puppies respond better to being guided and redirected towards better behavior. Your anger will only cause your puppy to fear you and become insecure and skittish as a result. Sometimes,dogs stop listening to their owner all together because they think they can never please their angry owner. This can make training near impossible. Here’s the good news: you can have the perfect puppy and there’ll never be any need to scold or smack it.
  • Some people have said that little smacks on the nose are effective in getting your message across, but these little smacks (even with a rolled-up newspaper) can cause your puppy to become fearful of hands and other objects – this can later cause problems if your dog bites – or nips at - people and children who are only trying to pat your dog on the face. If your puppy behaves badly, just be aware that there is a ground rule you have not established yet. Don’t blame yourself, just make a commitment to yourself that you will teach your puppy a new house rule from now on – I will talk about house rules later in this class as well as Puppy Class #3 where I talk about how to raise an obedient puppy.
  • Handle your puppy often; touch your puppy’s paws, ears, tail and muzzle on a regular basis. You can also gently manipulate your dog into lying on the ground or standing up. This type of handling gives your puppy the impression you’re in control. As you do this, ignore its whimpering as this is your puppy’s way of getting you to stop and so it ends up getting the upper hand over you! If your dog’s whimpering seems to be a result of injury or pain, then stop handling until the problem has been resolved by a vet.
  • Your puppy’s paws are particularly sensitive. Therefore, if you spend the time desensitizing them to your touch, your puppy will most likely allow you to clip its nails or examine its paws (in case of injury or a splinter) throughout its life. This will not only help prevent tussles with your dog, but also your dog being hurt by the nail clipper.
  • When handling your puppy, I suggest you sometimes do so on an elevated surface, such as a table. This will help your puppy become accustomed to heights. Reward calm behavior with affection and treats. In this way, your dog won’t be afraid of the vet’s examination table.
  • Also handle your puppy when its eating. In this way, your puppy will not develop the bad habit of guarding its food. (This is when your dog growls at you to ‘protect’ it food). You can also place your fingers in your puppy’s food bowl as its eating. Don’t allow anyone to taunt or tease your puppy whilst its eating – this will only encourage guarding and aggression.
  • As I mentioned before, raising a confident puppy involves it must becoming familiar with everyday sounds. Have you ever seen dogs freak out when they hear thunder, fireworks or other loud sounds? I have. It’s distressing for both dog and owner. This fear is a result of the dog not being given an opportunity to get used to these sounds when it was young. Sounds that comes from man-made things like vehicles, household appliances are not natural to the dog’s ear and can cause fear. Equally, I have seen an astonishing number of dogs become overly anxious and disorientated when they hear natural sounds like thunder and storms.
  • Here are three things you can do to get your dog used to different sounds:Have your dog listen to as many sounds as possible at a low volume. Slowly and gradually increase the volume as your dog becomes accustomed to these sounds. Increases must not be too quick as this will startle your dog and instil fear.
  • Also, take your puppy out to busy places, noisy indoor and outdoor areas such as café’s, city areas or freeways. Feed and play with your puppy during these times so it begins to associate these sounds with good times. Use opportunities like fireworks displays and actual thunderstorms to your advantage: expose your puppy to these events when you can – and when you do - feed and play with them so they see that these events are harmless and safe.
  • We all know that thunder does not happen when we necessarily want it too!You can buy a ‘thunder maker’ cheaply from ebay. I have seen some for about $15.By pulling on the wire and shaking the drum, a thunderous sound is produced. The pitch of the 'Thunder' can be changed by covering the opening with an open hand.
  • After this class, I’ll tell you how you can receive a free MP3 of the following sounds: Lawnmower, leaf blower, babies and children, phones, traffic - cars, trams, dirt bikes and trucks, thunderstorms, music, gun shots and artillery, door bells, vacuum cleaner, hair dryer, aeroplanes and fireworks.
  • Next, your puppy should become familiar with other dogs. Puppies that are not socialized with their own kind, are more likely to be timid, aggressive or overly boisterous with others as they grow up. This can make walks and visits to the dog park frustrating, embarrassing and scary. Dog fights might then occur, resulting in injury. Socializing your puppy is about giving them regular, and pleasant play time with other puppies. Play dates should always be supervised. You’ll find that other puppies may be bossy around your puppy. Boisterous play is normal and healthy.
  • It’s important not to be anxious about this, as your puppy will pick up on your vibes and may become anxious as well. Your job is to protect, but not mollycoddle, your puppy. So, if you see your puppy being overwhelmed to the point where it is causing your puppy anxiety then gently and calmly remove your puppy, and reintroduce it when the otherpuppies are calmer.
  • WARNING: Only socialise your puppy with other puppies in a clean, safe area. If your puppy has not yet received its full course of vaccinations, then avoid other adult dogs and other places frequented by adult dogs, such as dog parks. This is because your puppy’s immune system is still quite vulnerable to disease.
  • In my next free virtual puppy class (How to raise a healthy puppy), I’ll talk about the correct vaccination schedule for your puppy, and which diseases your puppy should be protected against.
  • Next, your dog should be friendly and calm when greeting your friends and family. If your puppy jumps up or goes crazy when it sees you or others coming, then you can have issues with incontinence (excited peeing) and unwanted jumping. Jumpy dogs can annoy your visitors. Remember, not all people will love your dog as much as you do!
  • To ensure your puppy learns to be friendly towards people, let it be handled by all sorts of people (men, women, tall, short etc) frequently. They should handle the puppy calmly, and not whip the puppy into an excited frenzy. Even allow children to handle your puppy (under your supervision).
  • Visitors to your home should only handle your puppy with your permission and when the puppy is calm. If the puppy is picked up when it is overly excited, your puppy will see this attention as approval for attention-seeking behavior. Your puppy will then become an attention-seeker, and annoy you and others with constant nudges.
  • The correct way to greet a puppy (which you can teach your visitors) is to offer an open palm under their dog’s mouth. Then gently pat the puppy under its chin and chest area. Patting a puppy on the face and head can be a little intimidating. Try patting yourself on your face with an open palm and you’ll see what I mean! Do not put your face close to the dog’s face – this might be seen as a threat. Recently a female reporter in the United States made headlines when she was bitten by a dog on live television – she had been patting the dog and she leaned her face closer to the dog as a gesture of closeness, but the dog bit her. The TV anchor needed extensive plastic surgery to fix the wounds to her face. This is a cautionary tale for anyone who loves dogs.
  • The next technique I am about to share is critical: to avoid crazy greetings between you and your puppy, you must ignore your puppy for 10 minutes whenever you come home. This rule can also be done with visitors. Ignoring your puppy might seem mean, but – believe me – when I say your puppy will be more secure if you consistently apply this technique.
  • This tip is one of the most best ways to ensure your dog does not develop separation anxiety. Ignoring your dog after you arrive home means your dog is less likely to fret in your absence. So, if you are ever tempted to break this rule, remember this technique alone may save you a lifetime of neighbours complaints about your dog barking or howling all day when you’re not home.
  • Puppies thrive on routine and consistency – it gives them security. If you are not consistent with your house rules, you are teaching your puppy that your rules are negotiable. That’s not a good thing! Your puppy should want to jump through hoops to please you, but inconsistency will result in your puppy testing you at every opportunity. This can make for a very frustrating relationship.
  • When deciding on your ground rules, consider: Where will the dog sleep?Its okay for your puppy to sleep in a safe, indoor area, at the start. Its important that your puppy is soon introduced to its permanent sleeping area. Do not have your puppy sleep on your bed, unless you are okay with it sleeping there when fully grown.
  • If you allow your puppy to sleep on your bed, then later try and change its sleeping area, you’ll have a war on your hands! Your puppy will whimper, bark and whine and scratch your door to get back its beloved spot on your bed! You’ll lose sleep and your temper - so save yourself the hassle!
  • Where will the dog potty?Its your job to teach your dog to potty outside. In my third virtual puppy class (How to raise an obedient puppy) I’ll share some effective ways for quick potty training. But for now, make sure your puppy knows where its ‘toilet’ is by taking it there often and giving your puppy an opportunity to potty in that spot. And when it does, reward your puppy with praise and treats.
  • Never punish your puppy for accidents inside the house. This is because the puppy will think its actual mess is the problem; your puppy will not realise that its being punished because it pottied inside. Because of this, your puppy will then try and hide the evidence by pottying behind furniture and curtains
  • What is off-limits?You may have certain furniture you do not want your puppy to use. Making this clear from the start will ensure your puppy develops good lifetimes habits, such as not jumping on furniture without your permission.Later, you can teach your dog to jump on or off your furniture on command.
  • What behavior will you not accept?Although some puppy behavior is cute, the novelty quickly wears off once the dog grows into adulthood. A puppy that receives conflicting messages from its owner about what is acceptable is likely to behave erratically. A secure puppy is one that knows early on what it can and cannot do and will be a calmer companion.
  • One behavior that should be discouraged is the chewing of fingers and hands. Do not allow your puppy to bite or chew your hands because this will become annoying later. Puppies teeth til about 4 months of age so its normal for puppies to want to chew. Simply redirect the chewing to hardy toys like small Kongs (pictured here) or Nylabones.
  • A critical ground rule you might want to use is to ensure you, your family and visitors never feed your puppy scraps as you are sitting at the dinner table. This will encourage begging behavior. Begging is an awful habit and is hard to break. Any scraps should be given at normal feeding times and placed in the dog’s food bowl.
  • If you’re watching this and you’ve realised your puppy has gotten away with ignoring some of your rules so far – take heart – you can start your new rules today. Your dog may test you for a little while, andyour new-found persistence will pay off with a lifetime of good behavior.
  • I know I have given you alot of information, so I am going to quickly recap the key action points that will allow you to raise a confident puppy. They are: up until 16 weeks old, your puppy will learn muchfrom its environment so provide positive learning at this critical stage of life; gently handle your puppy often – especially its paws, ears, muzzle and tail.
  • Also handle your puppy on a table so it is not afraid of heights or the vet’s table;gently handle your dog and its food whilst its eating (to prevent food guarding)
  • Use your hands to gently manipulate your dog into standing and lying positions to show control & leadership (ignore whimpers); never ever hit, yell or get angry at your puppy (this could create insecurity, timidity, defiance or a complete shut down to learning); expose your puppy to different people.
  • Encourage calm and kind interaction between your puppy and people (including children);you and visitors should ignore your puppy until it is calm; when arriving home, wait 10 minutes before greeting your puppy (this helps avoid separation anxiety)
  • Expose your puppy to different sounds such as my bonus MP3, outdoor events and activities; Make sure the exposure is gradual by slowing increasing volumes or decreasing the distance between the puppy and noise make the experience pleasant with praise and treats
  • Allow your puppy to play with other puppies regularly (under supervision); Allow boisterous play, but gently remove puppy if the play gets too rough;Do not expose your puppy to adult dogs or areas where dogs go until it is fully vaccinated
  • Introduce your dog’s permanent bed as soon as possible; Choose a potty area and encourage your puppy to use that area; Do not punish your puppy for potty accidents – they will happen!; Never feed your puppy scraps from the dinner table – this will encourage begging.
  • Remember to share your thoughts in the comment section below so your facebook friends with new puppies have an opportunity to access this video.
  • Puppy Class #1 How to Raise a Confident Puppy

    1. 1. Copyright YourDogNeedsYou.com 2010 - 2014.
    2. 2. How to raise a confident puppy Puppy Class # 1 Copyright YourDogNeedsYou.com 2010 - 2014.
    3. 3. Mia Montagliani YourDogNeedsYou.com Puppy training tips and tools Copyright YourDogNeedsYou.com 2010 - 2014.
    4. 4. Why are puppy classes so important? Because puppies make lasting judgments about the world around them. Copyright YourDogNeedsYou.com 2010 - 2014.
    5. 5. By 16 weeks, puppies have decided what is good, bad, acceptable, unacce ptable, scary and safe. Copyright YourDogNeedsYou.com 2010 - 2014.
    6. 6. Common but avoidable dog problems: • excessive barking • destruction • aggression & dominance • shyness or attention seeking • lead pulling Copyright YourDogNeedsYou.com 2010 - 2014.
    7. 7. • disobedience & not coming when called • biting/nipping • toileting inside the house • digging • noise phobias • fear of fireworks and thunder Copyright YourDogNeedsYou.com 2010 - 2014.
    8. 8. Most of these problems are the result of the failure of the owner to establish clear, fair and easy to understand ground rules from the start. Copyright YourDogNeedsYou.com 2010 - 2014.
    9. 9. You can mould your puppy’s behavior easily when it is still young. You have the power to give your puppy the best start to life. So, now is the time to provide a positive learning environment. Copyright YourDogNeedsYou.com 2010 - 2014.
    10. 10. You can raise a great puppy! One that is obedient, healthy and secure. I will now share easy, actionable strategies you can start using today to ensure your puppy grows up confident, secure and happy. Copyright YourDogNeedsYou.com 2010 - 2014.
    11. 11. Confident dogs share the following characteristics: • They are not alarmed by different or new noises • They behave calmly around other dogs • They are generally friendly toward people • They follow ground rules that are enforced consistently Copyright YourDogNeedsYou.com 2010 - 2014.
    12. 12. The strategies I am about to share will help you develop the confidence that comes with knowing you are doing the right thing by your puppy. Copyright YourDogNeedsYou.com 2010 - 2014.
    13. 13. Confident handling is surprisingly simple. Here are some ways you can handle your dog in a positive way. Copyright YourDogNeedsYou.com 2010 - 2014.
    14. 14. Tip #1 Never shout at, or hit, your puppy. Copyright YourDogNeedsYou.com 2010 - 2014.
    15. 15. Little smacks on the nose can cause your puppy to become fearful. This can lead to problems like biting or aggression. Copyright YourDogNeedsYou.com 2010 - 2014.
    16. 16. Tip #2 Handle your puppy often; touch your puppy’s paws, ears, tail and muzzle on a daily basis. Copyright YourDogNeedsYou.com 2010 - 2014.
    17. 17. If you desensitize your puppy’s paws to your touch, your puppy will more likely allow you to clip its nails or examine its paws (in case of injury or a splinter). Copyright YourDogNeedsYou.com 2010 - 2014.
    18. 18. Tip #3 Handle your puppy on a table so it becomes familiar with heights. Copyright YourDogNeedsYou.com 2010 - 2014.
    19. 19. Tip #4 Handle your puppy and its food when your puppy is eating. Copyright YourDogNeedsYou.com 2010 - 2014.
    20. 20. Raising a confident puppy means it must become familiar with everyday sounds. Fear of noises is a result of the dog not being given an opportunity to get familiar with these sounds when it was still a puppy. Copyright YourDogNeedsYou.com 2010 - 2014.
    21. 21. Tip #5 Have your dog listen to as many sounds as possible. Copyright YourDogNeedsYou.com 2010 - 2014.
    22. 22. Tip #6 Take your puppy out to busy places, noisy indoor and outdoor areas such as café’s, city areas or freeways. If you can, expose your puppy to fireworks displays and actual thunderstorms. Copyright YourDogNeedsYou.com 2010 - 2014.
    23. 23. Thunder doesn’t happen on command! You can buy a ‘thunder maker’ cheaply from ebay. Small instrument that makes thunder noises – quick and easy to use. Copyright YourDogNeedsYou.com 2010 - 2014.
    24. 24. Free MP3 with the following sounds: • Lawnmower & leaf blower • Babies and children • Phones • Traffic - cars, trams, dirt bikes & trucks • Thunderstorms & fireworks • Music • Gun shots and artillery • Door bells, vacuum cleaner & hair dryer • Aeroplanes Copyright YourDogNeedsYou.com 2010 - 2014.
    25. 25. Tip #7 Socialize your puppy with other friendly puppies. Copyright YourDogNeedsYou.com 2010 - 2014.
    26. 26. Your job is to protect, but not mollycoddle, your puppy. If your puppy is in danger, gently and calmly remove your puppy, and reintroduce it when the other puppies are calmer. Copyright YourDogNeedsYou.com 2010 - 2014.
    27. 27. WARNING: If your puppy has not yet received its full course of vaccinations, then avoid other adult dogs and other places frequented by adult dogs, such as dog parks. Copyright YourDogNeedsYou.com 2010 - 2014.
    28. 28. In my next free virtual puppy class (How to raise a healthy puppy), I’ll talk about the correct vaccination schedule for your puppy, and which diseases your puppy should be protected against. Copyright YourDogNeedsYou.com 2010 - 2014.
    29. 29. Tip #8 Encourage your puppy to be friendly and calm when greeting your friends and family. Copyright YourDogNeedsYou.com 2010 - 2014.
    30. 30. To ensure your puppy learns to be friendly towards people, let it be handled by all sorts of people frequently. Copyright YourDogNeedsYou.com 2010 - 2014.
    31. 31. Visitors to your home should only handle your puppy with your permission and when the puppy is calm. Copyright YourDogNeedsYou.com 2010 - 2014.
    32. 32. The correct way to greet a puppy: Offer an open palm under their dog’s mouth. Then gently pat the puppy under its chin and chest area. Do not put your face close to the dog’s face – this might be seen as a threat. Copyright YourDogNeedsYou.com 2010 - 2014.
    33. 33. Tip #9 Ignore your puppy for 10 minutes whenever you come home. Your puppy will be more secure if you consistently apply this technique. Copyright YourDogNeedsYou.com 2010 - 2014.
    34. 34. This tip is one of the best ways to ensure your dog does not develop separation anxiety. Ignoring your dog after you arrive home means your dog is less likely to fret in your absence. Copyright YourDogNeedsYou.com 2010 - 2014.
    35. 35. Puppies thrive on routine and consistency – it gives them security. If you are inconsistent with your house rules, you are teaching your puppy that your rules are negotiable. Copyright YourDogNeedsYou.com 2010 - 2014.
    36. 36. Tip #10 Do not have your puppy sleep on your bed, unless you are okay with it sleeping there when fully grown. Copyright YourDogNeedsYou.com 2010 - 2014.
    37. 37. If you allow your puppy to sleep on your bed, then later try and change its sleeping area, you’ll have a war on your hands! Your puppy will whimper, bark and whine and scratch your door to get back its beloved spot on your bed! You’ll lose sleep and your temper - so save yourself the hassle! Copyright YourDogNeedsYou.com 2010 - 2014.
    38. 38. Tip #11 Take your puppy to its toileting area often and give your puppy an opportunity to potty in that spot. Copyright YourDogNeedsYou.com 2010 - 2014.
    39. 39. Tip #12 Never punish your puppy for accidents inside the house. Copyright YourDogNeedsYou.com 2010 - 2014.
    40. 40. Tip #13 Make certain furniture off-limits from the start. Later, you can teach your dog to jump on or off your furniture on command. Copyright YourDogNeedsYou.com 2010 - 2014.
    41. 41. A puppy that receives conflicting messages from its owner about what is acceptable is likely to behave erratically. A secure puppy is one that knows early on what it can and cannot do and will be a calmer companion. Copyright YourDogNeedsYou.com 2010 - 2014.
    42. 42. Tip #14 Do not allow your puppy to bite or chew your hands because this will become annoying later. Simply redirect the chewing to hardy toys like small Kongs or Nylabones. Copyright YourDogNeedsYou.com 2010 - 2014.
    43. 43. Tip #15 Never feed your puppy scraps as you are sitting at the dinner table. This will encourage begging behavior. Copyright YourDogNeedsYou.com 2010 - 2014.
    44. 44. If you’ve realised your puppy has gotten away with ignoring some of your rules so far – take heart – you can start your new rules today. Your new-found persistence will pay off with a lifetime of good behavior! Copyright YourDogNeedsYou.com 2010 - 2014.
    45. 45. Summary: • Up until 16 weeks old, your puppy will learn much from its environment so provide positive learning at this critical stage of life. • Gently handle your puppy often – especially its paws, ears, muzzle and tail. Copyright YourDogNeedsYou.com 2010 - 2014.
    46. 46. • Handle your puppy on a table so it is not afraid of heights or the vet’s examination table. • Gently handle your dog and its food whilst its eating (to prevent food guarding). Copyright YourDogNeedsYou.com 2010 - 2014.
    47. 47. • Use your hands to gently manipulate your dog into standing and lying positions to show control & leadership (ignore whimpers). • Never ever hit, yell or get angry at your puppy (this could create insecurity, timidity, defiance or a complete shut down to learning). • Expose your puppy to different people. Copyright YourDogNeedsYou.com 2010 - 2014.
    48. 48. • Encourage calm and kind interaction between your puppy and people (including children). • You and visitors should ignore your puppy until it is calm. • When arriving home, wait 10 minutes before greeting your puppy (this helps avoid separation anxiety). Copyright YourDogNeedsYou.com 2010 - 2014.
    49. 49. • Expose your puppy to different sounds such as my bonus MP3, outdoor events and activities. • Make sure the exposure is gradual by slowing increasing volumes or decreasing the distance between the puppy and noise. • Make all experiences pleasant with praise and treats. Copyright YourDogNeedsYou.com 2010 - 2014.
    50. 50. • Allow your puppy to play with other puppies regularly (under supervision). • Allow boisterous play, but gently remove puppy if the play gets too rough. • Do not expose your puppy to adult dogs or areas where dogs go until it is fully vaccinated. Copyright YourDogNeedsYou.com 2010 - 2014.
    51. 51. • The correct way to pat a dog is with an open palm under the dog’s chin, gently patting the chest area. • Redirect your puppy’s chewing of your fingers to hardy toys (like Kongs). • Decide on your ground rules early and stick to them. Copyright YourDogNeedsYou.com 2010 - 2014.
    52. 52. • Introduce your dog’s permanent bed as soon as possible. • Choose a potty area and encourage your puppy to use that area. • Do not punish your puppy for potty accidents – they will happen! • Never feed your puppy scraps from the dinner table – this will encourage begging. Copyright YourDogNeedsYou.com 2010 - 2014.
    53. 53. Copyright YourDogNeedsYou.com 2010 - 2014. Thanks for watching! Please visit YourDogNeedsYou.com for more dog training tips and resources

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