Smart Utopia? book launch presentation

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The rise of smart energy technologies is transforming all aspects of social life. This presentation critically interrogates the global utopian vision for smart energy and the ultimate consumer - Resource Man - who is intended to realise its aims.

Book launch presentation for Yolande Strengers' book 'Smart energy technologies in everyday life', Palgrave Macmillan, http://www.palgrave.com/products/title.aspx?pid=627816

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  • Please feel free to use your smart phone technologies during talk
    Mention Twitter ‘experiment’
    Slides available via Twitter and later on BBC website
    My book is about the people intended to use smart energy technologies and vision for these technologies but it is also about how smart energy technologies are being used in everyday life.
    Really just going to give you a little introduction into that world today.
  • RMIT – VC fellowship
    GUSS and CUR – thanks for launch
    Rose, Sarah, Alan and Ralph for graciously accepting my request to be involved in this launch. Interesting things to say.
    Colleague Cecily Maller and also Professor Gay Hawkins Uni Queensland who couldn’t be here today, for helping me write this book and develop some of the key concepts and ideas
    My colleagues in the Beyond Behaviour Change research program, particularly Cecily Maller and Larissa Nicholls, who I work with on related projects.
    And my husband Ben Goodall, who is here today, for his emotional support and for seemingly endless conversations on this topic.
  • Please feel free to use your smart phone technologies during talk
    Mention Twitter ‘experiment’
    Slides available via Twitter and later on BBC website
    My book is about the people intended to use smart energy technologies and vision for these technologies but it is also about how smart energy technologies are being used in everyday life.
    Really just going to give you a little introduction into some of the key concepts developed in the book today.
  • My empirical research has been with households.
    That means I sit down, or one of my colleagues sits down, with households, at their home, we have a chat about how they live. Sometimes we also talk about energy and water, but the focus is really on what they do.
    We also walk around their homes and sometimes take photos of various practices or objects in action.
    My Phd was on how various smart metering strategies were changing comfort and cleanliness practices in the home, particularly laundering, house cleaning, bathing, heating and cooling
    This book is informed by this empirical research, but it’s also informed by a now global body of research on smart energy technologies.
  • What are smart energy technologies?
    Smart grids and meters – same as ‘dumb’ meters and grids only have ICT capability
    Characterised by two-way communication
    Aim is to for smart grids and meters use information and communication technologies to gather and act on information in order to efficiently, reliably and sustainably manage the demand and supply of electricity.
    Nearly all developed and some developing nations have smart grid trials and many have smart metering mandates in place
    Enabling strategies and technologies
    Energy feedback, smart appliances, dynamic/ flexible pricing programs, micro-generation, electric vehicles
    Not that any of these techs new – but popularised and made more widely available through smart meters, grids and the vision for them
  • The book is about the productive vision for these technologies.
    Productive in the sense that it aims to produce a certain type of reality and solve a range of problems
    Address peak demand on very hot days
    Decarbonise the electricity system through greater efficiency and greater uptake of renewable generation
    Secure electricity supply from foreign energy reserves and through early detection of problems in the electricity system
    Enable greater uptake of new smart technologies and strategies and in doing so
    Empower consumers to participate in energy demand management – become prosumers as well as to better reduce energy consumption and shift away from those peak times
    Realise a ‘smart lifestyle’ where sustainability and resource management is achieved through greater use of technology and data.
  • This smart lifestyle is not new, and neither is this utopian vision
    Remarkably similar to Utopian visions from the past, that promised to deliver a better life through technology and electricity.
    Westinghouse’s Total Electric Homes invites us to ‘Imagine this’
  • Likewise today, smart energy technology is full of utopian promises for the future
    About making our lives simpler, easier and more efficient through the better use of electricity.
  • Why this is important is because Utopian visions have never eventuated as planned.
    Utopian scholars talk about how the future is always ‘just over the horizon’ but never within our reach.
    But these visions are also productive: they aim to realise or do something – in this case solve energy problems while improving our lives
    But because they often represent such a distorted vision of reality, they can have unintended consequences.
    Good example of this is Ruth Schwartz Cowans book on industry revolution of home in 20th Century which showed how labour-saving devices contributed towards elevated standards of cleanliness and convience, creating ‘more work for mother’.
  • The energy consumer, or what is now known as the New or Smart energy consumers, is absolutely central to achieving this vision.
    Language in consumer research and government reports very revealing in this regard.
  • In my international review of policy and consumer research reports I found a very specific vision for the smart or new energy consumer.
    I named this consumer Resource Man.
    Here’s an example of one here.
  • Harper-Slaboszewicz sums up vision for energy consumers here.
    READ QUOTE
    The goal then, is to enable energy consumers to become micro-resource managers of what Zoe Sofoulis calls ‘Mini-Me’ versions of their utility providers.
  • Resource Man is of course not a new concept or consumer characterisation. He is closely related to many other human characterisations that have long since pervaded the social sciences.
    I conceptualise him as the son of Rational economic Man - Making rational cost-benefit decisions about energy consumption
    Also closely related to:
    Homo optionis – Choice Man
    Choosing energy tools and options
    Homo sociologicus – Social Man
    Sharing and comparing energy data with other resource men
    Homo faber – Tool Man
    Using technologies and tools to manage energy consumption
    l’homme moyen – Average or Normal Man
    It is ‘normal’ to manage energy through technology and data
    French?
  • When analysts talk about this new wave of customer engagement they are generally referring to one of two strategies intended to realise the RM vision.
  • This is about putting RM in control of his energy consumption.
    Education, information, choices and decisions are critical concepts here.
  • Second is about Resource Man assigning management of his resource consumption to technology.
    Concepts of ‘cruise control’ and ‘set and forget’ prevalent here.
    Idea is that Resource Man doesn’t want to think about his energy consumption daily, so he assigns that job to technology, which automates the temperature in the room, lighting options, or when the washing should go on etc.
    Key technologies here are automation technologies, like smart appliances and smart thermostats.
    What’s interesting is that both of this strategies are part of the Resource Man vision and they’re often talked about together, as part of a united strategy to realise the smart energy consumer
  • What this Resource Man vision and these smart strategies are doing is performing a smart reality
    In which all human action and social change is mediated by data and technology
  • This is self-reproducing reality
    Consumers are asked about data and technology, their answers produce data about data and technology (like these examples), this justifies the continual focus on data and technology, and provides the basis for utilities to build programs that are based on data technology.
  • The Resource Man vision and the two strategies I introduced are also promoting a very specific understanding or definition of energy.
    Energy is defined as a commodity (money), resource (kilowatt hours) or impact (climate change/ environment)
  • This is clearly evident in the sorts of names that are given to smart strategies intended for Resource Man.
    Names are revealing (PowerHog, Kill A Watt, Ecometer etc.)
    Energy is defined here as something we purchase, a resource or an impact
  • Now quite a lot of evidence to suggest that this vision is not connecting with all energy consumers. It’s still an unfulfilled reality
    READ QUOTES
    The response to this has been to come back to those two strategies of educating and empowering consumers or providing them with the right energy tools in order to realise Resource Man.
    However, I think there are some other reasons why this vision has not yet been realised.
  • And mostly I argue that it’s about what’s missing from this vision.
  • One thing that’s missing is laundry.
    Energy as a commodity, resource, impact doesn’t really feature here at all, even though doing the laundry uses quite a lot of energy (and water)
    Same could be true of many everyday practice.
    What these pictures also demonstrate is missing from the Smart Utopia is dirty, messy and domesticated activity.
    Sensory experience and feedback– sniff or smell clothing and laundry to test if it’s dirty, smelly
    Household dynamics – who controls the thermostat/ who does the laundry?
  • The practices that actually produce resource consumption are changing
    And they’re changing is ways that aren’t always or only about data and technology or changing understandings of energy as a commodity, resource or impact.
  • Who is missing from this very middle class, caucasian, trouble free vision of home life?
  • Busy women, still do most of domestic labour in home
    More specifically, domestic labour missing – the majority of which is still performed by women
  • Troublesome teenagers, renowned for excessive energy use and experimenting with many new practices.
  • Babies and their particular ‘needs’, like needs for coolth/
  • Cats and dogs and their new energy ‘needs’
    Anyone interested in pet energy use should google ‘iphone games for cats’ when they have a free minute
  • What’s essentially hapening here is that we’re taking people out of everyday life, and thinking about them as micro-resource managers.
  • Part II of the book looks at the opposite. What happens when these technologies encounter everyday lif.
  • Part II looks at 4 smart energy strategies.
    Draws mainly on qualitative empirical research with households.
    Studies from UK, Europe US and Australia where social researchers have sought to understand how these technologies are being used in everyday life.
    That’s where these technologies are being used.
    For that you will have to read the book!
  • I conclude the book by talking about the need to reimagine the Smart Utopia.
    And part of that involves moving beyond what I call the smart containment lines.
  • This means thinking about how to design smart energy technologies and strategies to support everyday life
    But also means thinking about how we might support more sustainable or energy-efficient laundry and everyday practices without any smart technology it all.
    This might not have anything to do with data, technology or about educating people about energy as a commodity, resource unit or impact.
    It might have more to do with changing the built infrastructure of homes to support cool homes or attempting to change ideas about what kinds of air (artificial or natural) are good for our health, understandings around what it means to produce clean clothes etc., or how and when its appropriate to perform certain practices and use certain appliances.
    It also involves thinking about the dynamics of how practices change, and then looking for opportunities to intervene in those processes.
    That’s really the work that we do in the Beyond Behaviour Change research program
  • We should also care because the Smart Utopian vision not just trying to make ways of life more efficient through technology and data.
    It’s also promoting new ways of life, and it’s doing this in quite explicit ways.
    It’s also doing this in ways that we have seen before and that have served to increase our expectations for energy in the past.
    For example, Westinghouse’s ‘Total Electric Home’ says that first impressions are ‘warm and friendly’ …
    New expectations of electrically-enabled entertainment, security and comfort being promoted here.
  • Fast forward again to the 21st Century, we see similar productive work being done in this example from Control4 automation.
    ‘Once you have smart lighting, in your home, it is hard to imagine living without it.’
    It’s easy to see how the outcome of this vision may be to increase energy, not reduce it.
    What Control4 are really doing here is offering new expectations of comfort, convenience, security, entertainment, and those expectations have energy implications.
    In focusing on Resource Man, and in particular on energy, data and technology we ignore these explicit attempts being made by Utopian visions like this one to change the ways we live, and we overlook the ways in which smart energy technologies are being enrolled to promote these visions.
  • What we’re now seeing is the promotion of a new and more energy-intensive smart lifestyle under the guise of resource efficiency and greater control.
    Sony automation explicitly talks about ‘elevating your standards’ in ways that electricity is intimately bound up in.
    For example, Sony automation allows you to ‘warm up your Jacuzzi for the arrival home’, which to more than half the world’s population, is a very utopian aspiration indeed.
    Lutron promotes a new form of ‘electrically-enabled pleasance’, that enhances comfort, romance and peace of mind.
    Here we see ideals of luxury and modernity and efficiency being advocated in which electricity, or rather more electricity is absolutely central.
    At the same time, automation techs are being marketed as resource efficient and energy-saving techs.
    Electricity features here, but not as a commodity, resource or impact.
  • Reason to be cautious and optimistic about future smart energy technologies.
    My book depicts the vision for smart energy technologies as a global utopian vision, not to completely dismiss it, but to shine the light on the productive work of this vision, the sorts of reality/ies it seeks to realise, and whether this is the only and best way to achieve the aims it sets out to achieve: decarbonisation, reduced peak demand.
    There is a lot of work to do in reimagining this global vision and broadening out its focus on Resource Man and on his relationship with data, technology and energy.
    Also lot of work to be done in realising how new forms of energy consumption are being implicitly and explicitly promoted in visions for the smart home and for smart energy technologies, and thinking through how to promote new expectations of comfort, cleanliness, entertainment and security that don’t necessarily involve using more electricity.
    And if I were to start beginning some of that necessary work….
  • …then this is where I would begin.
  • Smart Utopia? book launch presentation

    1. 1. Smart Utopia? Public seminar and book launch Book available from: http://us.macmillan.com/smartener gytechnologiesineverydaylife/Yolan deStrengers
    2. 2. Welcome Professor Ralph Horne Deputy Pro Vice Chancellor, Research & Innovation College of Design and Social Context
    3. 3. Smart Utopia? Yolande Strengers Beyond Behaviour Change Research Program Centre for Urban Research Twitter: @yolandestreng @RMIT_CUR #smartutopia #resourceman
    4. 4. Thanks • RMIT University – School of Global Urban Social Studies, Centre for Urban Research • Rose Read, Sarah Pink, Alan Pears, Ralph Horne • Cecily Maller and Gay Hawkins • Beyond Behaviour Change research program • Ben Goodall RMIT University © 2013 School of Global Urban and Social Studies 4
    5. 5. Smart Utopia? Yolande Strengers Beyond Behaviour Change Research Program Centre for Urban Research Twitter: @yolandestreng @RMIT_CUR #smartutopia #resourceman
    6. 6. I am not an ‘energy’ expert RMIT University © 2013 School of Global Urban and Social Studies 6
    7. 7. I am not a ‘technology’ expert RMIT University © 2013 School of Global Urban and Social Studies 7
    8. 8. I do know a lot about everyday practices RMIT University © 2013 School of Global Urban and Social Studies 8
    9. 9. Smart energy technologies Image sources: http://news.techworld.com http://www.prlog.org/103396 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/S http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/E RMIT University © 2013 School of Global Urban and Social Studies 9
    10. 10. What is Smart Utopia? • The international vision for smart energy technologies, in which the social and environmental problems facing the electricity sector are solved through data and technology. • Advocated globally by: – Governments; electricity providers; technology designers and manufacturers; consumer research groups; engineers, economists, some consumers • Intended to: – Address peak electricity demand – Decarbonise the electricity system – Secure electricity supply – Enable greater uptake of renewable generation, electric vehicles, microgrids and other ICT technologies – Empower consumers to participate in energy demand management – Realise a ‘smart lifestyle’ RMIT University © 2013 School of Global Urban and Social Studies 10
    11. 11. A vision from the past Westinghouse’s ‘Total Electric Home’ “Imagine this: Total Electric Living... where electricity does absolutely everything: heats, air conditions, cooks, preserves food, lights, entertains, encourages hobbies, makes it the easiest way ever for you and your family to be happier, healthier, to live fuller lives” Source: http://thriftshopromantic.blogspot.com.au/2008/06/futures-so-bright-inside-1950s-total.html RMIT University © 2013 School of Global Urban and Social Studies 11
    12. 12. A vision for our future • Control4 home automation: ‘Imagine a house that remembers to lock itself at 10 pm. Shades that close as the sun hits. A home theater setup that takes care of lights, sound and picture with one touch. With Control4, everything works together the way you want it to. Life is just better with a little more control’. Source: http://www.control4.com/info/main-street-america RMIT University © 2013 School of Global Urban and Social Studies 12
    13. 13. •Utopian visions have never eventuated as planned •They are productive: they aim to do something (in this case solving energy problems whilst improving our lives) ! ng i rn a W •Utopian visions have unintended consequences RMIT University © 2013 School of Global Urban and Social Studies 13
    14. 14. The smart energy consumer •‘The rise of the New Energy Consumer will ultimately become the driving force behind the Smart Grid and the Green Economy of the Future‘ (Zpryme, 2011: 1) •The new energy consumer will ‘unlock the vast potential of the smart grid’ ( CEA 2011: i). •The smart energy consumer is transformative in realising the smart energy vision RMIT University © 2013 School of Global Urban and Social Studies 14
    15. 15. Who is the smart energy consumer? RESOURCE MAN Kevin Nolan, vice president of technology at GE's Consumer & Industrial unit, shows off GE's demand response appliances and Home Energy Manager at GE's smart grid symposium at its Global Research Center in upstate New York. Source: http://news.cnet.com/8301-11128_3-10286278-54.html RMIT University © 2013 School of Global Urban and Social Studies 15
    16. 16. Resource Man: the ideal energy consumer • Educated in resource management concepts (kilowatt hours, greenhouse gas emissions) • Interested in energy data and resource management concepts (e.g. uses an in-home display or web portal) • Techno-savvy and technologically-enabled in managing his energy consumption (e.g. he has smart appliances, micro-generation and home energy management systems) • Assigns management of his energy to technology • Responds rationally to pricing signals (or his appliances do) • Makes appropriate choices about the ‘right’ energy options to suit his needs RMIT University © 2013 School of Global Urban and Social Studies 16
    17. 17. Resource Man: individual and gendered • Operates largely independently and individually • Makes decisions on behalf of his household • Shares his resource management data with other ‘resource men’ through social networking sites • Constructed in the image of the male-dominated professions of the electricity sector (engineering, economics, technology) • Consumer data shows that the smart energy consumer is more likely to be male Image source: http://www.globalgiants.com/archives/power_engineering_petro/index2.html RMIT University © 2013 School of Global Urban and Social Studies 17
    18. 18. Micro-resource managers •‘The goal isn't to move utilities into our living room—rather it's to allow consumers to take advantage of some of the same technologies utilities are finding useful in smart metering and monitoring/ managing the distribution grid’ (Harper-Slaboszewicz et al. 2012: 34) Householders to become micro-resource managers or ‘Mini-Me’ versions of their utility providers (Sofoulis 2011) Mini Me is a character in the second and third Austin Powers movies: Austin Powers: The Spy Who Shagged Me and Austin Powers in Goldmember Image Source: http://www.allposters.com/-sp/Mini-Me-II-Austin-Powers-III-Posters_i8563546_.htm RMIT University © 2013 School of Global Urban and Social Studies 18
    19. 19. Family tree Rational economic man Homo economicus Choice Man Homo optionis Social Man Homo sociologicus Tool Man Homo faber Normal/ Average Man L’homme moyen Resource Man Homo facultas RMIT University © 2013 School of Global Urban and Social Studies 19
    20. 20. Making Resource Man a reality TWO STRATEGIES (involving energy data and technology) RMIT University © 2013 School of Global Urban and Social Studies 20
    21. 21. 1. Resource Man in control Utilities need to ‘empower consumers’ (OSTP 2012) to ‘take control’ (CEA 2011) of their consumption and make ‘informed choices’ (AEMC 2011) about how they use energy. RMIT University © 2013 School of Global Urban and Social Studies 21
    22. 22. Resource Man in control: Getting ‘energy fit’ • Electricity utilities are helping their energy consumers become ‘energy fit’ (SGA 2011: 34) and ‘active’ (Accenture 2010: 37) • The critical goal for energy providers is to develop ‘a new value proposition that convinces consumers that extra effort is worthwhile’ (Accenture 2010: 4). The active consumer RMIT University © 2013 School of Global Urban and Social Studies 22
    23. 23. Getting energy fit: Tools of the trade RMIT University © 2013 School of Global, Urban and Social Studies 23
    24. 24. 2. Assigning control to technology: ‘cruise control’ and ‘set and forget' The passive consumer Image sources: http://news.techworld.com/personal-tech/3377043/panasonic-air-conditioners-and-washing-machines-controlled-by-android-app http://bits.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/04/22/nest-labs-reaches-for-a-new-market/?_r=0 RMIT University © 2013 School of Global, Urban and Social Studies 24
    25. 25. Performing a smart reality • All human action and social change mediated by data and technology (ICT) RMIT University © 2013 School of Global Urban and Social Studies 25
    26. 26. A self-reproducing smart reality ‘67% of consumers definitely (28%) or probably (39%) would participate in a Smart Energy Data Management program’ (Smart Grid Consumer Collaborative 2012: 16) Almost half of Americas (48%) would like to install a ‘dashboard’ in their home in order to ‘proactively manage their energy use’ (Harris 2012). RMIT University © 2013 Over 90% of 5000 respondents surveyed for IBM’s 2008 Global Utility Consumer Survey indicated they would like a smart meter and associated tools to manage their usage (Valocchi et al. 2009). School of Global Urban and Social Studies 26
    27. 27. Smart energy • Energy defined as a commodity ($), resource (kWh) or impact (CO2). RMIT University © 2013 School of Global Urban and Social Studies 27
    28. 28. Kill A Watt Meter Clock Energy-saving washing machine http://www.1010global.org/uk/2013/01/wha t-does-eco-button-do Ambient Energy Orb http://www.p3international.com/prod ucts/p4400.html http://www.ambientdevices.com/about/ energy-devices Smart phone energy aps https://www.sticknfind.com/MeterPlug/ tweet-a-watt a twittering power meter PowerHog Energy Meter http://www.bresslergroup.com/work/details/145/powerhogenergy-meter http://www.1010global.org/uk/2013/01/what-doeseco-button-do Ecometer in-home energy monitor (Landis & Gyr) http://www.econtrols.co.uk/products/smartmeters-in-home-energy-monitor/ RMIT University © 2013 School of Global Urban and Social Studies 28
    29. 29. An unfulfilled reality ‘Many ‘67% of consumers definitely (28%) or probably (39%) would participate in a Smart Energy Data Management program’ (Smart Grid Consumer Collaborative 2012: 16) ‘Over 30% of consumers have not even heard the term ‘dollar per kwh’ (or the equivalent currency), and over 60% did not know what the terms ‘smart meter’ or ‘smart grid’ mean’ (Valocchi & Juliano 2012: 6) Almost half of Americas (48%) would like to install a ‘dashboard’ in their home in order to ‘proactively manage their energy use’ (Harris 2012). RMIT University © 2013 consumers around the globe do not understand the basic unit of electricity pricing and other concepts used by energy providers’ (IBM 2011: 1) Over 90% of 5000 respondents surveyed for IBM’s 2008 Global Utility Consumer Survey indicated they would like a smart meter and associated tools to manage their usage (Valocchi et al. 2009). Consumers have been ‘less enthusiastic about smart meters than utilities originally anticipated’ (Vyas & Gohn 2012: 1) School of Global Urban and Social Studies 29
    30. 30. WHAT’S MISSING? RMIT University © 2013 School of Global Urban and Social Studies 30
    31. 31. Laundry RMIT University © 2013 School of Global Urban and Social Studies 31
    32. 32. Why should we care about laundry (and other practices)? • Clothes washing has become more frequent over last 50-100 years (Slob & Verbeek 2006) • Showering once a day only became common in last 50-80 years (Davidson 2008). Now more frequent? • Air-con penetration has almost doubled since 1990s. Now almost 75% of Australian households have some form of mechanical cooling (ABS 2013). RMIT University © 2013 School of Global Urban and Social Studies 32
    33. 33. Practices are always changing… RMIT University © 2013 School of Global Urban and Social Studies 33
    34. 34. Who’s missing? Image source: http://www.control4.com/info/main-street-america RMIT University © 2013 School of Global Urban and Social Studies 34
    35. 35. Who’s missing? • Women (domestic activity) • Teenagers • Children • Babies • Guests • Plants • Sick people • Elderly people • Low-income households • More than half the world’s population • Pets and pests RMIT University © 2013 Image source: http://health.ninemsn.com.au/pregnancy/exerciseandnutrition/700779/topworkouts-for-busy-mums School of Global Urban and Social Studies 35
    36. 36. Who is missing? • Women • Teenagers • Children • Babies • Guests • Plants • Sick people • Elderly people • Low-income households • More than half the world’s population • Pets and pests RMIT University © 2013 Image source: www.acma.gov.au/theACMA/engage-blogs/engage-blogs/Cybersmart/Doschool-holidays-mean-more-internet-use School of Global Urban and Social Studies 36
    37. 37. Who is missing? • Women • Teenagers • Children • Babies • Guests • Plants • Sick people • Elderly people • Low-income households • More than half the world’s population • Pets and pests Image source: http://metro.co.uk/2009/03/25/baby-bath-tots-in-seventh-heaven-572909/ RMIT University © 2013 School of Global Urban and Social Studies 37
    38. 38. Who is missing? • Women • Teenagers • Children • Babies • Plants • Guests • Sick people • Elderly people • Low-income households • More than half the world’s population • Pets and pests Image source: http://www.ece.rochester.edu/~wheinzel/TripAroundTheWorld/india.html RMIT University © 2013 School of Global Urban and Social Studies 38
    39. 39. Who is missing? • Women • Teenagers • Children • Babies • Plants • Sick people • Guests • Elderly people • Low-income households • More than half the world’s population • Pets and pests RMIT University © 2013 Image source: http://www.zagg.com/community/blog/these-apps-turn-your-ipad-into-a-toy-for-your-cat/? utm_source=blog&utm_medium=gplus&utm_campaign=These%20Apps%20Turn%20Your%20iPad %20Into%20A%20Toy%20For%20Your%20Cat School of Global Urban and Social Studies 39
    40. 40. Taking people out of everyday life Resource management Micro-resource managers Everyday life Site of consumption Everyday life (and everyday practices) Laundry, bathing, comfort, toilet flushing, house cleaning, cooking, entertaining RMIT University © 2013 School of Global Urban and Social Studies 40
    41. 41. Part II: Technologies in everyday life Resource management Micro-resource managers Everyday life Site of consumption Everyday life (and everyday practices) Laundry, bathing, comfort, toilet flushing, house cleaning, cooking, entertaining RMIT University © 2013 School of Global Urban and Social Studies 41
    42. 42. Four ‘smart energy’ strategies • Energy consumption feedback • Dynamic pricing • Home automation technologies • Micro-generation RMIT University © 2013 School of Global Urban and Social Studies 42
    43. 43. Reimagining the Smart Utopia RMIT University © 2013 School of Global Urban and Social Studies 43
    44. 44. Beyond the smart containment lines RMIT University © 2013 School of Global Urban and Social Studies 44
    45. 45. Why should we care? RMIT University © 2013 School of Global Urban and Social Studies 45
    46. 46. Westinghouse’s ‘Total Electric Home’ “First impression? Warm and friendly. When guests approach your Total Electric Home, a soft glow of Rayescent (TM) lamps along the entrance path guides them up to the entrance. Additional lights go on automatically as they come near. Bright, cheerful entrance lighting and dramatic interior illumination extend a gracious invitation to your Total Electric Home.” "When guests arrive at the door, a television camera takes their picture and transmits it automatically to closed-circuit monitors located throughout the house. As you view your guests, you'll be able to welcome them over the voice intercom.“ Source: http://thriftshopromantic.blogspot.com.au/2008/06/futures-so-bright-inside-1950s-total.html RMIT University © 2013 School of Global Urban and Social Studies 46
    47. 47. Control4 home automation “Once you have smart lighting in your home, it is hard to imagine living without it. Lighting is an integral part of our daily lives and a fun part of our entertainment experience. … My wife, Laura, likes the Christmas tree to be lit when she wakes up in the morning, and I like it off when everyone goes to bed.” “Entertaining in a home with Control4 is fun and easy. It’s not an engineering project for our relatives or friends to use. The festive atmosphere abounds, everyone is having fun and the technology works in the background to enhance our holiday experience.“ Source: http://www.control4.com/blog/2013/12/smart-lighting-for-the-holidays RMIT University © 2013 School of Global Urban and Social Studies 47
    48. 48. Smart lifestyle • Sony automation – ‘elevating your standards’ – ‘Warm up your Jacuzzi for the arrival home’ • Lutron home automation – ‘Your home is a place where you experience comfort, romance, and peace of mind—a place where you experience pleasance’ Sources: http://discover.store.sony.com/ES/homeautomation.html, www.lutron.com RMIT University © 2013 School of Global Urban and Social Studies 48
    49. 49. Smart Utopia? RMIT University©yyyy School/Department/Area 49
    50. 50. Thank you Yolande Strengers Vice Chancellor’s Research Fellow Beyond Behaviour Change Research Program Centre for Urban Research yolande.strengers@rmit.edu.au @yolandestreng #smartutopia #resourceman RMIT University © 2013 School of Global Urban and Social Studies 50
    51. 51. The secret life of electricity in the home Rose Read Project Manager Northern Alliance for Greenhouse Action
    52. 52. Energy in everyday life Sarah Pink Professor of Design & Media Ethnography RMIT University
    53. 53. Beyond smart utopian energy – observations from the battlefield Alan Pears, AM Part time Senior Lecturer School of Global Urban and Social Studies RMIT University Director Sustainable Solutions
    54. 54. Questions/ discussion

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