Tea plantation in nepal
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Tea plantation in nepal

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Know Nepal and know its tea.

Know Nepal and know its tea.

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Tea plantation in nepal Tea plantation in nepal Presentation Transcript

  • Tea Plantation in Nepal Presented By Gaurab Luitel National Tea and Coffee Development Board Kathmandu, Nepal
  • Official name: Democratic Republic of Nepal Capital: Kathmandu Language: Nepali Currency: Nepalese Rupees. 1US $=approx 80 NRs Population: 26.6 million Density: 180 per sq. km Religion: Hinduism(81%), Buddhism (10%), Islam (5%) Christanity(4%) Major Landmarks: Birthplace of Lord Buddha. Country of Mount Everest.
  • Latitude: 26 12' to 30 27' North Longitude: 80 4' to 88 12' East E-W length: 880 km N-S length: 240 km Area: 147,181 Sq Km Altitude: Range from 60 m to 8,848m above sea level.
  • Geographical Division: Himalayan region (19% ): Hilly region (64%): Terai region (17%): 4500m to 8848m 300m to 4500m 60m to 300 m
  • An average temperature drop of 6°C occurs for every 1,000 m gain in altitude.
  •      Tropical and subtropical zones: 1,200 m. Temperate zone: 1,200 to 2,400 m Cold zone: 2,400 to 3,600 m, Subarctic zone: 3,600 to 4,400m Arctic zone: above 4,400 m
  • Area by %age Category Area (,000 ha) Agricultural land cultivated 3091 Agricultural land uncultivated 1030 Forest land 4268 Shrub land 1560 Grass and pasture land 1766 Others 2620 Total 14718 18% Agricultural land cultivated Agricultural land uncultivated Forest land 22% 12% 7% 11% 30% Shrub land Grass and pasture land Others
  • Contribution to GDP  GDP: $40.81 billion (2012 est.)  Per capita: $1,400  66 % of the people is dependent on Agriculture. 20% 35% Agriculture Service 45% Industry Tea sector employs more than 1,05,000 people directly and 4,20,000 people indirectly.
  • Exports:  Export goods: $1.609 Billion Carpets, Clothing, Jute Grain, Herbs, Tea, Coffee,  Main export partners India: 55.7% United States: 10.1% Germany 4.4% (2012 est.) 
  • Currently, tea exports only account for approximately 2.4 per cent of Nepal‟s overall exports, but it is the third leading agricultural export for Nepal.
  • of Tea Plantation in Nepal
  • History of Tea Plantation in Nepal  It is believed by historians that the first tea bushes in Nepal were grown from seeds which were given as a gift by the Chinese Emperor to the then Prime Minister of Nepal Junga Bahadur Rana in 1842. 1816-1877
  • History of Tea Plantation in Nepal Contd…  Colonel Gajaraj Singh Thapa planted tea first time in Ilam District in 1860s.  Establishment of Ilam Tea Estate in the Hills of Ilam district in 1863.  Establishment of Soktim Tea Estate in the plains of Jhapa district in 1865.  The first tea factory was built in the town of Ilam in 1878.  First Tea Plantation at private Tea sector in Terai was established in 1959 under the name Bhudhakaran Tea Estate.  Nepal Tea Development Corporation was established in1966 by Government of Nepal.
  • History of Tea Plantation in Nepal Contd…  From 1978 to the 1990s, various efforts were made by the Nepal Tea Development Corporation with the Overseas Development Administration (ODA), to encourage the participation of small and marginal farmers in the growth and production of tea as a cash crop.  The then King Birendra declared the five districts i.e. Jhapa, Ilam, Panchthar, Terhathum and Dhankuta of the eastern development region as 'Tea Zone' in 1982.  Establishment of National Tea and Coffee Development Board on 1993.
  • Tea Zone
  • No. of Registered Tea Estate :  No. of Tea Processing Factories:   Orthodox  CTC 142 54 19 35 No. of Tea Cooperative Societies:  No. of Registered Small holders:  Tea consumption  53 9941  Nepal stands in 13th position for tea consumption in the world.  Per capita consumption 350gm  2.42 cups in a day per person
  • Nepal observes 15th of Baishak, which usually coincides with 1st May, as National Tea Day.
  • The highest tea garden of Nepal is Guranse Tea Estate, which is located at an elevation of 7325ft (2232 m) in Dhankuta district.
  • Percentage area by holding Small holders (ha) Large Estate (ha) Total (ha) High Hills 5139 3133 8272 Low Plains 2981 6198 9179 Total 8120 9331 17451 47% 53% Small holders Large Tea Estate
  • Production by percentage Total Production (MT) Orthodox 13% 2355 CTC 15954 Total 18309 Orthodox CTC 87%
  • 20,000,000 18,000,000 16,000,000 14,000,000 12,000,000 10,000,000 8,000,000 6,000,000 4,000,000 2,000,000 0 2001/02 2002/03 2003/04 2004/05 2005/06 2006/07 2007/08 2008/09 2009/10 2010/11 2011/12 20,000 18,000 16,000 14,000 12,000 10,000 8,000 6,000 4,000 2,000 0 Production(kg) Area (ha)
  • Tea Export 12000 10000 8000 6000 4000 2000 0 11060 1,800,000 1,627,588 1,600,000 1,549,891 8889 1,400,000 8600 8498 8499 1,200,000 1,195,319 7000 1,160,593 1,000,000 902,122 800,000 4316 4623 734,285 600,000 438,771 400,000 415,632 884 104,822 200,000 0 Quantity (MT)
  • Major Countries Importing Nepali Tea  India (90%)  Germany (2.8%)  Czech Republic (1.1%)  Kazakhstan (0.8%)  The USA (0.4%)  Canada(0.3%)  France (0.3%) Other  Hong Kong  UK  Austria  Norway  Australia  Denmark  Holland
  • Nepal ranks 19th position in world tea production and contributes 0.34% share.
  • Types of Tea Produced in Nepal 1. CTC  Produced in Jhapa district of Terai.  Covers around 90% of domestic consumption.  Largely big tea estates are behind CTC tea production.  Most of the tea estates have their own processing factories and some use bought leaf factories to manufacture tea.  It is estimated that around 66576 workers are employed by the tea estates as pluckers, factory workers and in other functions.
  • Types of Tea Produced in Nepal Contd… 1. CTC  Production(MT) 15954  Area (ha)  Tea estates and garden  Factory 35  10% Export as %age of Total Production  Small farmer‟s %age share In area In production 26.62% 28.6% 9179 94
  • Types of Tea Produced in Nepal Contd… 2. Orthodox  Orthodox tea is grown in the hills of 6 districts in eastern Nepal, i.e. Illam, Panchthar, Dhankuta, Terathum and new areas of Sindhupalchok and Kaski.  The orthodox tea production accounts for 13% of total tea production.  The primary contributors are small farmers who sell their leaves to buyers in nearby factories or to those in Darjeeling.  The climatic conditions in the Eastern hills of Nepal provide ideal conditions for the production of high quality orthodox tea.  Because of the premium price paid to orthodox tea, 96% of it is exported while little is sold domestically mostly in souvenir packages suited for tourists.
  • Types of Tea Produced in Nepal Contd… 2. Orthodox  Production(MT) 2355 8272 69  Area (ha)  Tea estates and garden  Factory 19  96% Export as %age of Total Production  Small farmer‟s %age share In area In production 77% 67.8%
  • Types of Tea Produced in Nepal 3.Special tea  Green tea  Oolong tea  Herbal tea  Hand-made black tea Contd…
  • Seasonal quality of Nepali orthodox tea 1. Spring Flush  The early first flush tea.  Harvested between February to mid April.  Light red colour with yellowish Green.  Liquor with Gentle taste with aroma and flavour.  Accepted by the connoisseurs as Afternoon tea.
  • Seasonal quality of Nepali orthodox tea 2. Summer Flush  Harvested first flush that comes in May and June.  This flush comes with consolidated qualities of tea with bright and shinning colour.  With wonderful flavour, taste, aroma and muscatel.  Best for late afternoon tea.
  • Seasonal quality of Nepali orthodox tea 3.Monsoon Flush  Tea leaves harvested after June.  Comes with some change in liquor.  It looks deep red but shinning colour, some briskness in taste including other orthodox qualities.  This flush has an honour of morning tea.
  • Seasonal quality of Nepali orthodox tea 4. Autumn Flush  Harvested in the Autumn, the last harvesting season.  Liquor with strong coppery colour with other special qualities i.e. aroma, flavour briskness and muscatel.  Connoisseurs have suggested Autumn flush morning tea with some milk in the liquor.
  •  In 2011, a total of 166 farmers were certified as „organic‟ by the Institute for Marketecology (IMO)  In total, these certified farmers accounted for approximately 250 MT of organic green leaves which were processed into approximately 53 MT of tea.  This organic tea is purchased mainly by a German company and sold all over the world as organic tea from Nepal, with labels such as: “Suderpaani tea”.
  • Organizations  Nepal Tea Association  Nepal Tea Producer's Association  Himalayan Orthodox Tea Producer's Association(HOTPA)  Himalayan Tea Producer's Cooperatives (HIMCOP)  Tea Development Corporation  National Tea and Coffee Development Board
  • Organogram of NTCDB Ministry of Agricultural Development National Tea and Coffee Development Board Regional Office, Jhapa Tea Extension Project Hile, Dhankuta Tea Extension Project Solma, Terathum Tea Extension Project Lalikharka, Pancht har Sub Center, Chilingden Regional Office, Pokhara Tea Extension Project Ranipauwa, Nuwakot Sub Center, Ektin Tea Extension Project, Mangalbar e, Ilam Tea Extension Project, Jasbire, Ilam Tea Extension Project Fikkal, Ilam
  • Role of NTCDB To extend Tea cultivation throughout the country. To provide training and other technical support to the tea farmers. To provide subsidies on planting and processing materials. To co-ordinate among the national and international bodies which are directly or indirectly related to the tea industry. Marketing of Nepal Tea in the international market.
  • Symbol of quality tea from the top of the world
  • INGOs helping Tea Industry in Nepal  USAID  DFID  DANIDA  jiCA  GTZ  HELVETAS  Winrock International
  •       Quality and standard requirements imposed by international trading partners. Lack of proper branding and marketing. Limited R&D investment. Labour shortage. Lack of electricity forces the sector to opt for different energy sources, leading to increases in the cost of production. Lack of adequate infrastructure.
  • Due to the lack of infrastructure, farmers are forced to sell 90 per cent of their products to Indian factories, which are then sold in the world market as Darjeeling Tea.
  • “Darjeeling annually produces less than 10 million kilos of tea. Sales figures indicate almost 40 million kilos are sold as Darjeeling.” -World Tea News
  • Tea Cultivation is projected to expand to 40,000 ha in 10yrs and around 45 million kg of tea is expected to be produced.
  • AMBITION FOR 10 YEARS Plantation area and total Production. SN Type of Tea Area (Hectares) Total Production (million kg) 1 Orthodox 30133 30.13 2 C.T.C. 10652 15.98 Total 40785 46.11
  • AMBITION FOR 10 YEARS Domestic Consumption SN Type of Tea Domestic Consumption (million kg) Value (million) 1 Orthodox 3.01 13.20$ 2 C.T.C. 9.40 20.59$ Total 12.41 33.79$
  • AMBITION FOR 10 YEARS Export SN Type of Tea Export (million kg) Value (million) 1 Orthodox 27.11 197.95$ 2 C.T.C. 6.57 14.40$ Total 33.68 212.35$
  • Tea Research Laboratory has been established in Fikkal, Ilam in 2011.
  • In July, 2013 Government of Nepal has sanctioned budget to establish Auction Center in Jhapa district.