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Implementation of mobile tablet technology (HEA Conference, June 2013)

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Implementation of mobile tablet technology and apps to enhance student learning on an undergraduate Occupational Therapy curriculum

Implementation of mobile tablet technology and apps to enhance student learning on an undergraduate Occupational Therapy curriculum

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  • To facilitate enquiry based and collaborative learning – such as by enabling students to research a topic, discuss and collaborate, share information and present itStudents can use them to structure their time, plan projects, make to do lists, etc..They can facilitate less linear approaches to thinking, problem solving and learning, such as through the use of Mind mapping, card sorts, cork boards etc. – this may also be of benefit to students with DyslexiaAlthough there is room for improvement, iPads in particular have some useful accessibility features such as text to speech, dynamic screen zooming, audio cues for touch control, contrast control, dictation support etc., which potentially widens opportunities for students to participateThey can be used to access research, databases and web based resources such as Moodle, Mendelay, research communities like LinkedIn etc.They can be used by students or staff to review literature, comment on articles and provide feedback on work (including the potential to do this more creatively and interactively such as via Face time and video links or audio comments)They can be used by educators to prepare and present sessions interactively and using a variety of media (including virtual anatomy, physics etc.) – including setting interactive quizzesThey can be used by staff and students to create blogs and websites, videos and multimedia portfolios; these in turn may provide a basis for assessment as well as presentation of research, learning or discussion topics
  • To facilitate enquiry based and collaborative learning – such as by enabling students to research a topic, discuss and collaborate, share information and present itStudents can use them to structure their time, plan projects, make to-do lists, etc.They can facilitate less linear approaches to thinking, problem solving and learning, such as through the use of Mind mapping, card sorts, cork boards etc. – this may also be of benefit to students with DyslexiaAlthough there is room for improvement, iPads in particular have some useful accessibility features such as text to speech, dynamic screen zooming, audio cues for touch control, contrast control, dictation support etc., which potentially widens opportunities for students to participateThey can be used to access research, databases and web based resources such as Moodle, Mendelay, research communities like LinkedIn etc.They can be used by students or staff to review literature, comment on articles and provide feedback on work (including the potential to do this more creatively and interactively such as via Facetime and video links or audio comments)They can be used by educators to prepare and present sessions interactively and using a variety of media (including virtual anatomy, physics etc.) – including setting interactive quizzesThey can be used by staff and students to create blogs and websites, videos and multimedia portfolios; these in turn may provide a basis for assessment as well as presentation of research, learning or discussion topics
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    • 1. Implementation of mobile tablettechnology and apps to enhance studentlearning on an undergraduate occupationaltherapy curriculumAlison J. Laver-Fawcett PhD, OT(C), DipCOT, PCAPStephen Wey, Senior LecturerJanet Golledge, Senior LecturerDasha Zhurauskaya, LTD Student Officer
    • 2. Initial quiz using eClickereClickerClienteClickerPresenter
    • 3. Expectation that technology is part of the landscape;difficulty with environments that lack technologyPreference for pictures rather than textPreference for learning through activity rather thanreading or listeningCraving for speed and inability to tolerate slow-pacedenvironmentPreference for collaboration and constantconnectivityDigital native learner characteristics(Prensky, 2001 and Tapscott, 2009 as cited in Thomson, 2013, p.14)
    • 4. Example appsADOCMuscle SystemKeynotePocket BrainSocrativeTeacher ClickereClickerPresentereClickerClientSocrativeStudent ClickerFINR Brain Atlas3D Brain
    • 5. Teaching anatomy using appsSeveral anatomy apps have been used in teaching onanatomy in the occupational therapy programme across 2modules – Analysing Movement and Health Well being andOccupation.Used in a workshop context so learning was interactive andtask focussed incorporating guided study and questions toanswer (in a workbook)
    • 6. Teaching anatomy using appsApps used included:Muscle System Prohttp://applications.3d4medical.com/muscle_proSkeletal System Pro3DBrain (free)FNIR BrainPocket BrainThis project enabled the students to interact in theworkshop by accessing the resource via the iPad. Allstudents were able to have an iPad in the classroom as wellas access to support using it.
    • 7. Teaching anatomy using appsIt was evident from the workshops that students were moreengaged and use of the technology promoted more discussionaround the subject matter. Additional benefits of the appsincluded:high quality 3D images of the human bodythe ability to zoom in and out of structures within the muscle, skeletal and nervous systemsthe ability to freely rotate the anatomical structures being viewedtactile, gestural, interfaceinteractive media including animations such as of muscle action andjoint movementsdetailed descriptions of the structures
    • 8. Teaching anatomy using appsa searchable index for structuresthe ability to peel back layers to reveal underlying tendons andbones.Links to clinical examples and research in some apps (e.g. 3D andFNIR Brain)Potential for developing quizzesLimitations - familiarity with technology, some anatomicalstructures not covered (particularly nervoussystem/CNS), “pins”, quizzes could be more flexible, animationsnot fully integratedWhat next? – new curriculum e-learning component. Hand, hipand spinal anatomy?iPad project blog - http://blog.yorksj.ac.uk/ipadproject/
    • 9. Example from a level 3 module– going beyond appsTo identify and discuss negative attitudes towards olderadults in society and their impact on participation, healthand well beingTo explore and critique media and public representationsof older adults in societyTo critically evaluate current policy for older adults inrelation to ageism and promoting inclusionStudents were enabled to debate and evaluate positiveviews of ageing in society and generate practicalapproaches to promote theseAims of session
    • 10. Enquiry-based learning activityStudents worked in 4 groups to research themesDefinitions – set the sceneExamples of good/bad practicesPolicy context, guidelines, initiativesPractice implicationsUsed iPads to research information – post links andcomments on Moodle forumPresented to group and led discussion (10 mins pergroup)
    • 11. OutcomeEveryone able to access the web, research sources and Moodle whileremaining free to talk and interact (unlike going to library and accessing14 computers)more collaborative learningfaster access to information to generate and collect together ideasused Moodle discussion forum to share ideas, references and linksStudents collected information using Safari and used Keynote tostructure presentations – familiar methods, close to PowerPointMostly seen to be user friendly – good accessibility featuresSome students more engaged than usualCons – not everyone familiar with using iPads but able to learn quicklyWe were able to provide support throughout the session
    • 12. Using apps to support clinicalassessmentAid for Decision-making in Occupation Choice(ADOC) is an app developed for the i-Pad (Tomori etal, 2012)It can be used to facilitate ‘the client to expresswhat he or she wants and needs to do, andencourages participation in rehabilitation goalsetting process’ADOC involves the choice of illustrations describingdaily activities related to the activities andparticipation domains in the ICFADOC
    • 13. Use of ADOC app for assessmentClients can rate the importance of each activity area on ADOCImportance ratings assist clients and therapists to decide ongoals and prioritise occupations for occupational therapyintervention.ADOC can also be used for the client to self-report his / hersatisfaction related to each chosen occupation on a simple scale.If important occupations for clients are not listed, ADOC allowsclients and occupational therapists to add and to label new itemsas needed.There is a report template and the results page and the reportcan be exported in the format of a password protected pdf file.
    • 14. Use of ADOC app for assessmentADOC was developed in JapanADOC version 1.4 update 2012http://itunes.apple.com/gb/app/adoc-aid-for-decision-making/id433375610?mt=8 [accessed 14.9.12]For more information about ADOC see the paper byTomori K et al (2012) ‘Utilization of the iPadapplication: Aid for Decision-making in OccupationalChoice.’ADOC
    • 15. Examples of student positive feedback frommodule evaluation question related to use of iPadsIncrediblyuseful, learnt themost while usingthemThe iPad gave me greaterunderstanding how theplacement of the muscleaffects the movement thatit makes. Since I wasclearly able to see theattachment of themuscles, and on some howthe muscle moved thejointThey helped me tovisualise andunderstand difficultconceptsvery useful, clearerpictures than inbooks, better labellingsand illustrations, showsmore views tooAs someone who isdyslexic and a visuallearner I found themvery beneficial andeasier to identify themuscles and bonesthan looking in booksI found using theiPads very useful. Itmade the anatomymuch easier tounderstand anddigestI think the use of theipads was great- sosimple to use andreally helped me tounderstandinformation
    • 16. Examples of student negative feedback frommodule evaluation question related to use of iPadsI did not find theapps that useful.The search toolwas useful forfinding thingsquickly, but Iprefer my booksI didnt find the ipads veryhelpful as I prefer to haveall my notes written downin one place but it could beuseful for identifying amuscleFound them useful butdifficult to work.Mainly due to my lackof knowledge intechnology!I have not really usedan i-pad so could notnavigate my wayaround the apps I did not find theapps particularlyuseful. Took thewhole lesson justthe figure out howto use them.
    • 17. Examples of student feedback from moduleevaluation – things to improve uponI think it is not that useful cause Idont have my own one so I canonly use them on lessons and didnot use them very often. I foundthe internet resources more useful.So it would be much more better ifmore useful websites or phoneapps rather than Apple apps couldbe recommendedFound them helpful as avisual resource wouldhave been better if therewere enough for onebetween two as itseasier to seeReally useful for findingthe muscles but it wouldbe even more useful tofind an app which allowsyou to move the parts ofthe body and see how themuscles act...apart fromthat, they were reallygoodThe iPads were veryuseful in sessions but itwasnt always clear howwe were expected to beapplying the informationto what we werelearningI found using iPadwas useful but Ithink we couldhave more iPadfor a large groupof people
    • 18. Best practice principlesAim to use apps that are free or reasonably priced as much aspossibleLecturers spent considerable time researching the mostappropriate apps, including correspondence with app developersto pass on feedback regarding design and contentQuality and reliability of content, interface, usability, gradability– wide variation, quality controlAim to use apps that are available on multiple platforms wherepossible – e.g. Android, PC, Mac as well as iOS
    • 19. Best practice principlesProvision of tablets with workshopsProvision of technical support within workshopsLecturer should be comfortable with using the technologyIt’s not about apps, it’s about processes
    • 20. Pedagogic uses of tabletsTo facilitate enquiry based and collaborative learningUsed by educators to prepare and present sessionsinteractively and using a variety of media (including virtualanatomy, physics etc..) – including setting interactivequizzesSocrativ, e-Clicker vs “hands up”Can facilitate less linear approaches to thinking, problemsolving and learningAccessibility features – visual impairment, dyslexia
    • 21. Pedagogic uses of tabletsInteracting with VLEsAccessing research, databases, research communities andweb based resourcesThey can be used by students or staff to reviewliterature, comment on articles and provide feedback onassignments – marking, multimedia feedback, actionfeedback, FacetimeStudents can use them to structure their time, planprojects, make to-do lists, etc.Used by staff and students to create blogs andwebsites, videos and multimedia portfolios
    • 22. Situating use of tablets within theteaching and learning ecosystemActivity theory analyses an entire workingactivity system (includingorganisations), beyond just oneuser, focusing on purposeful activity, therelationship between people and the toolsthey use, and in particular the role of toolsand other artefacts (such as tablets) asmediators in people’s everyday activitiesand learning.Kaptelinin and Nardi, 2006
    • 23. Card sort app (iCardSort) to evaluate studentplacement interventionsCoaches Eye and similar apps for Movement analysisClinical intervention – Visual Creator – activity analysisand scheduling, sequencing, and cueing, for peoplewith cognitive disabilitiesLife Story Work – use of iPads as clinical and researchtoolAdditional examples (if time)
    • 24. Kaptelinin, V and Nardi, B (2006) Acting With Technology:Activity Theory and Interaction Design. MIT Press: LondonThompson P (2013) The digital natives as learners:Technology use patterns and approaches to learning.Computers and Education, 65, 12 – 33. Available from:http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.compedu.2012.12.022 [accessed28.5.13]Tomori K, Uezu S, Kinjo S, Ogahara K, Nagatani R, Higashi T(2012) Utilization of the iPad application: Aid for Decision-making in Occupational Choice. Occupational TherapyInternational, 19, 88-97References